Why Jenkins still continuously serves developers : idk.dev

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For an estimated 15 million developers, Jenkins is synonymous with countless iterations of collectible stickers of the iconic, non-assuming butler that have adorned their laptops all over the world. The butler is representative of the ubiquitous open source continuous integration (CI) technology that has quietly automated an endless set of development tasks for well over a decade.Jenkins origins trace back to late 2004 at Sun Microsystems where it started life as Hudson. Its creator Kohsuke Kawaguchi is a coder who simply wanted to give his developer teammates some idle time back to write good software. In 2011, the project was emancipated from Oracle after the Sun acquisition and took the name Jenkins. Maintained by a large open source community, Jenkins has thrived as a versatile automation engine for mundane, repetitive software development jobs. Continuous integration is the term adopted for the infinite set of time-and-resource-intensive testing and integration processing that Jenkins performs to free up software delivery teams to continuously build and deliver more rapidly.The extensibility built into this engine still fuels its current popularity. Designed with a plugin architecture, it allows software developers to quickly write their own plugin or choose among the thousands contributed by the Jenkins community. This …

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