Unique system could treat wastewater with natural methods, student believes

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Building a natural wastewater treatment system as part of a new Trans Canada Highway interpretive centre and rest stop could protect the environment and water sources, a Saskatchewan Polytechnic student believes.

The educational institution’s recent Applied Research Student Showcase featured 39 videos of students explaining how their projects could help solve real-world problems. The provincial college shared the videos of the applied research projects online for judges and industry partners to adjudicate. The adjudicators then named projects as first-, second- or third-place winners, along with an Industry Choice winner and a Joseph A. Remai School of Construction winner.

The virtual showcase was an example of Sask. Polytech’s efforts to maintain annual celebrations and traditions through online events during the coronavirus pandemic.

Edward LaFayette, a student in the architectural technologies program in Moose Jaw, won $500 as the Joseph A. Remai School of Construction recipient for his project entitled, “Integrating a ‘living machine’ into a building design.”

Also, Andrew Brittner, a student in Environmental Engineering Technology in Moose Jaw, won $500 as the Industry Choice recipient for this projected entitled, “Development of a project geographic information system (GIC) for the former Husky Refinery site in Moose Jaw.”

The living machine

LaFayette’s …

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