This process will determine how quickly we get a coronavirus vaccine

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Emergency use authorization is what its name suggests: a medical product that gets special authorization by the US Food and Drug Administration to be used during an emergency. Sometimes it’s a product that has already been FDA-approved, but for another condition, and sometimes it’s a new product that hasn’t yet received the agency’s green light.There is a lot of ongoing concern and debate about whether any vaccine candidate should be granted an EUA — or outright approval — without first completing Phase 3 clinical trials.The 411 of EUAsAccording to the FDA’s website, during public health emergencies, the agency can use Emergency Use Authorizations “to help make medical products available as quickly as possible by allowing unapproved medical products to reach patients in need when there are no adequate, FDA-approved and available alternatives.” But that’s only if “the known and potential benefits of the product, when used to diagnose, prevent, or treat the identified disease or condition, outweigh the known and potential risks of the product.”So, in essence, what an EUA does is speed up the process of getting potentially helpful  medical products authorized for a specific use to the public during a health emergency, without the rigorous testing and …

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