The market for robotic surgery is rapidly expanding

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The number of surgical procedures performed using robots is growing quickly. As such, the market for robotic surgical systems and accessories is rapidly expanding. The use of robots to perform surgery occurred in as early as 1985 when the PUMA 560 robotic surgical arm (Westinghouse Corp) was used for neurosurgical biopsies. This was followed by the AESOP system (Computer Motion), which became the first Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved system for endoscopic surgery.
By 2000, Intuitive Surgical’s da Vinci robot became the first FDA-approved system for general laparoscopic surgery. Since this time, Intuitive Surgical has been the market leader for robotic surgical systems with most general surgery procedures utilising this system and variations of it. More recently, Stryker acquired MAKO in 2013 and this system was subsequently approved in 2015 for partial knee, total hip and total knee replacement.
By 2019, other major medical device companies entered the robotic surgery space with Johnson & Johnson acquiring Auris Health and its Monarch system for bronchoscopic procedures, and Siemens Healthineers’ acquisition of Corindus Vascular Robotics. By 2020, the types of procedures able to be performed by robots included neurosurgery indications, especially with Medtronic receiving FDA approval for cranial procedures such as brain tissue biopsies, electrode placement and laser-ablation …

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