Advertisement

‘Lifestyle medicine’ can help you live a better, longer life

‘lifestyle medicine’ can help you live a better, longer life

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:










In Latin, the word “physician” means “teacher,” and a unique form of specialty medicine known as Lifestyle Medicine is taking that meaning literally by teaching patients how to live their healthiest lives.Lifestyle Medicine is an effort to reverse an alarming trend in the U.S. that has seen patients eating themselves into an unhealthy state and then taking medication to “fix” the resulting chronic diseases, says Dr. Donna Mueller, a UPMC Lifestyle Medicine physician.

“It is patient care that empowers the patient to take charge of their own health through coaching and support from their provider, rather than the paternalistic form of previous medical care delivery where the provider told the patient what to do and they simply complied,” Dr. Mueller says.Many of the diseases most prevalent among Americans are rooted in lifestyle choices, Dr. Mueller notes. Especially in these days of COVID-19, it is more important than ever that patients understand the impact those daily choices have on their health.Poor lifestyle choices can lead to Type 2 diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, coronary artery disease, depression, cancer and some autoimmune diseases, along with a pattern of taking medications in response to those conditions.“In Lifestyle …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE

A Japanese Physician Questions “Health-First” in the Era of COVID-19

a japanese physician questions “health-first” in the era of covid-19

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed our actions, perceptions, and lifestyles. Physician Ōwaki Kōshirō advocates prioritizing lifestyle over health, accepting certain risks, precisely because we must exist together with COVID-19 into the foreseeable future.

An Informed Choice Not to Choose
As we are embroiled in the current COVID-19 infodemic—a flood of information that includes both accurate and inaccurate details to sift through—perhaps the principle of always divining correct information is itself a fallacy. We also have the option to ignore information, says the physician Ōwaki Kōshirō, who presents a bold challenge to the commonly accepted wisdom.
Ōwaki believes that advocating health literacy to discern correct from false information is based on the world view of health professionals, the media, and other experts. Falsities that are circulating outnumber truths in far greater volume than experts realize. It may seem preferable to reach the truth, but there is a high risk that people will believe bogus information instead. Rather than fretting incessantly over which answer is true or false, he states, we should have the option of choosing neither.
According to Ōwaki, even scientific rationale, or so-called evidence, is no guarantee of certainty or efficacy. Put simply, conclusions vary …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “A Japanese Physician Questions “Health-First” in the Era of COVID-19”

A 7-Day High-Fiber Meal Plan to Help You Lose Weight

a 7-day high-fiber meal plan to help you lose weight

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

This recipe for Plant-Protein Powered Butternut Mac and “Cheese” boasts 11 grams of fiber.
Image Credit: Maggie Moon
Fiber isn’t just the go-to nutrient for keeping our bodies regular. It’s also a powerful source for maintaining a healthy weight and promoting weight loss. Yes, indeed: Pumping up your fiber intake can help you slim down.
How Fiber Can Help With Weight Loss
There are two types of fiber — soluble and insoluble, per the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Soluble dietary fiber is just that: It dissolves in water and forms a gel-like substance in your stomach that’s then broken down in your large intestine. This is the type of fiber that helps lower your cholesterol and is good for your heart health.
Insoluble dietary fiber doesn’t dissolve; instead, it passes through your GI tract and helps keep you regular.
Both types of fiber contribute to weight loss. That’s because fiber, in general, keeps you feeling fuller longer after a meal or snack (compared to low- or no-fiber foods) and can help you eat less, per Harvard Health Publishing. Plus, foods high in fiber tend to be relatively low in calories.
How Much Fiber You Should Aim For
Most of us fall …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “A 7-Day High-Fiber Meal Plan to Help You Lose Weight”

Ask the Doctors: Transition to vegan diet should be gradual

ask the doctors: transition to vegan diet should be gradual

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

Dear Doctors: Our 16-year-old daughter wants to become a vegan. Her father and I think that may be a bit extreme, so we’ve compromised, and first she’s going to try being a vegetarian. What’s a good way for a growing teen to safely make the transition?Dear Reader: We’re both parents ourselves, so we understand your concerns about meeting your daughter’s nutritional needs. A vegan diet, which cuts out all foods derived from living creatures — including eggs, dairy products, gelatin and honey — can send you on a steep learning curve. Even the more lenient parameters of a vegetarian diet take care and planning to be healthful and well-balanced.As with any diet, the goal is to get enough calories, protein, vitamins and minerals from a wide array of fresh and healthful foods. The good news is that vegetarian and vegan diets are quite popular. That means the information and products your daughter needs to be a healthy vegetarian are widely available.When following a vegetarian diet, your daughter will no longer eat red meat, poultry, fish or other seafood. Vegetarians may choose whether or not to eat eggs and dairy products. (Some, referred to as pescatarians, include fish …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “Ask the Doctors: Transition to vegan diet should be gradual”

Ohio’s exhausted front-line nurses say coronavirus patients appear ‘sicker than ever’

ohio’s exhausted front-line nurses say coronavirus patients appear ‘sicker than ever’

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

Erin Layton wishes the public could see what she sees when she goes to work every day.”The patients we’re seeing now in the ICU are sicker than ever,” said Layton, a registered nurse at OhioHealth Grant Medical Center. “It can be emotionally exhausting to give so much to your patients and they’re still dying at such a high rate.”On a typical day Layton walks into the Downtown hospital, stops at her locker to grab her respirator and face shield, and then heads to the intensive care unit to care for some of the region’s sickest COVID-19 patients.As virus-related hospitalizations spike across Ohio, Layton has become one of the thousands of front-line health-care workers who witness more pain and suffering as patients struggle to breathe and fight for the lives. If the rest of Ohio could be a fly on the wall when Layton makes her rounds, she said, it would likely erase any doubts they have about the virus. Many times, the immediate family members of COVID-19 patients in the ICU are in isolation themselves to prevent the spread of the disease. That often means nurses such as Layton are the single-person support system for patients they …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “Ohio’s exhausted front-line nurses say coronavirus patients appear ‘sicker than ever’”

Bedsores kill over 60K people in the US each year. Amid COVID, experts worry more may be at risk.

bedsores kill over 60k people in the us each year. amid covid, experts worry more may be at risk.

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

Hospitals are putting extra focus on preventing pressure injuries, known as bedsores or pressure ulcers, as coronavirus cases continue to rise across the country and ICU beds fill with critically ill patients.While it may not be the first concern for many bed-bound patients, the National Pressure Injury Advisory Panel  estimates pressure injuries affect more than 2.5 million patients each year and claim over 60,000 lives.Dr. William Padula, president-elect of NPIAP and a professor at the University of Southern California, worries that pressure injuries may increase this year as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates there could be up to 19,000 new COVID-19 hospitalizations per day by Dec. 7.Padula said pressure injuries can occur within hours of being in the ICU immobilized and on a ventilator. “The skin is the largest organ system,” said Dr. Martine Sanone, associate professor of geriatrics and palliative medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. “However, when we think of critical illness, we forget about that first barrier.”The coronavirus has not only increased the influx of patients requiring hospitalization, it also has complicated care and pressure-injury prevention.A pressure injury is localized damage to the skin or underlying soft tissue, usually over …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “Bedsores kill over 60K people in the US each year. Amid COVID, experts worry more may be at risk.”

Physicians: Don’t let COVID-19 resurgence delay medical care

physicians: don’t let covid-19 resurgence delay medical care

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

One of Dr. Mark Ricciardi’s patients wasn’t exactly the Hollywood image of a heart attack victim.
In the movie version, someone having a heart attack clutches the left side of the chest in agony. But Ricciardi’s patient felt discomfort, a pressure sensation, in the center of his chest and a bit lower, what doctors call epigastric pain.






        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        



The man dismissed his symptoms, a warning sign of serious heart trouble, and put off seeing a doctor until he was in the throes of another major medical emergency.
“He had a full-on stroke,” Ricciardi said.
The cardiologist with NorthShore University HealthSystem points to the case as a cautionary tale about the risks of suffering at home and delaying medical care during the pandemic.
Physicians, researchers and the American Heart Association have expressed alarm over people avoiding the hospital for fear of exposure to the virus or because they don’t want to burden the health care system.
In the early spring, NorthShore saw a 50% reduction in heart attack cases during the state’s stay-at-home order. While the system, which includes Glenbrook Hospital in Glenview, is not reporting such a decline right now, Ricciardi is worried about another steep drop-off as Illinois faces a renewed …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “Physicians: Don’t let COVID-19 resurgence delay medical care”

Vegans at higher risk for bone fractures, study finds

vegans at higher risk for bone fractures, study finds

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

Vegan-based diets have gained popularity over the past few years, and while it can help you eat healthier and less processed foods, it could have long term health impacts.A recent study published Sunday in the journal BMC Medicine showed vegans and vegetarians might be at a greater risk for bone fractures. 
This finding was attributed to the low body mass index, low physical activity and inadequate intake of calcium and protein that is synonymous with a plant-based diet, CNN reported.
The study surveyed 55,000 adults from the UK on diet, socio-economic characteristics, lifestyle and medical history in 1993 – 2001. Surveyors followed up with those interviewed for a second survey 10 years later.
It found 4.1 more cases of bone fractures in vegetarians and 19.4 more cases in vegans for every 1,000 people over the course of 10 years.
While vegetarians only skip meat, vegans opt out of any animal products, including eggs, dairy and even honey. Many restaurants have adopted vegan options on their menus, and some vegan-exclusive restaurants have gained popularity in the last 10 years.
The lack of minerals and nutrients commonly consumed through meat or eggs can make bones more weak and fracture prone.
Previous studies have already shown that vegetarians have lower bone …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “Vegans at higher risk for bone fractures, study finds”

Turning the Tide – Lifestyle Medicine – Report of LM202 (2)

turning the tide – lifestyle medicine – report of lm202 (2)

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

“,document.children[0].innerHTML=loader;var fetchUrl=window.appEndPoint+window.location.pathname;(fetchUrl+window.location.search).match(/pwa-amp/)&&(fetchUrl=window.appEndPoint+”/pt_wp_post_amp/”+getPostId()),fetch_text(fetchUrl).then(function(e){document.write(‘

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “Turning the Tide – Lifestyle Medicine – Report of LM202 (2)”