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Connecticut’s ‘Father of Modern Vaccines.’

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Medicine wasn’t John Franklin Enders’ first career choice.Or even his second.It is fortunate for vaccine science that he settled on the field. In 1954 Enders and two other scientists working in his lab were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their vaccine research. He would later develop the measles vaccine, and ultimately be remembered as the “Father of Modern Vaccines.”








circa 1955: Professor John Franklin Enders (1897 – 1985), the bacteriologist who shared the Nobel prize in 1954 for research into poliomyelitis and in 1962 developed a vaccine for measles.

Photo by Keystone/Getty Images

Enders was born in 1897 in West Hartford to a prominent family. His grandfather, Thomas O. Enders, was a banker and then founder of Aetna Life Insurance Co. His father, John Ostrom Enders, was also a prominent Hartford banker and would be responsible for a series of mergers in 1927 that formed the Hartford National Bank and Trust Co. Among the family’s notable financial clients was Hartford resident and legendary writer Mark Twain, whose trademark white suits reportedly impressed young John Franklin Enders.Educated as a child at Noah Webster School in Hartford, Enders had an interest in biology from a young age but was drawn …

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What we know — and don’t know — about Russia’s ‘Sputnik V’ vaccine

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President Vladimir Putin says his own daughter has already received it, but testing is yet to be completed and experts are skeptical about how quickly the vaccine has been registered. While details about the research behind the vaccine are limited, here’s what we know so far.What do we know about the Russian vaccine?The vaccine was developed by the Moscow-based Gamaleya Institute, using funding from the Russian Direct Investment Fund (RDIF). The vaccine is named Sputnik V — a reference to the 1957 Soviet Union satellite.Scientists conducted months of human trials but are yet to publish data and did not begin the crucial Phase 3 stage, which usually precedes approval, before the announcement on Tuesday. On Wednesday it was announced that a Phase 3 trial involving more than 2,000 people in Russia and several Middle Eastern and Latin American countries had begun. Typically this stage of trial involves testing on tens of thousands of people.Dr. Scott Gottlieb, former commissioner of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), said Tuesday that the number of people the vaccine had been tested on so far was the equivalent of a Phase 1 trial, which typically involves a small group and studies the safety of the …

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Dow Jumps 250 Points Amid Coronavirus Vaccine Optimism

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TOPLINEThe market opened higher on Wednesday after President Trump announced that the U.S. government will purchase 100 million doses of Moderna’s experimental coronavirus vaccine.

Stocks are rallying on renewed hopes for a vaccine.

Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images

KEY FACTS

The Dow Jones Industrial Average was up 0.7%, nearly 200 points, at Wednesday’s open, while the S&P 500 rose 0.9% and the tech-heavy Nasdaq Composite gained 1.5%.

President Trump announced late on Tuesday that the federal government will purchase 100 million doses of Moderna’s experimental coronavirus vaccine, which is currently in late-stage human trials.

The deal, worth $1.5 billion, follows similar agreements the government has made with other drug makers for potential coronavirus treatments, such as Pfizer and Johnson & Johnson.

Moderna, which saw its stock jump around 3%, said that the deal also gives the federal government the option to purchase up to additional 400 million doses.

Shares of companies that would benefit from a vaccine and a reopening of the economy—including airlines, cruise stocks and retailers—jumped on the news Wednesday.

Tech stocks were also rebounding on Wednesday, after dragging the market lower in the previous session: Shares of Apple, Microsoft and Facebook were up by more than 1%.

Crucial quote
“While markets …

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Coronavirus update: Latest news from around the world

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Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern speaks to media during a press conference at Parliament on August 12, Wellington, New Zealand. Hagen Hopkins/Getty ImagesNew Zealand will defer the dissolution of Parliament “by at least a few days,” which would allow it to reconvene if needed, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced at a news conference Wednesday.The dissolution of Parliament was scheduled to take place on Wednesday in a key step toward holding a national election on September 19. Ardern said that “no decision yet as you can imagine” has been taken regarding the postponement of the election. The announcement comes after New Zealand confirmed four new locally transmitted Covid-19 cases Tuesday, breaking the 102-day streak the country had gone without recording a local infection.All four of the cases were found within one household in South Auckland, and none of them had recently traveled outside of New Zealand, according to New Zealand’s Director-General of Health Dr. Ashley Bloomfield. Elderly homes closed: Ardern also announced Wednesday that all retirement homes in New Zealand will be closed off in a bid to protect “vulnerable ” communities from the spread of coronavirus.Ardern said all aged care facilities would be closed to everyone but staff and essential …

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Survey finds most parents nervous to take their kids for vaccinations due to COVID-19

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Orlando, Fla – Vaccination rates in the U.S. have plummeted amid COVID-19, something experts warn could lead to the next pandemic of dangerous and preventable childhood diseases. A new national survey by Orlando Health finds while the vast majority of parents (84%) believe vaccines are the best way to protect their children from infectious diseases, two-thirds are still nervous to take their kids to their pediatrician’s office due to COVID-19.
“It is imperative that parents keep their routine wellness visits with their child’s pediatrician,” said Alix Casler, MD, a pediatrician and chair of the Department of Pediatrics for Orlando Health Physician Associates. “While we are doing as many visits as possible virtually, coming in for vaccinations is important not only for protecting your child, but also to preserve herd immunity against these terrible diseases.”
Like many physicians, Casler has put protocols in place at her practice to keep patients as safe as possible. Some of these include seeing one family at a time, having patients wait in their cars rather than a waiting room and implementing COVID-19 screenings, putting patients and parents at ease and making them more likely to keep their appointments.
“All it will take is a case …

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More than 97,000 children tested positive for Covid-19 in the last two weeks of July, report says

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Dr. Stephen Hahn made the declaration in a video briefing with the American Medical Association. More than 5 million Americans have been infected with coronavirus, and more than 163,000 have died, according to Johns Hopkins data. Hahn acknowledged that because of the speed with which the agency is working, some experts have questioned whether the FDA will compromise its scientific principles in reviewing clinical trial data. “Let me assure you that we will not cut corners,” Hahn said. “All of our decisions will continue to be based on good science and the same careful deliberative processes we have always used when reviewing medical products.”Many Americans are skeptical about a vaccine. Hahn said he has seen surveys that report a significant part of the public will be reluctant to get a Covid-19 vaccine. A CNN poll in May found one-third of Americans said they would not try to get vaccinated against Covid-19, even if the vaccine is widely available and low-cost. Hahn asked doctors on the briefing Monday to urge their patients to take the vaccine once it is approved.”We hope that you will urge your patients to take an approved vaccine, so that we can seek to establish widespread immunity,” …

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Real-life discussions may help counter anti-vaccination influences from social media

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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Aug 10 2020
The flu vaccine is considered one of the great achievements in public health, and each year it prevents millions of people from getting sick and thousands of deaths. Even so, social media messages abound with skepticism and falsehoods about vaccination.

What effect, if any, do these social media messages have on actual vaccination behavior?

A new study on this underexplored subject, using big data and survey results from the 2018-19 flu season, finds strong associations between regional social media messages and vaccination attitudes and behavior. But when there are negative associations between social media content and vaccination, real-life discussions with family and friends appear to eliminate them.

The study, published in the journal Vaccine, analyzes 115,330 geolocated tweets about the flu and vaccination along with data from a survey of 3,005 U.S. adults conducted from September 2018 to May 2019. The research was done by Man-pui Sally Chan and Dolores Albarracín of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Kathleen Hall Jamieson, director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center (APPC) of the University of Pennsylvania.


What we find is that some online discussions appear to have a negative influence on people’s attitudes and vaccine behavior – …

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University Of California Mandates Flu Vaccinations

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 Students are heading back to school and colleges are considering safety in the middle of the pandemic. So, on Friday, the president of the UC system released an executive order requiring all students and staff to get flu vaccines this fall.  Representatives from the UC say they anticipate a surge of flu cases in the fall and winter. The vaccines are a preventative measure. The goal is to limit the number of flu cases at healthcare facilities in order to save resources for COVID-19 patients.  The executive action requires vaccination for all faculty and staff working at a UC location to get a vaccine by November 1. The University system already has a rigorous immunization policy for students. This action adds influenza to the already existing vaccine requirements, and extends the rules to staff, who were not previously included in the guidelines. Students and staff will be able to request exemptions for medical and religious reasons. The UC and Covered California insurance plans cover flu vaccines at no additional cost.

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Inovio shares update on COVID-19 vaccine, and its financial outlook

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In March, during a public meeting with President Donald Trump and pharma executives, Kim touted Inovio’s “innovative, 21st-century platform” that enabled it to whip up its vaccine candidate in a mere three hours. Soon after, an analyst who is shorting Inovio’s stock accused the firm of “serial stock promotion.” And soon after that, two separate groups of shareholders filed lawsuits in federal court in Pennsylvania, accusing Kim and Inovio of exaggerated claims and financial improprieties.

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FDA won’t ‘cut corners’ to approve a Covid-19 vaccine, commissioner says – NewsChannel 3-12

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Safety will not be compromised for a Covid-19 vaccine, the US Food and Drug Administration commissioner said Monday.

Dr. Stephen Hahn made the declaration in a video briefing with the American Medical Association. More than 5 million Americans have been infected with coronavirus, and more than 162,000 have died, according to Johns Hopkins data.

Hahn acknowledged that because of the speed with which the agency is working, some experts have questioned whether the FDA will compromise its scientific principles in reviewing clinical trial data.

“Let me assure you that we will not cut corners,” Hahn said. “All of our decisions will continue to be based on good science and the same careful deliberative processes we have always used when reviewing medical products.”

Many Americans are skeptical about a vaccine. Hahn said he has seen surveys that report a significant part of the public will be reluctant to get a Covid-19 vaccine. A CNN poll in May found one-third of Americans said they would not try to get vaccinated against Covid-19, even if the vaccine is widely available and low-cost.

Hahn asked doctors on the briefing Monday to urge their patients to take the vaccine once it is approved.

“We hope that you …

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