Advertisement

IonQ Hires Dave Bacon and Denise Ruffner

ionq hires dave bacon and denise ruffner

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

IonQ announces Dave Bacon as new VP of Software and Denise Ruffner as new VP of Business Development.
IonQ, the leader in quantum computing, today announced new additions to its leadership team. Dave Bacon has joined IonQ as the Vice President of Software, coming to IonQ from Google’s quantum engineering team. Denise Ruffner, former Chief Business Officer of Cambridge Quantum Computing, has joined IonQ as the Vice President of Business Development.
“We are beyond thrilled to have Dave and Denise on board. Both are undeniable leaders in the quantum computing industry and will bring invaluable experience to the IonQ team as we continue to grow,” said IonQ CEO & President Peter Chapman. “Our mission is to attract the best talent in the world to help us build and scale, and having Dave and Denise join us from two of the industry’s biggest players further affirms that IonQ is the true leader in quantum.”
Dave Bacon, who was a Senior Staff Software Engineer at Google, led the quantum software team where he helped launch Google’s quantum service this year. He was a key driver of Google’s quantum supremacy announcement and is one half of the Bacon-Shor Code for …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE

Honeywell reveals next-gen quantum computer

honeywell reveals next-gen quantum computer

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

Honeywell has introduced its next-generation quantum computer the System Model H1 which features its differentiated quantum charge-coupled device (QCCD) and trapped-ion technology with a design ready to be rapidly upgraded throughout its lifetime.The company’s new quantum computer will initially offer 10 fully connected qubits, a proven quantum volume of 128 and unique features such as mid-circuit measurement and qubit reuse. Going forward though, Honeywell has committed to rapidly increase the quantum volume of its quantum computers by at least an order of magnitude annually over the course of the next five years.Enterprises will be able to directly access its System Model H1 via a cloud API as well as through Microsoft Azure Quantum and channel partners including Zapata Computing and Cambridge Quantum Computing through a subscription-based model.President of Honeywell Quantum Solutions Tony Uttley explained how its H1 generation of quantum computers will be continually updated throughout their lifetime in a press release, saying:”Honeywell’s aggressive quantum computing roadmap reflects our commitment to achieving commercial scale for our quantum business. Our subscription-based model provides enterprise customers with access to Honeywell’s most advanced system available. Honeywell’s unique methodology enables us to systematically and continuously ‘upgrade’ the H1 generation of systems through …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “Honeywell reveals next-gen quantum computer”

Direction decided by rate of coin flip in quantum world

direction decided by rate of coin flip in quantum world

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

Flip a coin. Heads? Take a step to the left. Tails? Take a step to the right. In the quantum world? Go in both directions at once, like a wave spreading out. Called the walker analogy, this random process can be applied in both classical and quantum algorithms used in state-of-the-art technologies such as artificial intelligence and data search processes. However, the randomness also makes the walk difficult to control, making it more difficult to precisely design systems.
A research team based in Japan may be moving toward a more controlled walk by unveiling the mechanism underlying the directional decision of each quantum step and introducing a way to potentially control the direction of movement. They published their results on October 16 in Scientific Reports, a Nature Research journal.
“In our study, we focused on the coin determining the behavior of the quantum walk to explore controllability,” said paper author Haruna Katayama, graduate student in the Graduate School of Integrated Arts and Sciences at Hiroshima University.
In classical systems, the coin directs the walker in space: right or left. In quantum systems, a coin is infinitely less reliable, since the walker operates both as a particle stood in one space and …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “Direction decided by rate of coin flip in quantum world”

Honeywell moves the qubit further with its new H1 quantum computer

honeywell moves the qubit further with its new h1 quantum computer

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

Honeywell on Thursday introduced the next generation of its quantum computing system, claiming the highest quantum volume measured in the industry.Why it matters: New versions of quantum computers are coming out almost monthly, as the industry continues to push the technical boundaries of the technology. The real challenge, however, comes with designing systems that can move out of the lab and into the hands of actual customers.By the numbers: Honeywell’s H1 system offers 10 fully connected qubits — the quantum bits that are the basic unit of quantum computing — and a proven quantum volume of 128.Yes, but: As importance as raw performance is, what matters even more is a quantum computer’s ability to actually perform useful applications for commercial clients, says Tony Uttley, president of Honeywell Quantum Solutions. “This has never been an academic exercise for us. It’s a business and we want to serve industries that could be massively affected by quantum.”How it works: Potential customers will be able to access the H1 on the cloud via a subscription service, and receive help from Honeywell’s quantum experts — useful, since using a quantum computer is still far more complex than employing a classical one.Among the customers with access …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “Honeywell moves the qubit further with its new H1 quantum computer”

Honeywell reveals 10-qubit trapped-ion quantum computer

honeywell reveals 10-qubit trapped-ion quantum computer

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

Honeywell International Inc. today introduced a 10-qubit quantum computer, the System H1, that it will make available to enterprise customers via the cloud.
Honeywell is one of the world’s major makers of industrial and aerospace gear. It made a surprise return into computing this March, about 30 years after exiting the market, by revealing that it was developing a quantum computer based on a so-called trapped -on design. That computer came online a few months later.
The System H1 debuted today has 10 qubits and double the performance thanks to an increased quantum volume of 128, according to Honeywell. Quantum volume is a metric for measuring quantum computers’ speed that was introduced by IBM Corp. in 2017. The metric is calculated based on not only the number of qubits in a system but also other factors that influence how effectively calculations are performed. 
The qubits inside the System H1 are ytterbium ions, or charged atoms, suspended inside a device known as an ion trap. Carefully tuned electromagnetic fields hold the atoms in place. Computations are performed by encoding information into the spin state of the ions using lasers, then manipulating this information in a way that facilitates data processing.
Honeywell’s system design …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “Honeywell reveals 10-qubit trapped-ion quantum computer”

IonQ Unveils New Quantum Data Center

ionq unveils new quantum data center

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

COLLEGE PARK, Md., Oct. 29, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — IonQ, the leader in quantum computing, today announced the opening of its new Quantum Data Center. In addition to IonQ’s current space, the 23,000 square foot Quantum Data Center, strategically located in Maryland’s Discovery District, will house IonQ’s existing state of the art quantum computers. This will significantly expedite the development of future, more powerful quantum computers for commercial use.
This new space marks IonQ’s first major expansion and will feature increased reliability via both onsite generators and battery backups, backup quantum computers, and state of the art security. It will also feature redundant point of presence (PoP) connections to the Internet2 backbone, the nation’s coast-to-coast research network that provides secure research environments for universities.
The new Quantum Data Center can accommodate 10 quantum computers, with space for more as IonQ’s systems simultaneously scale down in size and scale up in number of qubits with each new generation. Currently, IonQ is working on three new generations of quantum computers in parallel, with each expected to be exponentially more powerful than the last.
“Our Quantum Data Center solidifies IonQ’s position in leading the race to build quantum computers able to tackle problems not yet solvable,” said Mahsa …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “IonQ Unveils New Quantum Data Center”

Hot quantum computing startup IonQ nabs two high-profile former leaders at Google and IBM as it aims to scale what it says is the world’s most powerful machine

iam platform login page background

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

Quantum computing startup IonQ nabbed two high-profile hires. 
Denise Ruffner, the previous chief business officer at rival Cambridge Quantum Computing, is coming onboard as the vice president of business development.
Former Google quantum software head Dave Bacon is joining as the vice president of software.
Bacon was one of the leads on Google’s disputed quantum supremecy announcement last year. 
Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

IonQ poached two top leaders in the quantum computing industry, the hot startup announced on Wednesday — giving it more of the key personnel it needs to take on heavyweights like Google, IBM, and Honeywell in advancing what the company calls the world’s most powerful machine.Former Google quantum software head Dave Bacon is joining as the vice president of software. Bacon was one of the handful of executives behind Google’s disputed “quantum supremacy” announcement last year, when the company said it was able to process calculations deemed impossible by today’s more traditional computers. Read more: John Martinis, the Google computer scientist who helped the company achieve ‘quantum supremacy’ last year, has resigned: ‘There was a lot of tension going on’And Denise Ruffner, the previous chief business officer at Cambridge Quantum Computing, a rival to …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “Hot quantum computing startup IonQ nabs two high-profile former leaders at Google and IBM as it aims to scale what it says is the world’s most powerful machine”

Over 570 register for Technion’s first quantum computing summer school

iam platform login page background

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:


Over 570 people have registered, and 220 students took part in Israel’s first summer school in practical quantum computing at the Technion which took place earlier this month.The course presented the foundations of quantum computing theory along with a practical programming course on an IBM quantum mini-computer. Participants did not require an in-depth prior knowledge of programming languages, allowing a wide range of students to explore the subject.Major multinational companies, including IBM, Google, Daimler and Pfizer, are building infrastructure to prepare for the wider use of quantum computing. Technion encourages its students to learn quantum computing so that they will be ready to meet the demands of the hi-tech industry of tomorrow.“Quantum computers are expected to revolutionize the world of computing,” said Prof. Netanel Lindner, director of the “Quantum Computing Primer” school at the Technion, in a press release. “In certain tasks, they will most likely account for a significant improvement compared to the computers with which we are currently familiar. Although we can’t predict the scope of its impact, some members of the scientific community believe that the effect of quantum computing on research, industry, and business will be enormous.”The School for Quantum Computing is part …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “Over 570 register for Technion’s first quantum computing summer school”

Melting Time Crystals Could Help Us Model Complex Networks Like The Human Brain

melting time crystals could help us model complex networks like the human brain

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

Passing electricity through a piece of quartz crystal generates a pulse you can literally set your watch by. Set a time crystal melting, on the other hand, and it just might pulse with the deepest secrets of the Universe.
A team of researchers from institutions across Japan has shown the quantum underpinnings of particles arranged as a time crystal could in theory be used to represent some fairly complex networks, from the human brain to the internet, as it breaks down.”In the classical world, this would be impossible as it would require a huge amount of computing resources,” says Marta Estarellas, a quantum computing engineer from the National Institute of Informatics (NII) in Tokyo.”We are not only bringing a new method to represent and understand quantum processes, but also a different way to look at quantum computers.”Ever since they were first theorised in 2012 by Nobel Laureate Frank Wilczek, time crystals have challenged the very fundamentals of physics.His version of this novel state of matter sounds suspiciously like perpetual motion – particles rearranging periodically without consuming or shedding energy, repeating in patterns through time just as run-of-the-mill crystals do through space.This is because the thermal energy shared …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “Melting Time Crystals Could Help Us Model Complex Networks Like The Human Brain”

Quantum Inspired Algorithm Going Back To The Source

quantum inspired algorithm going back to the source

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

Recently, [Jabrils] set out to accomplish a difficult task: porting a quantum-inspired algorithm to run on a (simulated) quantum computer. Algorithms are often inspired by all sorts of natural phenomena. For example, a solution to the traveling salesman problem models ants and their pheromone trails. Another famous example is neural nets, which are inspired by the neurons in your brain. However, attempting to run a machine learning algorithm on your neurons, even with the assistance of pen and paper would be a nearly impossible exercise.
The quantum-inspired algorithm in question is known as the wavefunction collapse function. In a nutshell, you have a cube of voxels, a graph of nodes, or simply a grid of tiles as well as a list of detailed rules to determine the state of a node or tile. At the start of the algorithm, each node or point is considered in a state of superposition, which means it is considered to be in every possible state. Looking at the list of rules, the algorithm then begins to collapse the states. Unlike a quantum computer, states of superposition is not an intrinsic part of a classic computer, so this solving must be done iteratively. In order …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “Quantum Inspired Algorithm Going Back To The Source”