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3D Printing Webinar and Virtual Event Roundup, September 27, 2020 – 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing

3d printing webinar and virtual event roundup, september 27, 2020 – 3dprint.com | the voice of 3d printing / additive manufacturing

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A range of topics will be covered in this week’s roundup of webinars and virtual events, starting with controlled nesting and increased productivity. Moving on, attendees can learn how to maximize CAD software, and then how to scale 3D printing for production purposes. Read on for the details!
Optimizing Controlled Nesting for Build Prep Challenges

Materialise experts Katie Esper and Steven Ostrowski, together with AM Engineer Victor Lopez from the Parker Hannifin Corporation, will discuss how using optimized nesting from the Magics Sinter Module can help solve common build prep stage issues with MJF and SLS 3D printing in a free webinar, “How to Overcome Build Prep Challenges with Controlled Nesting,” on Tuesday, September 29th at 10 am ET. The three speakers will discuss how using the Magics Sinter Module to control the nesting process can allow you to triumph over these challenges, as well as lower costs and streamline the print process.
“Chances are you experience challenges similar to what many others struggle with during the build preparation stage for MJF or SLS. From high costs to fragmented workflows, this step of the printing process has plenty of room to for improvement. Thanks to optimized nesting, you can do …

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Houses 3D-printed in just 24 hours now shipping in California

houses 3d-printed in just 24 hours now shipping in california

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The Mighty Studio can be 3D-printed in 24 hours or less
Mighty Buildings

3D-printed houses aren’t just proof-of-concepts anymore. A company called mighty buildings is already selling and delivering their 3D-printing dwellings in California, with plans to expand into other territories in the future.We’ve covered 3D-printed buildings before, but Mighty Buildings sets itself apart from the competition in a handful of different ways, most obviously with their material.

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While other companies have been using concrete-based printing materials, what Mighty Buildings uses is more of a synthetic stone. The material cures almost instantly under UV light, hence the UV light panels on either side of the print head. Mighty Buildings’ synthetic stone material cures under UV light.
Mighty Buildings
The material cures quick enough to be printed horizontally without support, allowing for the printing of complex shapes and structures.While several companies pursuing 3D-printed construction have been gunning to print a house in 24 hours without interruption, Mighty Buildings co-founder Sam Ruben tells me they’ve achieved it partly because of their prefabricated approach.Instead of doing their printing onsite as …

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Chinese 3D Printing Startup Polly Polymer Raises RMB100 Million

chinese 3d printing startup polly polymer raises rmb100 million

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Suzhou Polly Polymer Technology Co., which focuses on the research and development of new polymer materials and applied to 3D printing use cases, received nearly RMB100 million yuan in a series A financing.
GSR United SDIC Fund-of-Funds jointed led the investment. Zhongxin Innovation and Kehui Venture Capital also participated.
Wang Wenbin, founder of Polly Polymer, said that the company has completed the R&D and pilot trials of mature 3D printing applications in the mass production of terminal parts and products.
This round of financing will be mainly used for the construction of smart factories that can produce 10,000 pairs of shoe midsoles and smart 3D printing in the fields of automobiles, home appliances, medical care, and consumption.
The Chinese 3D printing market is showing a trend of rapid development. According to the research report of CITIC Securities, China’s 3D printing market has achieved a rapid growth of nearly 4.5 times from 2015 to 2020, and its share of the global market has increased from 15% to 22%.
It is expected to be the world’s largest manufacturing base and consumer country in the next 5 years. China will develop rapidly with a compound annual growth rate of over 35% and become the core growth engine of …

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3D-printed nasal swabs work as well as commercial swabs for COVID-19 diagnostic testing, study finds

3d-printed nasal swabs work as well as commercial swabs for covid-19 diagnostic testing, study finds

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As COVID-19 quickly spread worldwide this spring, shortages of supplies, including the nasopharyngeal (nasal) swabs used to collect viral samples, limited diagnostic testing.
Now, a multisite clinical trial led by the University of South Florida Health (USF Health) Morsani College of Medicine and its primary hospital affiliate Tampa General Hospital (TGH) provides the first evidence that 3D-printed alternative nasal swabs work as well, and safely, as the standard synthetic flocked nasal swabs.
The results were published online Sept. 10 in Clinical Infectious Diseases. A commentary accompanying the paper cites the authors’ timely, collaborative response to supply chain disruptions affecting testing capacity early in the pandemic.
Seeking a solution to an unprecedented demand for nasal swabs at their own institution and others, USF Health researchers in the Departments of Radiology and Infectious Diseases reached out to colleagues at TGH; Northwell Health, New York’s largest health care provider; and leading 3D-printer manufacturer Formlabs. Working around the clock, this multidisciplinary team rapidly designed, tested and produced a 3D printed nasal swab prototype as a replacement for commercially-made flocked nasal swabs. Bench testing (24-hour, 3-day, and leeching) using respiratory syncytial virus as a proxy for SARS-CoV-2, as well as local clinical validation of the final …

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ISU professor 3D prints ear savers for surgical masks

isu professor 3d prints ear savers for surgical masks

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Alex Elvis Badillo, an Indiana State University assistant professor of earth and environmental systems, spent the spring semester teaching courses online during the day and, at night in his garage, 3D printing ear savers for surgical masks.The ear savers are meant to reduce tension behind the ear that is caused by typical facemasks. Badillo made them for Vigo County’s frontline workers against COVID-19 after a former student of his, Madeline Riley, a 2019 ISU graduate, suggested the project.“She saw on social media that the online 3D printing community had begun to print out the surgical mask ear saver devices in an effort to contribute to healthcare and essential worker relief during the pandemic,” Badillo said. “Last year, she was involved in my lab, the Geospatial and Virtual Archeology Laboratory and Studio, where she knew that we used 3D printing methods for public outreach and educational purposes. So she brought [the idea] to my attention at first by tagging me on a Facebook post.”
The request piqued Badillo’s interest. He downloaded the National Institutes of Health facemask ear saver files and used free software that translates the information into something the 3D printer can understand. The ear savers …

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Scientists get soft on 3D printing: New method could jump-start creation of tiny medical devices for the body

scientists get soft on 3d printing: new method could jump-start creation of tiny medical devices for the body

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Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a new method of 3D-printing gels and other soft materials. Published in a new paper, it has the potential to create complex structures with nanometer-scale precision. Because many gels are compatible with living cells, the new method could jump-start the production of soft tiny medical devices such as drug delivery systems or flexible electrodes that can be inserted into the human body.
A standard 3D printer makes solid structures by creating sheets of material — typically plastic or rubber — and building them up layer by layer, like a lasagna, until the entire object is created.
Using a 3D printer to fabricate an object made of gel is a “bit more of a delicate cooking process,” said NIST researcher Andrei Kolmakov. In the standard method, the 3D printer chamber is filled with a soup of long-chain polymers — long groups of molecules bonded together — dissolved in water. Then “spices” are added — special molecules that are sensitive to light. When light from the 3D printer activates those special molecules, they stitch together the chains of polymers so that they form a fluffy weblike structure. This scaffolding, still …

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3D Printing News Briefs, September 26, 2020: Nanoscribe, Azul 3D, Arburg – 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing

3d printing news briefs, september 26, 2020: nanoscribe, azul 3d, arburg – 3dprint.com | the voice of 3d printing / additive manufacturing

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In today’s 3D Printing News Briefs, we’re talking about a new material, a little business, and an industry event. Nanoscribe has introduced a new photoresin with special properties for microoptical elements, and Azul 3D is welcoming two new members to its Board of Directors. Finally, Arburg Technology Days has been postponed until 2021.
Nanoscribe’s New IP-n162 Photoresin for 3D Printing
Compound lens system with two refractive elements printed with Nanoscribe’s IP-n162 photoresin. The novel printing material has a high refractive index of 1.62, which expands the opportunities in creating innovative miniaturized optical systems. Printed by Nanoscribe, optical design: Simon Thiele, TTI GmbH TGU Printoptics, Stuttgart.
In order to meet the demand for advanced optical designs, Nanoscribe has launched a new 3D printing material that has special properties for high refractive index microoptics. The novel IP-n162 photoresin was designed specifically for Two-Photon Polymerization (2PP) additive manufacturing, and has a high refractive index of 1.62 at a 589 nm wavelength, combined with a high dispersion that corresponds to a low Abbe number (approximate measure of the material’s dispersion) of 25. It also features a low absorption in the infrared region, and can help Nanoscribe expand opportunities to make highly accurate miniature optical …

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