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3Doodler Pro Plus is a refined version of the 3D-printing pen

3doodler pro plus is a refined version of the 3d-printing pen

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3Doodler’s 3D-printing pens cover a wide range of potential uses, from preschool art projects to high-end professional model making. With the Pro Plus, 3Doodler is attempting to refine that professional offering, changing up how you adjust settings while drawing in 3D and offering more materials in more shapes and sizes to work with.
The Pro Plus is an upgraded version of the 3Doodler Pro, and it carries over a lot of its visual design. When we covered that last version, we noted its streamlined look and more granular controls but were still left skeptical that the company would escape the “toy” association it gained with its other pens. The Pro Plus keeps a lot of what worked with the previous Pro, while slimming down the device by 50 percent and providing improved performance.

These changes don’t come without some potential trade-offs for previous Pro owners who are considering the upgrade, however. The pen loses the physical dials for adjusting settings on the Pro in exchange for buttons next to its digital display, featuring 10 possible temperatures and seven possible speeds for feeding filament through the pen. Buttons make the device simpler, but being forced to click through a menu, rather …

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Local Event: Dream it, Print it – 3D Printing Bootcamp

local event: dream it, print it – 3d printing bootcamp

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This is a 4-week class offered on Mondays in November. The cost per student is $180, $130 for members.Welcome to the world of 3D printing. We will be teaching your students this ins and outs of using a CAD program called Tinkercad. This course will explore the controls and options in Tinkercad available to create original designs. We will review the engineering design process with student, familiarizing them the CAD program, discussing how engineers (and other professionals) use CAD programs and familiarizing them with 3D printer capabilities and limitations. Throughout the course students will make four different designs which will be printed out on our 3D printers and mailed to them at the end of the course. Each week we will review the previous week’s designs to see if they came out as attended and then talk about how they can improve their results. Week 1 – “Getting to know the 3D printer and Tinkercad” Week 2 – “Let’s print!” and “Engraving and embossing” Week 3 – “Translating real world objects in Tinkercad” Week 4 – Advanced controls and “Let’s get creative!” Upon completion of the course, student will have learned the skills necessary to create their own objects in Tinkercad.

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INTAMSYS EMEA receives first order for FUNMAT PRO 610 HT 3D printer

intamsys emea receives first order for funmat pro 610 ht 3d printer

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INTAMSYS‘ Germany-based subsidiary, INTAMSYS Technology GmbH (INTAMSYS EMEA) signed its first order for the INTAMSYS FUNMAT PRO 610 HT printing system that will be installed at a world-class German industry research institute.
As part of the Early Customer Adoption Program(ECAP), INTAMSYS plans to install a limited number of systems in Europe by the end of this year. “We are very excited about the first FUNMAT PRO 610 HT order. This is on one hand a true recognition of the hard work done by our team and on the other hand an acceptance by the market of our strategy to supply industrial customers with high-end 3D production systems to manufacture parts using high-performance plastics such as PEEK and ULTEM ”, said Charles Han, CEO of INTAMSYS.
The 610 HT is a system tailored for additive manufacturing by filament extrusion of high-performance functional materials. It was designed for high-end industrial applications from low to medium volume in specific markets like aerospace, automotive, medical and high tech.
The systems build volume of 610 x 508 x 508mm enables printing large size parts without warpage & delamination. The 3D printer’s extremely high-temperature thermal system includes a 300°C constant temperature chamber and a 500°C extruder with an all-metal hot-end. Using …

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ASU professor awarded $2 million 3DConcrete grant for construction 3D printing

asu professor awarded $2 million 3dconcrete grant for construction 3d printing

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ASU Professor Narayanan Neithalath and four colleagues have been awarded the $2 million 3DConcrete grant from the National Science Foundation to foster collaboration around concrete 3D printing research across more than a dozen countries. Construction 3D printing technology generated these examples shown with Sooraj Nair, a doctoral student in Neithalath’s lab group. The technique offers the potential to change the nature of construction.
This reliable process has been enacted around the world for decades, but the methods of concrete construction may be changing. Recent advances in materials science, robotics and other fields are permitting concrete to be 3D printed at building sites. Projects in Europe and Asia have already printed entire houses.
“3D printing has several advantages over conventional concrete construction,” said Narayanan Neithalath, a professor of civil engineering in the Ira A. Schools of Engineering at Arizona State University. “For example, the method is much more efficient. We can reduce material wastage by half, and we also can create unconventional structures. But realizing the advantages requires a community to research and develop the tools, techniques and standards to make this innovation into a more broad-based reality.”
With a vision to establish that community, Neithalath and four colleagues at other …

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RMIT scientists to use 3D printing to commercialize efficient eco-friendly biofuel production – 3D Printing Industry

rmit scientists to use 3d printing to commercialize efficient eco-friendly biofuel production – 3d printing industry

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An international team of scientists led by RMIT University, has developed a cost-effective method of turning recycled cooking oil, plastic refuse and agricultural waste into eco-friendly biofuels. 
The researchers’ process is based around a novel catalyst, that’s capable of converting highly-contaminated materials into chemical precursors. In addition to creating low-carbon fuel sources, the chemical by-products could be used to produce various medicines and fertilisers as well as biodegradable packaging.
In order to rapidly scale their process, the team now intends to adopt 3D printing technologies, and identify potential partners to commercialize their catalysts with. 
“Our new catalysts can help us get the full value of resources that would ordinarily go to waste,” explained the project’s co-lead investigator, Professor Adam Lee. “From rancid used cooking oil, to rice husks and vegetable peelings, [our catalyst] can advance the circular economy.” 
The researchers’ new sponge-like catalyst (pictured) could enable the production of more efficient biofuels. Image via RMIT University.
Turning vegetable peels into energy sources
It’s no secret that the natural chemicals found in food and polymer-based waste can be turned into renewable energy sources. As the world turns towards more eco-friendly fuels, a number of scientists have already managed …

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MIT researcher creates DefeXtiles textile by harnessing a common 3D printing defect

mit researcher creates defextiles textile by harnessing a common 3d printing defect

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3D printers are exact and are a fantastic way to print complicated parts that couldn’t be built otherwise. However, sometimes 3D printers make mistakes by extruding too much material, too little, or putting material in the wrong spot. Researchers at MIT have harnessed a common 3D printer defect to create a new textile called DefeXtiles.

DefeXtiles is a tulle-like textile created by MIT graduate student Jack Forman created by controlling the under-extrusion of polymer filament, which is a common defect. For those who aren’t familiar with textiles, tulle is a lightweight, very fine, stiff netting made of various types of fiber often used to make veils, gowns, and ballet tutus. Forman used a standard, cheap 3D printer to create the new textile to produce sheets and complex 3D geometries with a woven-like structure using the “glob-stretch” pattern created during under-extrusion.

The flexible sheets were printed into an interactive lampshade, full-sized skirts, and a massive roll of fabric long enough to span a baseball diamond. DefeXtiles is expected to be useful in prototyping and customizing fashion design, but there are other potential future applications for the material. Forman believes applications could include 3D-printed surgical mesh with tunable mechanical properties, …

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Testing PTFE Tube for 3D Printing

testing ptfe tube for 3d printing

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Karl here. I’m back with a short article on some testing that I did on PTFE tube. When I received the Sovol SV02 3D printer it came with some baby blue replacement PTFE tube. It came preinstalled with the regular white stuff that most Bowden style printers come with. I have also been thinking about different ways to use the Retraction Calibration Tool I created. I recommend reading it first to get grounded on what this tool does before going further.I have always heard that Capricorn brand is the best so I purchased some on Amazon. I will test 3 kinds. Generic white, Baby blue Sovol, and Capricorn XS tubing. (Now that I am finding the links to add to the article I see that it is through the Sovol Amazon store. This is just a coincidence.)For the uninitiated, this little tube plays an important role in 3D printing. It provides a filament path from an extruder to the hotend. The theory behind quality is dimensional accuracy and tighter tolerances. Capricorn claims highly accurate tubing with a special blend that is very slippery. This picture captures tolerances very well.Why does this matter? 3D printers have to do …

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Scientists 3D Printed a Soft, Tongue-Like Surface

scientists 3d printed a soft, tongue-like surface

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Scientists have fabricated synthetic soft surfaces, mimicking the texture of the tongue through 3D printing technologies – opening a wide variety of potential applications in food, nutrition, pharmaceutics, and other oral-related studies.
A research team led by scientists from the University of Leeds and the University of Edinburgh in the United Kingdom were able to replicate the complex surface design of a human tongue. They demonstrated in their study that the 3D printed synthetic silicone structure was able to imitate the topology, elasticity, and wettability – or its ability to retain liquids on its surface – of a human tongue.
These are the properties that affect the behavior of saliva or food as it touches the tongue, affecting the sensation in the mouth and the swallowing mechanism, as well as speech and quality of life.
3D Printing a Biomimetic Tongue
One of the urgent and significant applications of a biomimetic tongue, or a synthetic material that emulates the tongue, is in helping overcome the sensory disabilities caused by the global coronavirus pandemic. Sensory trials and consumer tests for experimental medication would see great progress, increasing development productivity for researchers and reducing the pharmaceuticals’ reliance on human trials.
RELATED: Parosmia: A …

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Fusion3 Introduces REACTOR™ 3D Printing Software – MANUFACTUR3D

fusion3 introduces reactor™ 3d printing software – manufactur3d

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Powered by Create It REAL’s REALvision slicing engine, REACTOR delivers exceptional print results, innovative features, and ease of use for Fusion3’ professional 3D printers.
Above: The Fusion3 REACTOR Software example/Image Credit: Fusion3

Fusion3 announces the release of the company’s new REACTOR 3D printing software for use with its line of leading professional FDM 3D printers. Developed in partnership with Create it REAL, REACTOR provides Fusion3’s customers a dedicated, commercial software experience that harnesses the company’s 3D printers’ capabilities and features.
Fusion3’s REACTOR 3D printing software includes the features found in a traditional 3D printing slicer plus several unique features, including:
Streamlined Interface: Easy-to-use interface that guides customers through the core steps to quickly configure the optimal print settings for a successful print. Power users still have access to all the advanced features required for their needs.
Enhanced Print Quality: Performance optimized for Fusion3 3D printers, leveraging Create it REAL’s proprietary adaptive print algorithms to further enhance print quality.

‘Modifiers’: Apply unique settings (weight, strength, and print time) to different sections of a print. The Variable Layer Thickness modifier enables users to optimize print quality in discrete sections of one’s part.
Built-In Certified …

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Chinese scientists develop 3D printed drug-loaded nerve healing bandages – 3D Printing Industry

chinese scientists develop 3d printed drug-loaded nerve healing bandages – 3d printing industry

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Researchers from China’s Sichuan University and Xiamen University have developed 3D printed self-adhesive bandages that are capable of delivering nerve-healing drugs. 
The team’s fabricated gauze comprises two click-activated hydrogel layers and an inner-section which can be loaded with regenerative medicine. Once wrapped around the site of an injured nerve, the device releases the medication in a way that encourages the growth of glial cells in the Peripheral Nervous System (PNS). 
In the future, the scientists believe that their novel 3D printed dressing design, could assist doctors while they carry out widely-used nerve repair operations such as neurorrhaphy. 
The Chinese team’s 3D printed bandage (pictured), proved capable of storing and releasing a cell-enhancing drug payload. Photos via the Advanced Science journal.
New treatments for nerve traumas 
It’s possible to injure a peripheral nerve in a variety of ways, ranging from sporting incidents to illnesses such as tumors, but they are almost always followed by a loss of sensory function in the affected area. Although the PNS has regenerative capabilities and is able to heal itself in certain situations, this is highly dependent on the size and scale of the injury. 
In some cases, neurorrhaphy (a specialized surgery) …

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