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Pandemic-Related Lifestyle Changes Could Affect the Epigenetic Regulation of Your Skin | What is Epigenetics?

pandemic-related lifestyle changes could affect the epigenetic regulation of your skin | what is epigenetics?

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The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the entire world, and many countries have been devastated by the fallout. Asthis virus swept the world, it has not only changed many aspects of the global economy, but also has transformed the way we live our everyday lives.
The skin is one of the major body parts that have been impacted by the coronavirus. It’s apparent that frequent usage of personal protective equipment and excessive personal hygiene could trigger different skin conditions. These skin conditions include rashes, perioral dermatitis, skin pigment change, pressure urticaria, and worsening of pre-existing skin issues like chronic dermatitis, acne and skin wrinkles.
The
changes brought about by the coronavirus pandemic could undoubtedly have a
physical impact on our skin, but they can also affect us on an epigenetic
level. Epigenetics
is the study of heritable modifications that effect gene expression without affecting
the underlying DNA sequence, and it plays a large role in skin health.
Skin issues during the pandemic
Epigenetic changes naturally occur
as you age, and as your skin is exposed to different environments.
Face masks have now become a part of our everyday lives. Increasing evidence
shows that wearing face masks can reduce the risk …

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Reducing the risk of breast cancer through targeted diet and an active lifestyle

reducing the risk of breast cancer through targeted diet and an active lifestyle

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According to researchers from the from the World Cancer Research Fund and the American Cancer Research Institute, the risk of postmenopausal breast cancer is greatly reduced by being physically active and maintaining a healthy body weight. In this 2019 file photo, execise instructor Jennifer Breedlove leads students in a U-Jam classes. less
According to researchers from the from the World Cancer Research Fund and the American Cancer Research Institute, the risk of postmenopausal breast cancer is greatly reduced by being physically active and … more

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According to researchers from the from the World Cancer Research Fund and the American Cancer Research Institute, the risk of postmenopausal breast cancer is greatly reduced by being physically active and maintaining a healthy body weight. In this 2019 file photo, execise instructor Jennifer Breedlove leads students in a U-Jam classes. less
According to researchers from the from the World Cancer Research Fund and the American Cancer Research Institute, the risk of postmenopausal breast cancer is greatly reduced by being physically active and … more

Photo: Courtesy Photo

Reduce the risk of breast cancer through a targeted diet and an active lifestyle

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Breast cancer …

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Healthier lifestyles may increase lifespan even in people with multiple chronic conditions

healthier lifestyles may increase lifespan even in people with multiple chronic conditions

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PLOS Medicine by Yogini Chudasama of the University of Leicester, and colleagues. Credit: Yogini V. Chudasama” width=”800″ height=”480″/>

A very healthy lifestyle is associated with up to 6.3 years longer life for men and 7.6 years for women, regardless of the presence of multiple chronic conditions, according to a study published September 22 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Yogini Chudasama of the University of Leicester, and colleagues. Credit: Yogini V. Chudasama

A very healthy lifestyle is associated with up to 6.3 years longer life for men and 7.6 years for women, regardless of the presence of multiple chronic conditions, according to a study published September 22 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Yogini Chudasama of the University of Leicester, and colleagues. As noted by the authors, to their knowledge, this is the first study to quantify whether the risk of death associated with individual and combined risk factors depends on the presence of multiple chronic conditions.
The number of people living with two or more long-term physical or mental health conditions is rapidly increasing in number worldwide, and they have poorer health outcomes and a higher mortality risk. A healthy lifestyle has been associated with longer life expectancy, but it has not been …

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Daniel Boone Optimist Club recognizes members of class of 2020

daniel boone optimist club recognizes members of class of 2020

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The Daniel Boone Optimist Club recently presented scholarships to four area students graduating in the class of 2020. The club normally holds a dinner to present this awards, but decided on an outdoor event his year. Awards were presented at the slightly modified event to: Elizabeth Moore, who received the $2,000 DBOC Memorial Scholarship; Amanda Johnson, who received the $2,000 James C. Erdman Medical Memorial Scholarship, which is awarded to a student who plans to pursue a career in medicine; Salvatore Chieffo and Courtney Sheckler, who each earned a $1,000 Visual and Performing Arts Scholarship. This scholarship was established this year for students who plan to major in the arts or plan to continue to study and pursue an artistic endeavor.

— Submitted by Rosemary T. Wisniewski

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Pain’s no fun

pain’s no fun

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Pain isn’t fun for any of us, and our furry friends are no exception.The International Veterinary Academy of Pain Management (IVAPM) was established​ in 2001 and has established September as Animal Pain Awareness Month. The annual initiative coincides with human medicine’s Pain Awareness Month and includes outreach and information campaigns aimed at helping to educate pet parents on how to recognize and manage chronic and acute pain.It can be very stressful to see your pet in pain and be unsure about what to do for them. Equally stressful is not knowing IF your pet is in pain. Identifying the (sometimes mysterious) symptoms in our pets is the first step to getting them back on track and doing the things that they love with their family.Whenever humans suffer from pain, we express it in many different ways including holding the stricken area, grimacing, vocalizing distress or posting about it on social media. Animals can also display that they are in pain, though their ways may be a bit different.According to the North American Veterinary Community (NAVC), more than 45 million household pets suffer from chronic or acute pain, but unlike their human counterparts, they cannot tell us …

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AdventHealth Gordon to host virtual Living Well class featuring Julia Danforth, MD

adventhealth gordon to host virtual living well class featuring julia danforth, md

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AdventHealth Gordon is hosting a virtual Living Well class featuring Julia Danforth, MD, on Tuesday, Oct. 13, at 6:30 p.m. online via a Zoom meeting.During this class, participants will learn about year-round gardening. It’s getting cooler outside, but gardening season isn’t over. Participants will learn about vegetables that will grow during the winter and tasks that that will get your garden ready for spring planting.Danforth is a board-certified family physician. She believes that health is more than just the physical body, but mental and spiritual wellness as well. Danforth earned her medical degree from the Loma Linda University School of Medicine in California followed by a residency in family practice at Florida Hospital in Orlando. She is a member of the American Academy of Family Practice and the American College of Lifestyle Medicine. She was board-certified in Lifestyle Medicine in 2017 and is blessed to be able to formally pursue her lifelong career passion.To join this virtual Living Well class, email georgialivingwell@gmail.com to request a Zoom meeting invitation. Participants can use Zoom on their smartphone, computer or tablet. Participants can also dial in with their phone to join the meeting. For more information, call 770-773 …

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PCOS Awareness Month 2020: Simple ways to holistically treat the condition

pcos awareness month 2020: simple ways to holistically treat the condition

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By: Lifestyle Desk | New Delhi |

September 22, 2020 5:30:55 pm

Due to lack of awareness, a majority of women who endure this ailment remain unaware. (Source: Getty Images)Polycystic Ovary Syndrome or PCOS is a complex hormonal and reproductive disorder that affects women. Women suffering from PCOS can experience weight gain, cystic acne, ovarian cysts and excessive hair growth on the face, chest, or other parts of the body, and also irregular menstrual cycles and even infertility.
Dr Rashmi Rai, an integrated lifestyle medicine expert, says, “According to research by the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, it was concluded, at least 1 in 4 women suffer from this hormonal disorder in India. To begin with, there is no single or actual cause of PCOS and the symptoms vary from person to person, hence a more personalised and holistic approach is of utmost importance.”
Below, she shares a few simple ways women can manage the condition in a natural way: 
READ| How Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is diet driven
Keep your stress levels under check 
Women living with PCOS have higher levels of stress because they are adrenal-run. “This leads to higher levels of a hormone called cortisol which is responsible for insulin production and …

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Turning the Tide – How can we make change pleasurable and positive?  – South Coast Herald

turning the tide – how can we make change pleasurable and positive?  – south coast herald

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Last week we introduced the subject of motivation for change and why it is hard for us to change our behaviour. I did a survey of the attitudes towards lifestyle changes of some of the people I care deeply about.  It was quite revealing.  One of the responses was that “I will be willing to take change more seriously if I develop the disease – cure rather than prevention”.  Another was “I’m expecting I’ll have to implement changes as problems are fairly likely to happen”.
ALSO READ : Turning the Tide – Change can bring benefits
The problem is the foods we know are not healthy, and the behaviours we do we know are problematic!  But it is so “nice” to eat those foods, and it is so hard to get off our couches to do some exercise!  We can find a hundred excuses to postpone the inevitable.
The reason that we have an explosion of lifestyle-related diseases in the world is that our media, marketing, “normality” are all geared towards unhealthy behaviours. How do we start?  Sometimes it takes the death of a family member, or the diagnosis of a disease like diabetes, or a heart attack, or cancer in …

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7 steps that can lower your blood pressure as you age

7 steps that can lower your blood pressure as you age

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Want to live a longer, healthier life? One way is to keep your blood pressure at optimal levels as you age — preferably below 120 systolic (the top number) and 80 diastolic (the lower number).That’s especially important during the pandemic, because having high blood pressure is one of the possible risk factors for developing a more severe case of Covid-19, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.You may be able to control your blood pressure, a new study finds, by improving your score on a metric of seven heart-healthy behaviors — doing just one appears to cut hypertension risk by 6% as you age.“High blood pressure is among the most common conditions in the U.S., and it contributes to the greatest burden of disability and largest reduction in healthy life expectancy among any disease,” said Dr. Timothy B. Plante, the lead author of a new study published Wednesday in the Journal of the American Heart Association, in a statement. Plante is an assistant professor in the department of medicine at the Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont in Burlington.Plante and his colleagues followed nearly 3,000 middle-aged Black and White adults without high blood …

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Cardiovascular health similarities between chimpanzees and humans found

cardiovascular health similarities between chimpanzees and humans found

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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Sep 21 2020
Doctors like to remind patients not to monkey around with their health, suggesting that a good diet and regular exercise improve longevity.

A new study on health in chimpanzees, which are the closest species to humans genetically, showed the benefits in what they eat and how they can travel and climb.

When chimpanzees have a plant-based diet and substantial opportunities to exercise, they fall into “healthy” human ranges. Lab chimpanzees, whose diet and exercise were limited, showed conditions indicative of cardiovascular disease risk, more like sedentary people.

Chimpanzees are critical for understanding the evolution of human health and longevity. Cardiovascular disease–a major source of mortality during aging in humans–is a key issue for comparative medicine.

Prior data indicated that compared to humans, chimpanzees have high levels of blood lipids that can promote cardiovascular disease in humans. However, most work on chimpanzee heart health comes from the animals living in laboratories where lifestyles diverge from a wild context.

Researchers from the University of Michigan and University of New Mexico partnered with wildlife veterinarians in Uganda and Congo to examine cardiovascular profiles in chimpanzees living in African sanctuaries. These chimpanzees occupy large rainforest enclosures, consume …

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