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York Hospital to present ‘Fighting the Flu’ webinar on Sept. 30

york hospital to present ‘fighting the flu’ webinar on sept. 30

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(York, ME) Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, reducing the spread of respiratory illnesses, like flu, this fall and winter is more important than ever. To help the community prepare for flu season, York Hospital will host an online forum, “Fighting the Flu,” on Wednesday, September 30, from 12-1 p.m. To join this informative community meeting, sign up via Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/fighting-the-flu-tickets-122089279321.The webinar will be presented in three parts, each led by a different York Hospital clinician:Dr. Jessica Stevens, director of emergency medicine, will talk about the science behind vaccines and how they help to safeguard public health.Dr. Michael Vinograd, lead physician at Pediatric Associates of York Hospital, will focus on pediatric primary care and the importance of keeping childhood immunizations—including flu shots—up to date.Erich Fogg, PA-C, director of walk-in care, will explain several convenient options for obtaining flu shots at York Hospital, including a new Drive-Thru Flu Clinic at York Walk-In Care.The program will conclude with a Q&A period. (Directions for submitting questions in advance will be provided to all attendees via email.) A recording will be available for public viewing on the hospital’s YouTube channel, www. …

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Lifestyle medicine for all: Healthy food comes first – Harvard Health Blog

lifestyle medicine for all: healthy food comes first – harvard health blog

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Latest from Harvard Health

COVID-19 or something else?

Many COVID-19 symptoms—such as fever, cough, or muscle aches—overlap with the symptoms of other respiratory conditions, such as influenza, a common cold, or asthma. But there are differences among the conditions. For example, a bout of the flu or a…

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The mental side of cardiac rehab

Recovery from a heart attack, heart failure, angioplasty, or heart surgery often involves cardiac rehabilitation. While it’s normal to have some anxiety and stress after a heart-related issue, dealing with these issues and treating even more significant problems such as…

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To prevent cancer, boost your exercise and don’t drink

The American Cancer Society says Americans should get more exercise than the previously recommended 150 minutes of moderate exercise each week and skip alcohol entirely to reduce their risk of cancer.

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Lowering blood pressure may help prevent dementia

Even slightly elevated blood pressure in middle age has been linked to a 30% higher risk of dementia two decades later. High blood pressure accelerates atherosclerosis and leaves people prone to an ischemic stroke, which may contribute to vascular dementia.…

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Better Health Through Better Eating

better health through better eating

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PORTSMOUTH, Va. (WAVY) – If you are like many people who have trouble swallowing vitamins, itSpray Vitamins will work for you. Founder Kimberly Stiele joined us on the Hampton Roads Show with all the details on a great way to stay healthy.
itSpray VitaminsAvailable in three different blendsGet yours by visiting itSPRAY.comAnd just for Hampton Roads Show viewersUse promo code “HRS 50” to get 50% off your purchase and free shipping!

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HEALTH BRIEFS: Cape Fear Cancer Specialists welcomes three medical oncologists

health briefs: cape fear cancer specialists welcomes three medical oncologists

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WILMINGTON — NHRMC Physician Group – Cape Fear Cancer Specialists is pleased to announce that three medical oncologists, Swaleh Bahamadi, MD; Anthony Dominick, DO; and Christopher Pizzola, MD, MPH, have joined the practice.Dr. Bahamadi earned his Doctor of Medicine from the University of Nairobi College of Health Sciences in Nairobi, Kenya. Bahamadi completed residency in internal medicine at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine in Tulsa, Oklahoma and a fellowship in hematology and oncology at Wake Forest University School of Medicine in Winston-Salem.Anthony Dominick earned his Bachelor of Science in Biology from Loyola University Chicago and his Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine from Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine in Bradenton, Fla. Dominick completed residency in internal medicine and a fellowship in hematology and oncology at Kansas University Medical Center in Kansas City, Kan. Dr. Dominick has a special interest in benign and malignant hematology.Dr. Pizzola earned his Bachelor of Science in Biology at The College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Va., and his Doctor of Medicine and Master of Public Health from Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine in Richmond, Va. Dr. Pizzola completed residency in internal medicine and a fellowship in hematology and oncology at …

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The geographic bias in medical AI tools

the geographic bias in medical ai tools

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Just a few decades ago, scientists didn’t think much about diversity when studying new medications. Most clinical trials enrolled mainly white men living near urban research institutes, with the assumption that any findings would apply equally to the rest of the country. Later research demonstrated that assumption to be false; examples accumulated of medications that were later determined to be less effective or caused more side effects in populations that were underrepresented in the initial study.
To address these inequities, federal requirements for participation in medical research were broadened in the 1990s, and clinical trials now attempt to enroll diverse populations from the onset of the study.
But we are now at risk of repeating these same mistakes as we develop new technologies, such as AI. Researchers from Stanford University examined clinical applications of machine learning to find that most algorithms are trained on datasets from patients in only three geographic areas, and that the majority of states have no represented patients whatsoever.
“AI algorithms should mirror the community,” says Amit Kaushal, an attending physician at VA Palo Alto Hospital and Stanford adjunct professor of bioengineering. “If we’re building AI-based tools for patients across the …

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6 Myths About The COVID-19 Vaccine, Debunked By Doctors

6 myths about the covid-19 vaccine, debunked by doctors

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Health experts have said that a COVID-19 vaccine is pretty much the only way life will get back to a pre-pandemic “normal,” whatever that means. But like so many other things about the pandemic, the very concept of a vaccine has attracted myths, misconceptions, skepticism, and outright rejection. Whether you’re trying to convince your vaccine-skeptical sister that the COVID-19 vaccine will be safe, or trying to manage the expectations of your BFF who thinks “it’ll just make coronavirus disappear,” it’s good to know all the facts about COVID-19 vaccines — and how to bust the myths.“There is a lot of information out there about a vaccine for COVID-19, but not all of it is correct,” Dr. Seema Sarin M.D., director of lifestyle medicine at EHE Health, tells Bustle. Science reported in June that only around 50% of Americans plan to get a vaccine, and a survey in the UK found 16% of people would avoid getting vaccinated. That’s not great news, and a lot of it is down to myths about vaccination and COVID-19.When the coronavirus vaccine finally debuts, it’ll join a host of vaccines that have saved millions of lives — and attracted their fair share …

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Having high cholesterol levels early in life leads to heart problems by middle age

having high cholesterol levels early in life leads to heart problems by middle age

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Having elevated cholesterol during the teens or early twenties increases a person’s risk of having a heart attack, stroke or other cardiovascular event during middle age. That is the finding a new landmark study led by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM). This increased risk persists even in those who were able to get their cholesterol levels down to a healthy level before reaching their late thirties. The research makes a strong case for doctors to intervene early to treat high levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), the so-called “bad” type of cholesterol, the study authors contend. It also provides guidance for future intervention studies aimed at stemming the worldwide epidemic of heart disease and stroke.
The study, entitled “Time Course of LDL Cholesterol Exposure and Cardiovascular Disease Event Risk”, was published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology and relied on data from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study (CARDIA). This ongoing study, funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, began 35 years ago, recruiting 5,000 young adults aged 18 to 30. It has been tracking this cohort ever since to understand how individual characteristics, lifestyle and environmental …

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