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Wolf announces plan to tackle flooding caused by climate change

wolf announces plan to tackle flooding caused by climate change

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PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — Flash flooding has been a major issue in a number of places throughout the Philadelphia region. Pennsylvania officials are now looking at ways to rectify this problem, which they say is getting worse as a result of the changing climate.

Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf said this summer’s flooding in Darby and Southwest Philadelphia show an urgent need for upgrades to local infrastructure — upgrades that need to reflect the times.

“They were facing problems that are occurring right now, and trying to deal with those problems with infrastructure that was actually put into place back in the 1920s. That’s just not going to work anymore. The world has changed dramatically. Our climate has changed dramatically,” Wolf said.

The state is implementing steps to improve hazard mitigation planning, which include agencies working together when it comes to building new infrastructure.

“The State Planning Board is developing a series of recommendations and best practices relative to land use, to planning zoning, and storm water management with an emphasis on reducing the instance of flash flooding,” Wolf said.

Climate change is real, he added, and steps must be taken to combat it — and it’s not a partisan issue.

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A Race Against Time to Rescue a Reef From Climate Change

a race against time to rescue a reef from climate change

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As soon as the port reopened, they sped to the areas of the reef where they had spent the most time on repairs. Parts were so battered that Dr. García Rivas had trouble recognizing where she was.“I felt powerless,” she said, “confused by so much disaster.” But closer inspection showed that while the reef’s periphery was a mess, some of their work in the center had withstood the second hurricane. “When I saw the fragments that we had glued still standing in place, I had a feeling of hope,” she said.They got to work again.Would anyone buy it?Back in 2015, Kathy Baughman McLeod, who was then director of climate risk and resilience at the Nature Conservancy, asked a profound question: Could you design an insurance policy for a coral reef?On its face, the idea might have seemed absurd. For starters, nobody owns a reef, so who would even buy the policy? And it’s not easy assessing the damage to something that’s underwater.But Ms. Baughman McLeod, along with Alex Kaplan, then a senior executive at Swiss Re, a leading insurance company, came up with workarounds. First, the policy could be purchased by those …

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UK to announce climate target more ‘ambitious’ than the EU

uk to announce climate target more ‘ambitious’ than the eu

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Boris Johnson is set to announce an ambitious climate change target for the UK in the hopes it will prompt other nations to follow suit.The prime minister will pledge on Friday to reduce the UK’s greenhouse gas emissions “faster than any major economy”, which would see a cut by at least 68% of 1990 levels by 2030.This would set the country on course to reach net zero emissions by 2050 – and is a goal more ambitious than the EU is expected to set next week.On December 12, the UK will be co-hosting the Climate Ambition Summit along with the United Nations and France, an event that coincides with the fifth anniversary of the Paris Agreement.The agreement, which is a global pact to avoid devastating effects of climate change, aims to limit global warming to 2 degrees Celsius by the end of the century.It would ideally limit warming to no more than 1.5 degrees Celsius if possible.The United States formally ditched the accord last month under President Donald Trump, but incoming leader Joe Biden has promised to reverse this.According to the Paris Agreement, each country can decide its own pace to reduce emissions and must only report plans and progress …

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Australia received a climate change wake-up call this week — and our health is at stake

australia received a climate change wake-up call this week — and our health is at stake

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For many Australians who have grown up in our “sunburnt country”, last week’s nation-wide heatwave may have felt like business as usual. It’s almost summer, after all.But if you dig into the statistics, the picture that emerges is deeply alarming, especially when considered in light of last year’s devastating bushfires: We’ve just experienced Australia’s warmest November on record. The hottest year on record was 2019, and 2020 continues to track in the same direction. Back-to-back days of 40 degrees-plus in Sydney last week occurred for only the second time in 162 years.Where do heatwaves come from Heatwaves can be deadly and can occur anywhere in Australia. But where do they really come from?Read moreBut it’s not just the environment that’s suffering. Growing numbers of Australians are experiencing health problems, and even an increased risk of death, as a result of a rapidly changing climate.The Medical Journal of Australia/Lancet Countdown on health and climate change this week argued urgent action is needed to prevent human health being further affected. The health impact of climate change has already led to a 53.7 per cent global increase in heat-related mortality between 2010 and 2018, mainly affecting Japan, China, central Europe and northern India. In Australia, …

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2020 may be third hottest year on record, world could hit climate

2020 may be third hottest year on record, world could hit climate

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The relentless rise of carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere – a phenomenon that has continued despite a travel lull during the pandemic – will fuel temperature rise for decades to come. “The average global temperature in 2020 is set to be about 1.2 °C above the pre-industrial (1850-1900) level. There is at least a one in five chance of it temporarily exceeding 1.5 °C by 2024”, WMO Secretary-General Petteri Taalas said in a statement. 
Unwelcome threshold 
The 1.5 degree threshold represents a milestone the world is trying not to reach: the 2015 Paris Agreement on climate change, backed by almost every country on earth, calls for keeping the global temperature to 1.5°C above pre-industrial era levels.  
To slow temperature rises, the world needs radical action. Countries must decrease production of fossil fuels by 6 per cent per year between 2020 and 2030 if the world is to avert “catastrophic” global temperature rise, according to the UN-backed Production Gap Report released on Wednesday. 
In a landmark speech in New York on Wednesday, UN Secretary-General António Guterres said the fight against the climate crisis was the top priority for the 21st Century. 
Climate records have fallen like dominos in the past decade, so notching up merely the third hottest year on record …

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Climate Change Is the Biggest Investment Opportunity Post-Covid, the CEO of RockCreek Says

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Afsaneh Mashayekhi Beschloss is founder and CEO of RockCreek, which manages $15 billion on behalf of pensions, endowments, and foundations, with a focus on multi-asset, sustainable, and emerging-markets strategies

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Meet Biden’s Energy and Climate Cabinet Contenders

meet biden’s energy and climate cabinet contenders

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A nuclear physicist who served as Mr. Obama’s second energy secretary remains in the running to return to his old post. Dr. Moniz, now president and chief executive officer of the Energy Futures Initiative, a research organization, served as an informal adviser to Mr. Biden during the campaign and several people who worked under him at the Energy Department said they would be thrilled to do so again.But Dr. Moniz has detractors. Liberal groups have protested some of the positions he has taken since leaving government, including a post on the board of Southern Company, an electric and gas utility company. They also objected to his endorsements of nuclear energy and carbon capture and storage as ways to fight climate change because they believe climate policy should focus only on renewable sources like wind and solar.Though his biggest legacy is helping to secure the Iran nuclear deal, Dr. Moniz played a key behind-the-scenes role in the Paris Agreement on climate change as well, working to make clean energy a core part of the accord. Under Mission Innovation, a parallel agreement to the Paris deal, 19 nations and the United States agreed to double research and development spending on …

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Climate Change: “Once in a Lifetime” Floods to Become Regular Occurrences by End of Century

climate change: “once in a lifetime” floods to become regular occurrences by end of century

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Sea level rise scenarios have a 50% and 5% chance of exceedance in the mid-twenty-first century (panels a and b) and the late-twenty-first century (panels c and d). Areas in dark and light blue cover flooded areas. Credit: Stevens Institute of Technology
Stevens researcher and colleague find flood levels reached by Superstorm Sandy could be seen in Jamaica Bay every four years by the end of the 21st century.
Superstorm Sandy brought flood-levels to the New York region that had not been seen in generations. Causing an estimated $74.1 billion in damages, it was the fourth-costliest U.S. storm behind Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and hurricanes Harvey and Maria in 2017 according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Now, due to the impact of climate change, researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology have found that 100-year and 500-year flood levels could become regular occurrences for the thousands of homes surrounding Jamaica Bay, New York by the end of the century.
The study, led by Reza Marsooli, assistant professor of civil, environmental and ocean engineering at Stevens, can help policymakers and the coastal municipality of Jamaica Bay make decisions on whether to apply coastal flood defenses or other planning strategies or policies for reducing future …

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