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Kumovis Presents Medical-Grade Polymer Portfolio for 3D Printing at Virtual Events

kumovis presents medical-grade polymer portfolio for 3d printing at virtual events

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More than 10 medical-grade 3D-printing polymers will be showcased by Kumovis GmbH at next month’s virtual.Compamed and Formnext Connect online events. The Munich-based startup claims that its 3D-printing technology can be more cost- and time-efficient than conventional processes, such as milling or injection molding, especially for manufacturing patient-specific medical devices and small series. 

Founded in 2017, Kumovis developed a fused deposition modeling printer, the R1, designed specifically for medical applications. To enable medical technology companies and hospitals to manufacture products in a resource-efficient way, the company continues to expand its range of medical-grade polymers. The portfolio now includes PEEK reinforced with carbon fiber (PEEK CF); PPSU mixed with barium sulfate (PPSU + BaSO4) for improved X-ray visibility; and PEI and resorbable polymers PLLA, PLGA, PCL, and PDO.


Cranioplasty implants fabricated from various polymers on the Kumovis R1 printer. Top row, left to right: PEKK and PPSU (smooth surface). Bottom row, left to right: PEKK, PPSU (surface with structure), and PEEK (smooth surface). Image courtesy Kumovis GmbH.
“Positive response from the industry has been steadily growing since the introduction of the Kumovis R1 series in the summer of 2019,” said Stefan Leonhardt, co-CEO and co-founder of Kumovis. “With this dedicated production system, the …

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Can 3D printing be used to make personal protective equipment?

can 3d printing be used to make personal protective equipment?

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Q: Can 3D printing be used to make personal protective equipment?A: While it is possible to use 3D printing to make certain personal protective equipment, there are technical challenges, and it is unlikely that the equipment will provide the same protection as FDA-approved equipment, according to the Food and Drug Administration.Personal protective equipment includes protective clothing, gowns, gloves, face shields, goggles, face masks and respirators or other equipment designed to protect the wearer from injury or the spread of infection or illness.3D-printed personal protective equipment may provide a physical barrier, but 3D-printed PPE are unlikely to provide the same fluid barrier and air filtration protection as FDA-cleared surgical masks and N95 respirators, the FDA states.If using a 3D-printed face mask, people should check the mask’s seal for leaks, confirm they can breathe through any makeshift filter materials and recognize that the mask may not provide air filtration enough to prevent transmission of infectious agents.

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The industrial 3D printing market is projected to grow USD 2.0 billion in 2020 to USD 5.3 billion by 2025, at a CAGR 20.9% between 2020 and 2025

the industrial 3d printing market is projected to grow usd 2.0 billion in 2020 to usd 5.3 billion by 2025, at a cagr 20.9% between 2020 and 2025

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Factors such as huge investments in 3D printing by start-ups companies, increased focus on high-volume production using 3D printing, high demand for 3D printing software to produce industry-grade parts, and ease in development of customized products, significant demand for online 3D printing are driving the growth of the industrial 3D printing market.New York, Oct. 21, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Reportlinker.com announces the release of the report “Industrial 3D Printing Market by Offering, Application, Process, Technology, Industry And Geography – Global Forecast to 2025” – https://www.reportlinker.com/p03839376/?utm_source=GNW However, the lack of standardization is restraining market growth.Based on offering, services to be the fastest-growing segment between 2020 and 2025.Based on offerings, the industrial 3D printing market has been segmented into printers, materials, software, and services.The demand for services is expected to grow rapidly as most manufacturers are prototyping or manufacturing parts on demand.Most of the top players offering 3D printers also offer on-demand printing services, which would further boost the market for industrial 3D printing services.Based on technologies, electron beam melting to be the fastest-growing technology between 2020 and 2025.Based on technologies, the industrial 3D printing market has been segmented into stereolithography, fused deposition modeling, …

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Eindhoven researcher develops early-stage closed-loop control system for SLA 3D printing – 3D Printing Industry

eindhoven researcher develops early-stage closed-loop control system for sla 3d printing – 3d printing industry

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Thomas Hafkamp, a Ph.D. researcher at Eindhoven University of Technology, is developing a novel closed-loop control system for additive manufacturing.
Detailed in his thesis titled ‘Towards closed-loop control in photopolymer-based additive manufacturing’, Hafkamp’s work focuses on the resin-based SLA process. The work stems from the fact that most 3D printers today do not utilize sensor data to correct print jobs in real-time, essentially operating on an open-loop whereby the predefined print parameters determine the quality and success of the part.
The ideal closed-loop control system. Image via the Eindhoven University of Technology.
The power of the feedback loop
While the SLA systems of 2020 are more sophisticated than they’ve ever been, there is still the ongoing issue of print failures. It takes a great deal of skill and experience (and luck) to fabricate a part perfectly on the first run, calling for what is essentially a trial-and-error approach. In the words of Hafkamp, you cannot “CTRL + P and have a defect-free product roll out of the 3D printer”.
Feedback loops, or closed-loops, could be the answer to this, using sensor data and intelligent algorithms to counteract disturbances that would otherwise result in the deterioration of a part’s …

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Eaton Launches New Metal 3D Printing Program to Reduce Development Time, Improve Efficiency

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Power management company Eaton today announced its Vehicle Group is implementing a new 3D metal printing program as a part of its Industry 4.0 strategy to reduce development time and improve efficiency. The first metal printer system was installed at the Kings Mountain, N.C., facility, and a global deployment of 3D polymer printing technology is slated to be completed by first-quarter 2021.This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201021005571/en/ Eaton’s Vehicle Group reduced cost and development time using its 3D metal printing capabilities to produce this oil fill nozzle. (Photo: Business Wire)The 3D printers are being utilized to create high-quality fixtures, safety devices, automation grippers for assembly and handling, and maintenance components requiring replacement. Prototype development is following the same strategy to support faster product development trials and improve efficiency.Improving output and efficiencyTo speed up the design process, scanners are used to create 3D models of existing components. This process allows components to be reverse-engineered to better leverage 3D printing capabilities, including changing component design to use less material, the addition of different topography elements or consolidating multiple components into a single part.As an increasing number of 3 …

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Additive Drives to 3D Print Better Electric Engines with AM Ventures Investment – 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing

additive drives to 3d print better electric engines with am ventures investment – 3dprint.com | the voice of 3d printing / additive manufacturing

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German electric motor components company Additive Drives GmbH has received a “seven-digit seed investment from AM Ventures.” Presumably, that would mean that they got at least a €10,000.10 investment? Or perhaps they mean that they got an investment of at least €1 million? Or perhaps it could have been €9 million, or maybe nearly €10, although that seems a bit much for a seed investment. Let’s hope for everyone’s sake that they were clearer on the term sheet than the press release.

The primary goal of Additive Drives is to 3D print copper coils, the key part of electric motors, with marketable products next year. The company points out that manufacturing prototypes for electric motors can take up to seven months, due to the making and setting up of complex winding tools needed for the process. 3D printing, however, can yield copper prototypes in just a few days, speeding up test cycles and market maturity time. In tandem with a production network, the entire electric motor can be prototyped in just a short period of time. According to Additive Drives co-founder Axel Helm, the firm is able to achieve 100% electrical conductivity based on the International Annealed Copper Standard.

Additive Drives achieves this 100% …

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Hybrid 3D Printing Technique Creates Plastic-Metal Structures All at Once – 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing

hybrid 3d printing technique creates plastic-metal structures all at once – 3dprint.com | the voice of 3d printing / additive manufacturing

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Until now, metal and plastic additive manufacturing technologies have been incompatible with each other because their melting points are very different. Moreover, current 3D printers employ either plastic or metal only, and the conventional method to metal coat 3D plastic structures is not environment-friendly and yields poor results. Now, researchers at Waseda University in Japan have developed a novel and simple method to 3D print structures made of both metal and plastic thanks to a custom-made thermoplastic and commercially available fused filament fabrication (FFF) printer. This new hybrid 3D printing technique could extend the use of 3D printers to 3D electronics for future robotics and Internet-of-Things (IoT) applications.
According to a study published in the journal Additive Manufacturing, a group of scientists led by Shinjiro Umezu, Professor at Waseda University’s Department of Modern Mechanical Engineering, created a new technology capable of metalizing selected areas of 3D printed plastic structures. The 3D structure was manufactured using a dual extrusion Ultimaker S3 3D printer. One nozzle extruded the standard melted plastic acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), whereas the other nozzle extruded a custom-fabricated ABS filament loaded with the precious metal catalyst palladium chloride (PdCl2).
By selectively printing layers using one nozzle or …

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How Might 3D Printing Give Rise to Movable Factories? – 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing

how might 3d printing give rise to movable factories? – 3dprint.com | the voice of 3d printing / additive manufacturing

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The recent COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the value of additive manufacturing (AM) as a potential stop-gap measure to overcome suddenly clogged supply lines, while also demonstrating the possibility of a distributed method of manufacturing with implications for re-shoring and localizing production. However, what if that is only the beginning of the picture being painted by 3D printing? What if AM disrupts production to the extent that movable factories come to replace permanent ones, creating an unpredictable changes for national boundaries and financial structures? Bear with me here.
As we stumble from crisis to crisis, we seem to have come upon a time of increased uncertainty. The bedrock of this century, the Pax Americana and the US dominance of global finance and political institutions such as the World Bank, UN, and IMF seem to be under threat. US institutions that extended their influence on a generally obliging world, such as the US central bank, the dollar, the CDC, FDA, SEC, and FAA, also appear weaker than they have ever been.
From one Communism versus Capitalism fault line, we have entered a mediascape minefield characterized by shards of truth and lack of understanding, where …

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HRL Laboratories develops new method of 3D printing fracture-resistant ceramic matrix composites – 3D Printing Industry

hrl laboratories develops new method of 3d printing fracture-resistant ceramic matrix composites – 3d printing industry

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Researchers from HRL Laboratories, a research center owned by General Motors and Boeing, have developed a novel method of 3D printing parts using fracture-resistant Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs). 
The HRL team developed a novel siloxane-based preceramic resin, reinforced it with inert particles, then used an extreme heating process called pyrolysis to convert it into silicon oxycarbide (SiOC). The resulting glassy material featured enhanced durability, and according to the research team, it could be used within new energy sensitive areas such as propulsion, energy generation, and chemical processing. 
“The challenge we addressed in this project was integrating this toughening solution with our 3D printing process,” said Mark O’Masta, HRL’s lead researcher on the project. “We can now add these reinforcements in large-volume fractions to significantly toughen our 3D printed ceramic parts.”
“We’ve essentially made a brittle monolithic material into a durable composite. As an extra benefit, adding reinforcements relaxed some of the processing constraints.” 
The researchers developed preceramic polymers that could be used to reinforce complex 3D printed ceramic structures. Photo via HRL Laboratories.
Expanding upon the applications of 3D printed ceramics
Ceramic components typically possess excellent resistance to corrosion and wear, and their unique properties lend them …

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Lockheed picks Relativity’s 3D printed rocket for NASA Tipping Point selection

lockheed picks relativity’s 3d printed rocket for nasa tipping point selection

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NASA and industry have developed and tested numerous technologies to enable long-term cryogenic fluid management, which is essential for establishing a sustainable presence on the Moon and helping crewed missions to Mars. For example, this 13-foot diameter cryogenic storage test tank evaluated technologies to reduce the evaporation or “boil off” propellant losses. Implementation of similar technologies in operational missions requires further maturation through in-space demonstrations.
Credits: NASA

Lockheed Martin picked Relativity for the NASA Tipping Point mission. Relativity signed a contract with Lockheed to provide its rockets for a particularly complex mission Lockheed is undertaking for NASA’s Tipping Point program. While Relativity has not yet flown any fully 3D printed rocket, its technology promises to produce rockets in days instead of months once the development process will have been completed).
“The mission – Tech Crunch’s Devin Coldewey reports – “is a test of a dozen different cryogenic fluid management systems, including liquid hydrogen, which is a very difficult substance to work with indeed. The tests will take place on a single craft in orbit, which means it will be a particularly complicated one to design and accommodate.
“The payload itself—the article goes on—and its cryogenic systems will be …

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