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Your Views: Climate change crisis lurks on horizon

your views: climate change crisis lurks on horizon

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Roger Cohen wrote wise words in a recent op-ed, “Do things differently at the other end of this scourge, some mystic voice murmurs, do them more equitably, more ecologically, or you will be smitten again.”The invading aliens, in The War of the Worlds, succumbed to earthly pathogens to which they had no immunity. Today, a virus to which we have no immunity has killed more than 350,000 people worldwide. This invasion was no surprise. Worldwide plagues occur at regular intervals.Bill Gates talked about our need to be prepared for such a pandemic in a TED talk five years ago. He began his talk by saying the greatest world catastrophe will not be a mushroom shaped cloud but rather something so small we need an electron microscope to see it.We have spent $5 trillion on wars since 2001. We spend over $700 billion a year on defense. The eighteen F-35 fighter jets to be based in Madison have a price tag of $1.8 billion. All this defense spending did nothing to defend us from this pandemic which has now killed more than 100,000 Americans. Terrorist caused deaths in the United States including those of 9/11 are 3,300.Do something different at the end of this scourge, …

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People with Disabilities Needed in Fight Against Climate Change

people with disabilities needed in fight against climate change

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People with disabilities are at increased risk of the adverse impacts of climate change – including threats to their health, food security, water, sanitation, and livelihoods – the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights said in a recent report. The report, the result of a historic resolution adopted by the Human Rights Council last July, examines the impacts of climate change on the rights of people with disabilities and makes recommendations about states’ human rights obligations in the context of climate action.   People with disabilities make up an estimated 15 percent of the global population. Due to discrimination, marginalization, and certain social and economic factors, people with disabilities may experience the effects of climate change differently and more intensely than others.Take, for example, climate displacement. Climate change exacerbates extreme weather events, which is one of the factors driving increased migration in recent years. Because the ability to migrate often depends on resources and mobility, marginalized populations – such as people with disabilities – might be unable to travel and so forced to remain in degraded environments without housing, employment, support networks, or health care services.People with disabilities also experience poverty at more than twice the rate of people without disabilities. This puts …

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As big economies plan to start up, climate change is at a crossroad

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As countries begin rolling out plans to restart their economies after the brutal shock inflicted by the coronavirus pandemic, the three biggest producers of planet-warming gases — the European Union, the United States and China — are writing scripts that push humanity in very different directions.

Europe this week laid out a vision of a green future, with a proposed recovery package worth more than $800 billion that would transition away from fossil fuels and put people to work making old buildings energy-efficient.

In the United States, the White House is steadily slashing environmental protections and Republicans are using the Green New Deal as a political cudgel against their foes.

China has given a green light to build new coal plants but it also declined to set specific economic growth targets for this year, a move that came as a relief to environmentalists because it reduces the pressure to turn up the country’s industrial machine quickly.

What course these giant economies set is crucial if the world is to have a fighting chance to head off the blistering heat, droughts and wildfires that are the hallmarks of a fast-warming planet.

Just as their recovery plans are taking shape, though, the political pressure …

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Climate change is nonpartisan

climate change is nonpartisan

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In his letter of May 11, Tom Teune criticizes Jeanne Ives for politicizing the issue of climate change on her campaign website. Ms. Ive’s website, of course, criticizes Rep. Sean Casten for doing the same. Sadly, we live in hyperpartisan times in which incessant political bickering stops us from solving urgent challenges.
Climate change should not be a partisan issue. Carbon dioxide, sunlight and the greenhouse effect know nothing about political ideologies. They simply act as they do. The result is that the Earth’s climate is warming due to the massive amounts of fossil fuels burned since the start of the Industrial Revolution. 97% of climate scientists accept this as fact. Perhaps we should too. The impacts of climate change are here now and they affect all of us equally regardless of our political affiliations.






        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        



Mr. Teune wrote, “I am lost to find a conservative concerned about the degradation of the environment that the Trump administration is causing.” With respect to climate change, I suggest that both he and Ms. Ives watch Bob Inglis’ TEDxJacksonville talk on YouTube in which he describes his conversion from climate denial to ardently supporting bipartisan climate action. A former six-term conservative representative from South Carolina, Mr. …

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Between the Rows: Researchers examine climate change perception among specialty-crop producers

between the rows: researchers examine climate change perception among specialty-crop producers

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UNIVERSITY PARK — Farmers whose operations have been impacted negatively by changing precipitation patterns — either too much or not enough water — are more likely to acknowledge the link between extreme weather conditions and climate change. That is one of the findings of a study examining farmers’ perceptions of resource availability and climate change, published recently in Organization and the Environment.“Agriculture has increasingly been affected by weather disruptions linked to climate change over the past four decades,” said Leland Glenna, professor of rural sociology and science, technology, and society in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences.

“Droughts, flooding, changing temperatures and crop losses due to insects and disease are more prevalent than ever before. Despite the threat, many producers do not acknowledge that climate change is occurring, or that it is caused by humans.”That presents a challenge, he pointed out, because acknowledging that human behavior, climate change and increasingly extreme weather are interconnected is key to climate adaptation and mitigation efforts.“If agricultural producers perceive climate change and resource problems — water availability in this case — differently, it is important to explain the underlying socioeconomic factors and market structures that lead to this divergence,” Glenna said.He and Yetkin Borlu, …

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Rate of climate change in deep waters of the ocean could be to be seven times faster by 2050 even if we reduce emissions- Technology News, Firstpost

rate of climate change in deep waters of the ocean could be to be seven times faster by 2050 even if we reduce emissions- technology news, firstpost

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The results also showed that no amount of carbon emission reduction can reverse the rate of change that has already taken place.

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Shareholders urge Chevron, Exxon to report climate change health risks

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Shareholders pushed Chevron Corp. and Exxon Mobil Corp. on Wednesday to report on climate change-related public health risks of petrochemical operations and welcomed an announcement by Southern Co. that it has set a goal of net-zero carbon emissions by 2050.The actions happened at the companies’ respective annual meetings Wednesday. According to preliminary results, 46% of investors voted to support a shareholder resolution at Chevron and 25% voted to support a similar one at Exxon. Filed by shareholder advocacy group As You Sow, the resolutions call for Exxon and Chevron to report on the public health risks of expanding their petrochemical operations in areas increasingly prone to climate change-induced storms, flooding, and sea level rise. The same proposal received a majority 54.7% vote at Phillips 66 earlier this month.As You Sow President Danielle Fugere said efforts to have the companies report on future plans to reduce their carbon footprint have been challenged by Exxon and Chevron, which “continue to give lip service to the goals of the Paris Agreement, while failing to clarify for investors if or how they will reduce their emissions in alignment with the Paris Agreement’s critical 1.5 degree Celsius goal,” Ms. Fugere said in a statement.Shareholders at Southern Co.’s …

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Green alert: How indigenous have been experiencing climate change in the Amazon

green alert: how indigenous have been experiencing climate change in the amazon

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Late rainfall, intense drought, dry riverbeds, more forest fires, less food available — indigenous communities across the Brazilian Amazon suffer social transformations due to climate change.Indigenous people believe that climate change has even affected their physical health: previously controlled diseases like measles and yellow fever, they say, have inexplicably reappeared in the rainforest, and even indigenous women’s menstrual cycles are beginning at an earlier age.Indigenous people have found many ways to take action and lessen the harm. These approaches include selecting and growing seeds that are more resistant to drought and heat, investing in frontline firefighters and even a smartphone app that offers information about climatic variations. Antônio Veríssimo Apinajé recalls his life as a boy in Taquari village in northern Tocantins state, Brazil, in the 1970s. “It would rain without stopping for three or four days in a row, from January to June. The rivers and springs would fill up. The rainy season would begin in October, when my family would plant manioc, corn and rice. In June, the dry season would come, which lasted until September.”
But not anymore, says the leader of the Apinajé indigenous people. “There are years in which the rains take …

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Climate Change Burns Its Way Up the Pop Charts

climate change burns its way up the pop charts

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Welcome to the Climate Fwd: newsletter. The New York Times climate team emails readers once a week with stories and insights about climate change. Sign up here to get it in your inbox. Image By This year, I came up with the idea to analyze the frequency of climate change references in American popular music. Culture can be a bellwether, both signaling where we are heading and, occasionally, helping to steer society’s course. And while, anecdotally, it seemed that climate change has been appearing more frequently in music, I wanted to put numbers to it.I looked at lyrics from a set of songs that the lyric hub Genius identified as containing climate change themes (based on search terms I had provided). And I compared the artists on that list with the Billboard charts, selecting only those who had appeared on domestic charts in the past two decades.I counted at least 192 references to climate change, 26 of which appeared just last year. For an article, I pared that down to 10 influential songs and spoke with some of the artists.[If you’re already signed up for the Climate Fwd: newsletter, good move. Why not follow the New York Times …

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Researchers examine climate change perception among specialty-crop producers

researchers examine climate change perception among specialty-crop producers

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Credit: CC0 Public Domain

Farmers whose operations have been impacted negatively by changing precipitation patterns—either too much or not enough water—are more likely to acknowledge the link between extreme weather conditions and climate change.

That is one of the findings of a study examining farmers’ perceptions of resource availability and climate change, published recently in Organization and the Environment.
“Agriculture has increasingly been affected by weather disruptions linked to climate change over the past four decades,” said Leland Glenna, professor of rural sociology and science, technology, and society in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences.
“Droughts, flooding, changing temperatures and crop losses due to insects and disease are more prevalent than ever before. Despite the threat, many producers do not acknowledge that climate change is occurring, or that it is caused by humans.”
That presents a challenge, he pointed out, because acknowledging that human behavior, climate change and increasingly extreme weather are interconnected is key to climate adaptation and mitigation efforts.
“If agricultural producers perceive climate change and resource problems—water availability in this case—differently, it is important to explain the underlying socioeconomic factors and market structures that lead to this divergence,” Glenna said.
He and Yetkin …

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