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Health Matters: Long-Term High Cholesterol Can Affect Your Long-Term Health

health matters: long-term high cholesterol can affect your long-term health

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Cholesterol – the waxy substance found in your blood and produced naturally by your liver– is essential to building healthy cells.
But high levels of the substance can lead to fatty deposits and blockages that make it difficult for blood to flow through your arteries.
Over time, this reduced blood flow can cause damage throughout your body, and the longer it goes undetected and untreated, the more damage will be done.
Yet once diagnosed, high cholesterol can usually be managed through lifestyle changes, medication, or a combination of both.
A Silent Disease
High cholesterol is considered a silent disease because it does not cause any outward symptoms.
However as fatty deposits—also knowns as plaques—build up, it causes your arteries to narrow and harden, preventing blood from flowing freely and lessening the amount of oxygen and other nutrients delivered throughout your body.
High cholesterol increases your risk for peripheral artery disease and can cause memory problems, nervous system disruptions, and even digestive problems.
At the same time, pieces of plaque can break off suddenly and travel throughout the bloodstream, potentially causing a blockage or clot.
The longer high cholesterol goes untreated, the greater the risk for heart disease and stroke, …

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How to lose weight after 40, according to experts

how to lose weight after 40, according to experts

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Once you hit 40, losing weight can feel like a lost cause. Dr. Robert Kushner, director of the Center for Lifestyle Medicine at Northwestern Medicine Center in Chicago and author of “Six Factors to Fit: Weight Loss that Works for You,” told TODAY that the total amount of calories burned every day diminishes for most people with each passing decade.“Our metabolism slows due to reduced muscle mass, and our daily physical activities, particularly the time spent in exercise, declines,” said Kushner. “If these biological changes are not met with a corresponding reduction in dietary calories, we will experience a slow and steady increase in our body weight.” Oct. 13, 202003:01Still, losing weight after you hit 40 isn’t impossible. Here are five expert-backed ways to tackle mid-life weight loss.1. Tweak your dietTo adjust to your body’s slowing metabolism, it’s important to be aware of the calories you consume, said Kushner. He explained that choosing nutritious foods with fewer calories per bite will still help you feel full and satisfied.“Instead of eating less of everything and feeling deprived, you want to replace more calorie-dense foods, such as fried foods, high-fat meats, cookies, cakes, candies (and) chips, with nutrient-rich, less calorie-dense …

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How Are Texas Experts Spending Thanksgiving?

how are texas experts spending thanksgiving?

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Some of Texas’ top experts and innovators share how they are spending Thanksgiving by adapting traditions and finding new ways to celebrate.

Douglas W. Curran, M.D., past president of the Texas Medical Association and family physician based in Athens, TX

Our family as always will meet outside for a Turkey Trot. We will be wearing masks and appropriate social distancing. This year, it is not about finishing in first place, but rather about being outside and safe.

Our family plans include a dinner and a hayride in the pasture near our home. All activities are outside as the weather in our area allows outdoor functions. Most important, we are well and aware of what it takes to stay safe. We plan to model the safe behavior of masking, social distancing, and keeping clean hands. By following scientific proven safeguards, it will allow us to return to normal activities and reflect on this year as a special time of challenge. Of which, we will meet head on and conquer.

LeChauncy Woodard, M.D., M.P.H., director of the Humana Integrated Health System Sciences Institute at the University of Houston and a UH College of Medicine professor.

Like many this …

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John Patrick University (JPU) of Health and Applied Sciences Setting the Standard in Cannabinoid Medical Sciences Education and Training

john patrick university (jpu) of health and applied sciences setting the standard in cannabinoid medical sciences education and training

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SOUTH BEND, Ind., Nov. 25, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — JPU is pleased to announce that it will be offering a Master’s Degree in Integrative & Functional Medicine with a Concentration in Cannabinoid Medical Sciences starting in January 2021. The Cannabinoid Medical Sciences concentration is designed to foster understanding and a rational perspective for science-based healthcare providers, practitioners, educators, manufacturers, cultivators, and business operators.  JPU’s faculty in this program consists of physicians, nurses, nutritionists, scientists, and data analytic specialists.  JPU caters to the working professional with flexible and accelerated online programs.

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John Patrick University of Health and Applied Sciences

Michael Dubanewicz, Ed.D., CN, CCN, CFM, CDM, CFPP, Dean of the School of Integrative and Functional Medicine, notes “JPU is leading the change and future of health education to provide evidence-base study of cannabinoid medical sciences. Our curriculum provides both applied and clinical application of cannabinoids and its function within integrative health science.” 

Mary Clifton, MD, Medical Director, is a board-certified, licensed, internal medicine doctor, and a recognized expert in cannabinoids and the endocannabinoid system. “This program will prepare you to give the most informed health advice to your patients and clients, helping them to receive the absolute best care available.”
Janice Newell Bissex, …

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Medicaid coverage is not enough to manage diabetes, shows study

medicaid coverage is not enough to manage diabetes, shows study

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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Nov 25 2020
Medicaid expansion through the Affordable Care Act has insured millions of low-income people in the United States, improving outcomes for patients with many different diseases.

But expansion alone has not been enough to improve outcomes for patients with diabetes, according to a new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study.

Published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, the study finds an increase in insurance coverage, ability to see a physician, and foot examinations among patients with diabetes in states that expanded Medicaid.

However, the study did not find significant changes in follow-up examinations, care, or treatment for diabetes, pointing to the need for other structural changes.

“There are likely many steps between having health insurance and successfully getting treatment for diabetes–including providers needing to recognize the importance of screening and patients needing to implement rigorous lifestyle changes,” says study lead author Dr. Lily Yan, who was a master of science in population health student at BUSPH while working on the study and is now a global health research fellow at Weill Cornell Medicine.

“While having health insurance through a program like Medicaid expansion may be necessary for better health, it may …

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American College of Lifestyle Medicine Launches Bill of Rights to Raise Awareness of Lifestyle Medicine’s Role in Type 2 Diabetes Informed Consent and Treatment

american college of lifestyle medicine launches bill of rights to raise awareness of lifestyle medicine’s role in type 2 diabetes informed consent and treatment

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A patient with type 2 diabetes does not give fully informed consent if a Lifestyle Medicine option is not presented.

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The Bill of Rights is a companion to ACLM’s recently launched “Reversing Type 2 Diabetes and Insulin Resistance with Lifestyle Medicine” 18-hour, 20-module, evidence-based CME/CE accredited online course for physicians and health professionals. This is the first comprehensive educational curriculum offered to equip physicians and other health professionals to treat and reverse type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance.  In addition, ACLM recently published a position paper, “Type 2 Diabetes Remission and Lifestyle Medicine: A Position Statement from the American College of Lifestyle Medicine.” ACLM will also present a free webinar, “The Reversibility of Type 2 Diabetes with Lifestyle Medicine—Q & A” on Thursday, Nov. 12 at 12 p.m. CST.

ACLM defines Lifestyle Medicine as the use of an evidence-based, whole food, plant-predominant dietary lifestyle, regular physical activity, restorative sleep, stress management, avoidance of risky substances and positive social connection as a primary therapeutic modality for treatment, reversal and prevention of chronic disease. Addressing lifestyle is the first step in type 2 diabetes and other chronic disease treatment and management guidelines, but it has been overlooked due to a lack of physician training in lifestyle, …

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Three Farm Daughters launches new product portfolio powered by GoodWheat

three farm daughters launches new product portfolio powered by goodwheat

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Arcadia Biosciences, Inc., a leader in science-based approaches to food ingredients, and Three Farm Daughters, LLLP, a family-run company, have launched their first product lines using Arcadia’s patented non-GMO GoodWheat branded ingredients. 

The new Three Farm Daughters brand products powered by GoodWheat are grown, milled and packaged in the U.S. and deliver natural nutrition straight from the farm. The new products include:

* Artisan Linguine Pasta, Fusilli Pasta, and Fettuccine Pasta. Offering 9 grams more fiber per 2 ounce serving than traditional pasta and nine grams of protein per serving, these gourmet, handmade, certified kosher pastas are 150 calories per serving.* 100% Wheat Flour. High in fiber with 50% less gluten and 30% fewer calories, this wheat flour includes no fillers, no dyes and is non-enriched. 

These products are now available online and are also at Hugo’s Family Marketplace in North Dakota and Minnesota. Check here for recipes.

Strategic Partnership

Sales of baking staples such as flour, baking powder, baking soda and yeast through online e-commerce and grocery stores throughout the United States have been at an all-time high during the COVID-19 pandemic, and families are increasingly preparing meals at home while looking for products with superior nutrition profiles. Shelf-stable pantry categories are experiencing 19% …

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Several physicians applied to be Ohio’s next health director. DeWine hired a lawyer

several physicians applied to be ohio’s next health director. dewine hired a lawyer

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Nearly a dozen physicians — including two short-term state public health directors — applied to become director of the Ohio Department of Health amid the COVID-19 crisis, the worst pandemic to gut America in more than a century.Gov Mike DeWine, who stressed public health experience when he appointed former health director Dr. Amy Acton in 2019, chose Stephanie McCloud, a lawyer and director of the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation, on Nov. 5 to lead the department.McCloud’s selection came after Dr. Joan Duwve, South Carolina public health director, agreed to become Ohio’s director on Sept. 10, only to quit hours later amid concern for her family after protesters targeted the home of Acton, who resigned Aug. 4.MORE: DeWine appoints McCloud new Ohio health directorMore:Ohio ’health director’ hired, quit without exchanging a word in writing with stateA public records request by The Dispatch found that several medical professionals applied to become the Ohio health director before and after Duwve’s reversal and the governor’s ultimate choice of McCloud.A governor’s office spokeswoman declined to comment on which applicants were interviewed and whether any were considered finalists for the job.Among the applicants:Dr. Eli Avilia, a lawyer, supervising occupational medicine physician at an Army …

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Turning the Tide – Lifestyle Medicine and its contribution to health(1)

turning the tide – lifestyle medicine and its contribution to health(1)

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Color changes in fingers, toes may be first sign of Raynaud’s syndrome

color changes in fingers, toes may be first sign of raynaud’s syndrome

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katleho Seisa/iStockBy DR. MOLLY STOUT, ABC News(NEW YORK) —  Blue, white and red are not just the colors we’ve been seeing everywhere due to the recent U.S. election — you may be seeing these colors on your fingers and toes due to the cooling temperatures. It’s a medical condition called Raynaud’s syndrome.
Although Raynaud’s is not life-threatening, if you notice your fingers or toes turning red, white and blue this winter, you should speak to your dermatologist. For some, Raynaud’s is the first sign of an underlying illness, and there may be lifestyle changes and medical treatments that can help.
What is Raynaud’s syndrome?
Raynaud’s occurs when blood vessels in the fingers or toes suddenly narrow or spasm, leading to a blue discoloration, followed by a sharply demarcated pale white discoloration, and finally, a red discoloration. It can often be symmetric, affecting fingers on both hands. The phenomenon was first described by the 19th century French medical student Maurice Raynaud.
“It’s really an exaggerated cold response: When our body is cold it’s normal for our blood vessels at the periphery, such as in our fingers, to narrow to conserve core …

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