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Our Town: A delicate dance between arts and science – The Sopris Sun

our town: a delicate dance between arts and science – the sopris sun

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The Sopris Sun is conducting a series of interviews with folks you may not have seen in the paper before – a sort of introduction to your neighbors. This week we caught up with Leila Milanfar, a current ArtistYear fellow at Carbondale Middle School who is also currently offering tutoring services to students in the Roaring Fork Valley (email leilamilanfar@gmail.com for scheduling and more info.)
Q: Where are you from?

A: I am from Menlo Park, California. . I went to Duke University, and just graduated this past May. I applied for the AmeriCorp job, and now I’m here in Colorado!
Q: What AmeriCorp program are you volunteering for this year?

A: The program I am doing is called ArtistYear. It is a nonprofit that focuses on giving citizen artists a chance to do meaningful service for the nation. So what we’re doing is bridging the arts education gap in schools that don’t have a ton of arts funding. 
I live in a house with four other AmeriCorp fellows and all of us are different types of artists. Right now I am in an English development class with Mrs. Grace De La Sala. Basically, what I do …

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Troubles escalate at Ecuador’s dream research university

troubles escalate at ecuador’s dream research university

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Yachay Tech University, launched in 2014, drew faculty from around the world to its brand new campus.

MEDIOS PÚBLICOS EP/FLICKR CC BY-SA

By Lindzi Wessel, Rodrigo Pérez Ortega Oct. 21, 2020 , 3:55 PM

It was supposed to become Ecuador’s dream research university—an international hub for science and higher education, able to recruit top talent from around the world. Instead, 6-year-old Yachay Tech University, nestled in the mountains 2 hours north of Quito, has long been mired in conflicts. Now, Ecuador’s economic woes and shifting politics have stirred new turmoil that threatens the university’s drive for “independent” status, which would allow it to run its own affairs.

The past year, dozens of professors were fired or left because of salary reductions or alleged mistreatment, and those who remain have had to work extra shifts. The departures have left students struggling to enroll in courses or find thesis advisers, they say. On 13 October, Ecuador’s Higher Education Council (CES) ordered the university to file a “clear and accurate report” within 10 days answering complaints and inquiries from two professors and a group of students. They allege the university’s administration has violated professors’ rights and made long-term decisions with little transparency.

The …

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This is the scariest movie of all time, according to science: study

this is the scariest movie of all time, according to science: study

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Maybe you’re an avid horror movie lover that’s always looking for the next big scare; maybe you’re a casual viewer that sticks to terrifying films only around Halloween. Whichever side of the spectrum you may fall on, you can now add the movie that has been officially deemed the scariest film ever, according to science, to your queue.According to a study conducted by UK-based broadbandchoices, the “science of scare” can be tested via pouring through various critic’s lists and Reddit recommendations to come up with the top 50 shiver-inducing films. Said films were then watched by a panel of 50 people, all the while being hooked up to heart monitors to see which upped their blood pressure the most.So, which film ended up being the scariest of them all, scientifically-speaking? That crooked crown goes to “Sinister.”“Sinister” is a 2012 Blumhouse masterpiece that follows the story of true crime writer Ellison Oswalt (Ethan Hawke) who has the bright idea of moving his family to a home that was the scene of a grisly crime, all for the sake of inspiration (because that always works out well). He then discovers a box of film in the attic (it’ …

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KSAT Kids Home Science: Design a boat to float

ksat kids home science: design a boat to float

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SAN ANTONIO – Hello parents, teachers and students!Are you looking for something fun to do at home that has a little bit of science behind it?Check out KSAT 12 photojournalist Bill Caldera and his son William demonstrate an at-home science experiment that included building a float and determining how many pennies it will hold. It’s a fun opportunity to learn while using water.And be sure to check out GMSA@9 on Wednesdays when Meteorologist Kaiti Blake does science demonstrations and explains the reasoning behind it. Interested KSAT Kids can submit video of themselves doing an at-home science experiment by using the hashtag #ksatkids, and we will show off some of the submissions during the GMSA@9 newscast. Be sure to include your name and grade level with your submission. Design a boat to floatHere’s what you’ll need:Suggested Materials: aluminum foil, pennies or other small weighted objects, and a container or a sink filled with water.Questions to ask: What materials will you use? What design features work best? Which materials worked best in your design? Which improvements did you need to make? How many pennies was your boat able to hold without sinking?Procedure/Instructions:Create and …

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Magicians and science: The secret behind a popular trick

magicians and science: the secret behind a popular trick

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Magicians and science: The secret behind a popular trick Professor Maria with Mad Science joins FOX6 WakeUp to share the secret behind a popular trick. MILWAUKEE – Turns out you don’t have to be a magician to pull off fun feats. In fact, even magicians have a little science up their sleevees. Professor Maria with Mad Science joins FOX6 WakeUp to share the secret behind a popular trick. 

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Nasa Osiris-Rex spacecraft lands on asteroid Bennu in mission to collect dust

nasa osiris-rex spacecraft lands on asteroid bennu in mission to collect dust

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Asteroids

Spacecraft ‘kissed the surface’ in brief landing on asteroid 200m miles away from Earth in US-first mission

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1:08

Celebrations as Osiris-Rex spacecraft touches down on asteroid Bennu – video

A Nasa spacecraft has successfully landed on an asteroid, dodging boulders the size of buildings, in order to collect a handful of cosmic rubble for analysis back on Earth.
The space agency team behind the Osiris-Rex project said preliminary data showed the sample collection went as planned and that the spacecraft had lifted off the surface of asteroid Bennu.
“I can’t believe we actually pulled this off,” said lead scientist Dante Lauretta of the University of Arizona. “The spacecraft did everything it was supposed to do.”

NASA’s OSIRIS-REx
(@OSIRISREx)
The back-away burn is complete 🛑✅ I’m now moving to a safe distance away from Bennu. pic.twitter.com/bXk2ufSneS

October 20, 2020

Nasa administrator Jim Bridenstine offered his congratulations, saying: “We are on the way to returning the largest sample brought home from space since Apollo. If all goes well, this sample will be studied by scientists for generations to come.”
The Osiris-Rex spacecraft sent back confirmation of its brief contact with asteroid Bennu more than 200m miles (322m km) away, …

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The science and technology of sound sleep

the science and technology of sound sleep

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Pandemic worries have kept many of us awake this year. But David Rapoport ’70 has long known a thing or two about not getting a good night’s sleep. Rapoport is a leading expert in sleep medicine and the physiology of sleep-disordered breathing (sleep apnea and snoring). An estimated 10% to 15% of US adults have moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea, when soft tissues in the upper airways repeatedly collapse, blocking breathing; waking up is the only relief. The cause is unknown, but it can lead to excessive fatigue, neurocognitive impairment, and cardiovascular problems, among other issues. The most effective treatment is one co-developed by Rapoport: CPAP, short for “continuous positive airway pressure,” which delivers air pressure through a hose and mask to keep breathing passages open during sleep. After an Australian physician invented CPAP in 1980, Rapoport improved the circuitry and showed it worked for sleep apnea nearly 100% of the time. Yet patients who find CPAP cumbersome often opt for less effective treatments. Rapoport’s research now focuses on making the device more comfortable and effective, determining whom to treat, and improving patient training on how to wear it. “The balance between how well a therapy works and patients’ willingness to use …

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A Viral Theory Cited by Health Officials Draws Fire From Scientists

a viral theory cited by health officials draws fire from scientists

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As the coronavirus pandemic erupted this spring, two Stanford University professors — Dr. Jay Bhattacharya and Dr. Scott W. Atlas — bonded over a shared concern that lockdowns were creating economic and societal devastation.Now Dr. Atlas is President Trump’s pandemic adviser, a powerful voice inside the White House. And Dr. Bhattacharya is one of three authors of the so-called Great Barrington Declaration, a scientific treatise that calls for allowing the coronavirus to spread naturally in order to achieve herd immunity — the point at which enough people have been infected to stall transmission of the pathogen in the community.While Dr. Atlas and administration officials have denied advocating this approach, they have praised the ideas in the declaration. The message is aligned with Mr. Trump’s vocal opposition on the campaign trail to lockdowns, even as the country grapples with renewed surges of the virus.The central proposition — which, according to the declaration’s website, is supported by thousands of signatories who identify as science or health professionals — is that to contain the coronavirus, people “who are not vulnerable should immediately be allowed to resume life as normal” while those at high risk are protected from infection. Younger Americans should return …

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Strict biodiversity laws prevent Indian scientists from sharing new microbes with the world

strict biodiversity laws prevent indian scientists from sharing new microbes with the world

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Klebsiella indica, isolated from the surface of a tomato, is one of the few microbial species reported by Indian researchers this year.

National Centre for Cell Science

By Pratik PawarOct. 20, 2020 , 4:50 PM

Praveen Rahi spent the better part of the past 3 years identifying and describing a new species of a nitrogen-fixing bacteria he discovered on peas cultivated in the mountains of northern India. But it could take years for Rahi, a microbial ecologist at India’s National Centre for Cell Science (NCCS), to get the new species validated and officially named—if he doesn’t get scooped.

Syed Dastager, a microbiologist at the country’s National Chemical Laboratory, faces a similar problem. He says he has discovered 30 new microbial species over the past several years, but they all sit in his laboratory freezer, unknown to the world, because he can’t publish about them.

These scientists, like many others, are caught in a strange bureaucratic limbo between India’s stringent biodiversity protection laws and the rules of the International Committee on Systematics of Prokaryotes (ICSP), which validates newly discovered microbes. “As a country, we now face the prospect of losing the claim to document bacterial diversity from India,” Yogesh Shouche, a …

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