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DR. ROACH: Mystery stomach pain now blamed on abdominal migraine

dr. roach: mystery stomach pain now blamed on abdominal migraine

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Dr. Keith Roach Dear Dr. Roach: I am a 66-year-old white male who is very physically active. Until four years ago, the only real malady I suffered from was a benign enlarged prostate.In March 2016, I went to the emergency room for acute abdominal pain and cramping. It was relieved by intravenous pain medication. Since that initial episode, I have experienced the same symptoms approximately 12 more times. Since the onset of this excruciating pain, I have had two MRIs, an MRA, two CAT scans, a gallbladder test, two colonoscopies, one endoscopy and four hydrogen breath tests. I have been seen by two primary care physicians and two gastroenterologists and numerous emergency room physicians and physician assistants. No medical authority has been able to determine exactly why I have these episodes.I have been told that I may have Crohn’s disease and irritable bowel syndrome. The latest is abdominal migraine. I’m aware of the information on the first two conditions. Can you tell me anything about abdominal migraine and the likelihood that I may suffer from this? — R.H.Answer: I am sure you must be frustrated with the lack of diagnosis and continued symptoms. Abdominal migraine does indeed …

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‘The future of medicine’: Partnership to enhance Muncie as a leading medical hub in state

‘the future of medicine’: partnership to enhance muncie as a leading medical hub in state

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MUNCIE, Ind. — According to Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Delaware County has the fourth-highest number of primary care physicians per capita in the state, a ranking that should mean the county is one of the healthiest. But it’s not.Of Indiana’s 92 counties, Delaware County ranks 85th. So where’s the disconnect?Even with Indiana’s fourth-highest primary care physicians per capita, the county has just one primary care physician per 1,030 patients. In fact, the United States as a whole is facing a shortage in physicians. So in an effort to boost local physician training programs and retention, a number of healthcare entities in Muncie have partnered to form a long-term initiative, with funding from Ball Brothers Foundation, called Optimus Primary.“Optimus Primary is about taking all of the best pieces that we have in healthcare assets in Muncie and assembling them together in a way to improve the health outcomes of our community,” Derron Bishop, associate dean and director of Indiana University School of Medicine–Muncie, said in a release..Bishop is a founding member of Optimus Primary, which officially formed in 2016. He worked with Jud Fisher, president and chief operating officer of Ball Brothers Foundation, and Jeff Bird, …

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What’s the Difference Between N95 Masks and KN95 Masks?

what’s the difference between n95 masks and kn95 masks?

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Products featured are independently selected by our editorial team and we may earn a commission from purchases made from our links; the retailer may also receive certain auditable data for accounting purposes.

The rise in coronavirus cases across the country has led to a rise in companies making face masks too, as government officials continue to promote the wearing of face coverings as an effective way to prevent the spread of Covid-19. While there are a number of different options available, from lightweight face masks for running to more stylish picks, a new report says the most effective face masks are a protective N95 mask.
Also sometimes referred to as N95 respirators, these masks are not to be confused with KN95 masks, which have a similar name, but are held to entirely different standards. Here’s what you need to know.
N95 Masks vs. KN95 Masks: Similarities and Differences
Both N95 masks and KN95 masks are made from multiple layers of synthetic material (typically a polypropylene plastic polymer) and are designed to be worn over the mouth and nose. Straps behind your ear help to hold the mask in place. Both masks must filter out and capture 95% of tiny 0.3 micron …

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FAQ: How to care for your face mask (and why you shouldn’t hang it from your rear-view mirror)

faq: how to care for your face mask (and why you shouldn’t hang it from your rear-view mirror)

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But the increased dependence on the coverings has sparked countless questions. Chief among them: How do I take care of my mask so it continues to be as effective as possible?We interviewed three medical experts to get their recommendations for what the general public should and should not do when it comes to wearing masks and disinfecting them.“If you’re reusing a mask over and over again without caring for it in between, that becomes just as dirty as you touching something dirty and then putting it back on your face,” said Jade Flinn, a nurse educator for the Biocontainment Unit at Johns Hopkins Medicine.What are the general guidelines for proper mask care? For cloth masks, which have exploded in popularity in recent months, all three experts say daily washings are a must.“Treat your mask like your underwear,” Flinn said. “You want to change it every day.”She added: “Thinking about the moisture and the bacteria that’s building up in that mask itself, you don’t want to wear that mask again the next day.”In a perfect world and not our pandemic-stricken reality that has caused shortages of personal protective equipment, face coverings that …

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Culinary medicine: Experts explain how food can transform your life

culinary medicine: experts explain how food can transform your life

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Culinary medicine: Experts explain how food can transform your life

Ratziel San Juan (Philstar.com) – August 13, 2020 – 4:33pm

MANILA, Philippines — Medical experts say that taking the right food — as meals or medicine — can significantly impact both our physical and mental health.

During the Wednesday “Sekaya Prescribing Nature Series: Transforming your Life with Food” webinar, Dr. Oyie Balburias and Dr. John La Puma attested to the power of food in changing the course of our personal wellbeing.

Balburias, an Institute for Functional Medicine (IFM)-certified practitioner and pioneer of functional medicine in the Philippines, explained that our body works as a system and responds to what we intake.

“Being healthy means putting the right fuel in your body. Whole foods act as medicine that protect and heal, and give your immune system a break from toxins and additives found in processed food. Every meal you eat influences the way you feel, in one way or another, so the more nutritious food you choose, the closer you are to getting to optimum health,” he said.

Balburias said that the modern diet is nutrition-starved, long exposing us to illnesses apart from the ongoing novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.

“The problem is the …

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A doctor’s solution to creating deeper connections at work

a doctor’s solution to creating deeper connections at work

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At a time when many are working from home, juggling family commitments and dealing with the accompanying double threat of the coronavirus pandemic and economic disruption, nurturing strong positive connections at work has never been more important.
Workplace wellbeing is more than having access to discounted gym membership and good coffee. Studies from Harvard University, the University of Warwick, Gallup and the World Happiness Report 2020 have shown it is our relationships and social support, that contributes the most and essential to your health, mental wellbeing and performance.
The need for connections is deep in our evolutionary roots, said Dr Jenny Brockis, the best-selling author of Thriving Mind: How to Cultivate a Good Life.
Dr Jenny Brockis, a medical practitioner and board certified lifestyle medicine physician specialising in brain health, mental wellbeing and human connection.
“It’s a basic human need as important to our survival as air, food and water. Loneliness, the feeling of being disconnected or isolated from others is painful, triggering the same brain regions as if we have experienced physical hurt,” said Dr Jenny Brockis, a medical practitioner and board certified lifestyle medicine physician specialising in brain health, mental wellbeing and human connection.
“Conversely, when our relationships …

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Greenwich Hospital Shares October Program Calendar

greenwich hospital shares october program calendar

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Press release from Greenwich Hospital:Aug. 12, 2020Thursday, October 1 Education: Greenwich Hospital’s Richard Becker, diabetes educator, and Erica Christ, registered dietitian and diabetes educator, will present “Functional Exercise and Diabetes Control” from 2 – 3 pm via Zoom. Functional exercise training integrates strength, cardio and flexibility to create an efficient approach to physical activity that can have a positive impact on blood sugar control. To register, call 888-305-9253 or visit greenwichhospital.org/events. Free. Thursday, October 1, 8, 15, 22 Support: Greenwich Hospital’s Jennifer Denkin, PhD, psychologist, will facilitate the “Caregiver Stress Group” from 11 am – noon via Zoom. This group focuses on self-care and stress management for primary caregivers of individuals with chronic or terminal illness. Fee-based service. Most insurance accepted. Call 203-863-2939 for information and registration. Monday, October 5 Education: Greenwich Hospital’s Akli Zetchi, MD, cerebrovascular neurosurgeon, will discuss “Advances in Stroke Care” from 11 am – noon via Zoom. Learn about new diagnostic and treatment options that offer a better chance of recovery from strokes, including life-saving surgery known as mechanical thrombectomy. To register, call 888-305-9253 or visit greenwichhospital.org/events. Free. Wednesday, October 7 Education: Greenwich Hospital’s Veronica Bilenkin, consumer health librarian, will present “MedlinePlus: Free and Reliable Medical Information” from 4:30 – 5:30 pm …

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Lifestyle trends and tips for the 55+ community on living well and preparing for the future

lifestyle trends and tips for the 55+ community on living well and preparing for the future

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In the last few months, the COVID-19 pandemic has caused many people to take inventory of their lives — whether they’re making the most of their time on this earth and whether they’re prepared to leave it. In this panel discussion for Timeless in Texas, host Ron Corning talks with professionals in a wide range of fields — legal, finance, medicine and lifestyle — who want you to live long, enjoy life and ensure that you’ve got your affairs in order.[embedded content]Life changes fast, but you have to keep up. Here are four tips and trends that D-FW residents over 55 may want to consider.Tip: Have a will — but know that a will is not enough.Setting up a will requires two things that many people would rather avoid, says attorney Virginia Hammerle, founder of Hammerle Finley Law Firm in North Dallas: facing the fact that someday we are all going to die and spending money on the services of a lawyer. However, Hammerle says, everyone should have a will.“Everybody has an estate of some kind, even if it’s just a car and a small savings account. So it’s important that they at least get …

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HSC, Deterra launch campaign to deal with unused medications | Fort Worth Business Press

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The University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth is launching an educational campaign to prevent overdose deaths by teaching families how to properly dispose of unwanted or leftover prescription medications.Through a collaboration with Deterra pouches by Verde, HSC and several community partners will distribute 500 pouches, which destroy drugs when warm water is added to the bags containing deactivating pods, HSC said in a news release.Deterra pouches will also be provided to some patients receiving care through HSC’s Geriatric Clinic.Verde generously donated the pouches to HSC. Each bag can destroy up to 90 pills.The campaign is HSC’s second major opioid overdose death prevention project this year. In January, the university distributed 9,000 doses of the overdose-reversal drug Narcan and trained students, employees and community members to administer it.“The opioid crisis did not go away during COVID-19,” HSC President Dr. Michael Williams said. “In fact, hard economic times, isolation and stress can often exacerbate addiction problems. Now is not the time to relax in the fight against overdose deaths, and HSC will continue to lead this fight.”The HSC, Deterra program builds on existing drug disposal campaigns and resources promoted by the U.S. …

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