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Space.com is going to ‘Mars’ on a HI-SEAS habitat simulation

space.com is going to ‘mars’ on a hi-seas habitat simulation

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The HI-SEAS (Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation) habitat in Hawaii.  (Image credit: HI-SEAS)A group of six researchers will embark on a mission to “Mars” on Monday (Nov. 2). The Martian crew will include artists, scientists and … me!The crew will spend two-weeks traveling to a simulated Mars habitat. The mission, known as Sensoria M2, will take place at the HI-SEAS (Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation) habitat on the side of the volcano Mauna Loa. All crew members will have completed a two-week quarantine and COVID-19 tests prior to flying to the habitat to reduce risk as Sensoria M2 is taking place during the coronavirus pandemic. This mission will be part of the Sensoria program. Sensoria aims to support underrepresented groups in the space sector to “close existing gaps in our ability to support the next generation of crewed missions,” the program’s website states. Live updates: Our mission to ‘Mars’ at the HI-SEAS habitatMore: HI-SEAS’ 8-month mock Mars mission in pictures “All of our missions will be female-led and female-majority. We, of course, will welcome with open arms our male colleagues, but we believe that women need to be placed at the center of our shared vision for space …

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A mission to ‘Mars’ at the HI-SEAS habitat: Live updates

a mission to ‘mars’ at the hi-seas habitat: live updates

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2020-10-28T21:31:13.748Z
Space.com is going to Mars (Image credit: Space.com/Chelsea Gohd)It’s finally happening, I’m going to Mars! Well, not really, but I will joining a simulated Mars mission at the HI-SEAS habitat in Hawaii in November alongside astrobiologist and crew commander Michaela Musilova (who is also director of HI-SEAS), Air Force airman and chief engineering officer Amanda Knutson, veterinarian and chief medical officer Brandy Nunez,  science writer and crew science communication officer Beth Mund and artist and crew vice commander Richelle Gribble. The mission will be part of the Sensoria program, which aims to support underrepresented groups within the space sector. “All of our missions will be female-led and female-majority. We, of course, will welcome with open arms our male colleagues, but we believe that women need to be placed at the center of our shared vision for space exploration, that women need to be given a platform for professional development, opportunities for research and training,” bioengineer and Sensoria co-founder J.J. Hastings, who serves as the CEO of Analogs LLC, a company that backs the Sensoria program, told Space.com in January. 

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AI Weekly: In a chaotic year, AI is quietly accelerating the pace of space exploration

ai weekly: in a chaotic year, ai is quietly accelerating the pace of space exploration

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The year 2020 continues to be difficult here on Earth, where the pandemic is exploding again in regions of the world that were once successful in containing it. Germany reported a record number of cases this week alongside Poland and the Czech Republic, as the U.S. counted 500,000 new cases. It’s the backdrop to a tumultuous U.S. election, which experts fear will turn violent on election day. Meanwhile, Western and Southern states like Oregon, Washington, California, and Louisiana are reeling from historically destructive wildfires, severe droughts, and hurricanes.
Things are calmer in outer space, where scientists are applying AI to make exciting new finds. Processes that would’ve taken hours each day if performed by humans have been reduced to minutes, a testament to the good AI can achieve when used in a thoughtful way. While not necessarily groundbreaking, unprecedented, or state-of-the-art with regard to technique, the innovations are inspiring stories of discovery at a time when there isn’t a surfeit of hope.
Earlier this month, researchers at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California announced they’d fed an algorithm 6,830 images taken by the Context Camera on NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) to identify changes to …

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Letters to the Editor: Why fund space exploration when we have Super Fund sites off our coast?

letters to the editor: why fund space exploration when we have super fund sites off our coast?

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To the editor: Compliments to The Times for publishing reporter Rosanna Xia’s splendid article on DDT dumping and contamination in the channel between Los Angeles and Santa Catalina Island. Unfortunately, that dire situation will never be resolved. These issues couldn’t be resolved even in the much shallower Palos Verdes Shelf Superfund Site. A major lesson from the article is how little we know about marine ecosystems. As a nation, we spend many billions exploring heavenly bodies. Truthfully, we probably know proportionately more about the biology on Mars than we know about the complex ecosystems living in sediments half a mile offshore along our coast. In 2008, U.S. Geological Survey research indirectly suggested that major megafaunal assemblages that I quantified in 1974 living in nearshore sediments, including geoduck clams, have disappeared. However, funding to confirm these findings appears unavailable.
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Research priorities in this nation are haywire. We should be investigating the canaries on this planet first, then heavenly bodies.Dennis Lees, EncinitasThe writer is a marine biologist…
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To the editor: Where has all the money gone in the Superfund account to clean up the DDT off the Palos Verdes Peninsula? Instead of spending the money on research to …

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Space exploration: A man expelled by the United States helped China…

space exploration: a man expelled by the united states helped china…

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3 hours ago Image Released, Getty Images Comment on the image, Qian Shuisen Kavita Puri writes that Chinese scientist Qian Chuisen helped two superpowers reach the moon, but his role is only mentioned in one country. In Shanghai, there is a museum entirely dedicated to a single man containing 70,000 objects, the Qian Chuisen People’s World. A rare talent Qian is considered the godfather of the Chinese rocket and space program. His research helped develop the missiles that launched Chinas first satellite into space, and the missiles that became part of its nuclear arsenal. He is revered as a national hero. But in another great power, where he has studied and worked for more than a decade, his significant contributions are rarely mentioned at all. Qian was born in 1911, as the last imperial dynasty in China was on the verge of collapse to be replaced by the Chinese Republic. His parents were so educated that his father, after working in Japan, established the national education system in China. Qian was gifted from a remarkably young age. When he graduated from “Shanghai Jiao Tong” University and was the first in his class, he won a rare scholarship to join the Massachusetts Institute …

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Cell-Based Meat Maker Aleph Farms Launches Space Program To Grow Steaks On Mars

cell-based meat maker aleph farms launches space program to grow steaks on mars

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        3 Mins ReadIsraeli food tech Aleph Farms has recently announced the launch of its new program to produce its cultivated meat in outer space. Called “Aleph Zero”, the project will see the company collaborate with space agencies to bring local production of cultivated meat in remote extraterrestrial environments, from the Moon to Mars. Aleph Farms, the Rehovot-based company that grows slaughter-free steaks directly from non-GMO cells that have been isolated from animals, has revealed its brand new mission: to bring cultivated meat production to space. If the project succeeds, it will represent a major step forward in solving the challenge of food and resource scarcity on long-duration manned space explorations.To achieve its bold new goal, Aleph Farms says it is now securing strategic partnerships with tech companies and space agencies for long-term research and development contracts. It is hoped that future space programs will leverage Aleph Farm’s expertise in cell biology, tissue engineering, and food science to establish its production facility dubbed “BioFarm” in extraterrestrial environments. Read: 10 reasons why cultivated meat is the future of proteinCo-founded by Didier Toubia and Shulamit Levenberg along with the Israel food giant Strauss Group in 2017, Aleph Farms has since its inception raised a …

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The case for NASA’S Bridenstine post-Election Day

the case for nasa’s bridenstine post-election day

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No matter the outcome on Nov. 3, Administrator Jim Bridenstine should remain at the helm of NASA to shepherd the agency through one of the most dynamic times in its history. A return to American crewed launch capability, the Artemis Accords as a new U.S.-led international effort for developing the Moon, the fate of the International Space Station (ISS) as it celebrates a 20-year anniversary and the direction of key space science and technology programs are inextricably linked to the occupant of the NASA administrator’s office. The space industry continues to rapidly evolve, and NASA — a key enabler of such change — requires consistent leadership to sustain and grow American excellence. Bridenstine has not only demonstrated his ability to do this thus far, but his ability to persuasively make the case for America’s leadership role in space among the nations of the world befits his continued tenure as NASA administrator. ADVERTISEMENTAs a key component of America’s DIME (diplomatic, informational, military and economic) strategy to which Bridenstine often refers, NASA requires stable leadership in our current world of crisis. If a Biden administration comes into office on Inauguration Day, it should resist the urge to extend its replacement …

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I’m The Woman Who Helped Discover Water On The Moon

i’m the woman who helped discover water on the moon

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“The next hurrah moment was after the analysis was done. I think it was maybe five or six months ago that we were starting to get this information from the authors saying, “Hey, we think we have a definitive detection.” And that was probably their hurrah moment, where they were screaming with excitement saying, “Hey, we see a signal and it’s a strong signal!”

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The International Space Station and spaceship Earth share the same priorities, astronaut Nicole Stott says

the international space station and spaceship earth share the same priorities, astronaut nicole stott says

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Retired NASA astronaut Nicole Stott will share the similarities between space station engineering and Earth’s natural systems in an online panel discussion Friday (Oct. 30).Stott and several other space station astronauts will participate in the discussion as part of The Virtual Astronaut series, which highlights the contributions of astronauts to space exploration. The discussion on the 20th anniversary of permanent occupation of the International Space Station (ISS) will be moderated by collectSPACE founder and Space.com contributor Robert Pearlman. You can buy tickets here.Stott flew twice in space, during the three-month Expedition 20/21 in 2009 and the 12-day space shuttle mission STS-133 in 2011. As an engineer, Stott found it fascinating to see how space exploration “takes gravity out of the equation” for manufacturing and basic research in space, she told Space.com. (One commonly cited application of space research is the effect on human health, which simulates in part the aging process on Earth as bones weaken and muscles lose strength.)Related: Astronaut-artist Nicole Stott shares view from space in paintings  Astronaut Nicole Stott, Expedition 20 flight engineer, participates in the STS-128 mission’s first spacewalk of the STS-128 mission to the International Space Station on Sept. 1, 2009. (Image credit: NASA.)Space also served …

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The International Space Station and spaceship Earth share the same priorities, astronaut Nicole Stott says

the international space station and spaceship earth share the same priorities, astronaut nicole stott says

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Retired NASA astronaut Nicole Stott will share the similarities between space station engineering and Earth’s natural systems in an online panel discussion Friday (Oct. 30).Stott and several other space station astronauts will participate in the discussion as part of The Virtual Astronaut series, which highlights the contributions of astronauts to space exploration. The discussion on the 20th anniversary of permanent occupation of the International Space Station (ISS) will be moderated by collectSPACE founder and Space.com contributor Robert Pearlman. You can buy tickets here.Stott flew twice in space, during the three-month Expedition 20/21 in 2009 and the 12-day space shuttle mission STS-133 in 2011. As an engineer, Stott found it fascinating to see how space exploration “takes gravity out of the equation” for manufacturing and basic research in space, she told Space.com. (One commonly cited application of space research is the effect on human health, which simulates in part the aging process on Earth as bones weaken and muscles lose strength.)Related: Astronaut-artist Nicole Stott shares view from space in paintings  Astronaut Nicole Stott, Expedition 20 flight engineer, participates in the STS-128 mission’s first spacewalk of the STS-128 mission to the International Space Station on Sept. 1, 2009. (Image credit: NASA.)Space also served …

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