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Coronavirus | In Howrah, BJP to distribute homeopathic drug for immunity-building

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In West Bengal, where homeopathy enjoys a respectable status and where Assembly elections are due next year, the BJP in Howrah will distribute — for free — a homeopathic drug that supposedly helps ward off COVID-19 by boosting immunity.Also read: Howrah station turns into “hellhole” for hundreds of stranded passengersThe party has a considerable presence in Howrah — which lies across the River Hooghly from Kolkata — where saffron flags are a common sight and where some Hindu festivals whose celebrations are largely confined to north India are also observed with great fervour.On Saturday, a party worker went around the streets of Howrah in a battery-run rickshaw, announcing the free distribution of Arsenicum album 30 — the homeopathic drug — at the local party office on Sunday afternoon and evening.The man could be heard announcing repeatedly in Bengali: “The drug is being sold in the market for ₹100, ₹150, ₹200. In fact, now it is not even available in stores. But we BJP workers, who have been trying hard to fight the pandemic, are going to give it you for free so that people in the neighbourhood stay fit and healthy.”The man, however, cautioned that the drug was not meant to treat COVID-19 and should be …

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Coronavirus hopes and fears center on ‘immunity’

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Our ability to ward off infection by the new coronavirus is one of the hottest topics of scientific debate

Could exposure to the coronaviruses that cause the common cold help protect against COVID-19? Is herd immunity closer than previously thought?
As nations lift lockdowns and experts worry about a potential second peak in cases, our ability to ward off infection is one of the hottest topics of scientific debate.
Ever since it became apparent that children were less vulnerable to COVID-19 early in the pandemic, scientists have speculated that the regular spread of benign viruses in places like schools could have bolstered their immune response to the latest coronavirus.
Now the idea of “cross immunity” among the broader population is gaining some ground.
In a recent post on Twitter, Francois Balloux of University College London noted an “intriguing” lack of an immediate resurgence in COVID-19 cases following the easing of lockdowns in several countries.
Among the possible explanations, he noted, were seasonality and enduring social distancing practices.
But he posited a “wilder” hypothesis as well—that a “proportion of the population might have pre-existing immunity to #SARSCoV2, potentially due to prior exposure to ‘common cold’ coronaviruses”.
Balloux said that might …

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Coronavirus hopes and fears centre on ‘immunity’ – France 24

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Could exposure to the coronaviruses that cause the common cold help protect against COVID-19? Is herd immunity closer than previously thought?As nations lift lockdowns and experts worry about a potential second peak in cases, our ability to ward off infection is one of the hottest topics of scientific debate.Ever since it became apparent that children were less vulnerable to COVID-19 early in the pandemic, scientists have speculated that the regular spread of benign viruses in places like schools could have bolstered their immune response to the latest coronavirus.Now the idea of “cross immunity” among the broader population is gaining some ground.In a recent post on Twitter, Francois Balloux of University College London noted an “intriguing” lack of an immediate resurgence in COVID-19 cases following the easing of lockdowns in several countries.Among the possible explanations, he noted, were seasonality and enduring social distancing practices.But he posited a “wilder” hypothesis as well — that a “proportion of the population might have pre-existing immunity to #SARSCoV2, potentially due to prior exposure to ‘common cold’ coronaviruses”.Balloux said that might explain issues like cases where there is no transmission between spouses.Earlier this …

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Coronavirus hopes and fears centre on ‘immunity’

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Our ability to ward off infection by the new coronavirus is one of the hottest topics of scientific debate (AFP Photo/OZAN KOSE)MoreParis (AFP) – Could exposure to the coronaviruses that cause the common cold help protect against COVID-19? Is herd immunity closer than previously thought?As nations lift lockdowns and experts worry about a potential second peak in cases, our ability to ward off infection is one of the hottest topics of scientific debate.Ever since it became apparent that children were less vulnerable to COVID-19 early in the pandemic, scientists have speculated that the regular spread of benign viruses in places like schools could have bolstered their immune response to the latest coronavirus.Now the idea of “cross immunity” among the broader population is gaining some ground.In a recent post on Twitter, Francois Balloux of University College London noted an “intriguing” lack of an immediate resurgence in COVID-19 cases following the easing of lockdowns in several countries.Among the possible explanations, he noted, were seasonality and enduring social distancing practices.But he posited a “wilder” hypothesis as well — that a “proportion of the population might have pre-existing immunity to #SARSCoV2, potentially due to prior exposure …

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Texas Supreme Court: Lack of immunity to coronavirus alone isn’t enough for mail-in ballot

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The Texas Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that a lack of immunity to the new coronavirus does not qualify a voter to apply for a mail-in ballot.In the latest twist in the legal fight over voting by mail during the coronavirus pandemic, the court agreed with Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton that the risk of contracting the virus alonedoes not meet the state’s qualifications for voting by mail.“We agree with the State that a voter’s lack of immunity to COVID-19, without more, is not a ‘disability’ as defined by the Election Code,” the court wrote.Texas voters can qualify for mail-in ballots only if they are 65 years or older, have a disability or illness, will be out of the county during the election period, or are confined in jail. The Texas election code defines disability as a “sickness or physical condition” that prevents a voter from appearing in person without the risk of “injuring the voter’s health.”Although the court sided with Paxton’s interpretation of what constitutes a disability, it indicated that it is up to voters to assess their own health and determine if they meet the state’s definition.”We agree, of course, that a …

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Bioethicist: ‘Immunity Passports’ Could Do More Harm Than Good

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A woman’s blood is collected for testing of coronavirus antibodies at a drive-through testing site in Hempstead, N.Y., to determine whether she may have some immunity to the virus.

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“Immunity passports” have been proposed as one way to reboot economies in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. The theory is this: The approval of the so-called passports would rely on the positive results from an antibody test of your collected blood sample. If you have antibodies to the coronavirus after recovering from an infection, you might be immune from future infection and therefore could be authorized to work and circulate in society without posing a risk to yourself or others. At least, that’s the idea. But it “could create a lot more harm than it does good,” says Natalie Kofler, who teaches bioethics at Harvard Medical School. As she argues in a recent essay for the journal Nature, Kofler says a system that hinges on a blood test could cut off already marginalized populations from access to critical public resources, wherein “an immunoprivileged sort of status or an immunodeprived status” would dictate “where and what they …

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Immunity for negligent businesses during COVID crisis is a bad and dangerous idea | Commentary

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Multiple people died at a South Florida senior center that let workers infected with the coronavirus come in without screening – actions Gov. Ron DeSantis described as “clearly non-compliant, negligent and it did cost those residents their lives.” Now the nursing-home industry is seeking immunity from some lawsuits.(John McCall/South Florida Sun Sentinel)

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Coachella Valley far from COVID-19 herd immunity, preliminary antibody test results show

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About 20 Coachella Valley leaders and city staff were tested for coronavirus at the Riverside County Fairgrounds in Indio, Calif., on Wednesday, May 27, 2020. It’s part of a campaign to encourage the public to be tested.

Palm Springs Desert SunA preliminary analysis of coronavirus antibody tests suggests the Coachella Valley is far from developing herd immunity to COVID-19, says Desert AIDS Project infectious disease physicianChristopher Foltz, though additional data is needed to analyze for more accurate, broader trends.An antibody test determines if someone previously had the virus, which is different than the coronavirus swab tests that determine if someone is currently contagious with it. Most antibody tests, which require a pin-prick of blood, haven’t been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, so county health departments have not yet utilized them as part of their public health strategy.However, the Desert Healthcare District donated $350,000 to allow the three Federally Qualified Health Centers in the Coachella Valley to purchase 10,000 antibody tests to use among themselves, said Will Dean, Desert Healthcare District spokesman. Desert AIDS Project, Borrego Health and Clinicas de Salud del Pueblo are currently offering antibody tests at 10 locations throughout the valley.More: Riverside County advocates want …

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Engineering immunity: Profiling COVID-19 immune responses and developing a vaccine

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These diagrams of cell counts show how immune cell profiles differ between young mice and old mice. In particular, older mice have more cells that are implicated in runaway immune responses (neutrophils, orange), fewer “helper” and “killer” T-cells that can be trained to go after new threats (CD4 naive, purple; CD8 naive, pink), and fewer cells that clear away both viruses and inflammation (Alveolar macrophages (Mϕ) green). These trends carry over to humans, beginning to explain why older patients with respiratory viral infections such as influenza and COVID-19 are more likely to experience excessive and harmful inflammation. Credit: Wen group, University of Michigan

As COVID-19 looks more like a disease of the immune system, a Michigan engineer is working with doctors to look at how immune responses differ between mild and severe cases.
A chemical engineer who studies the immune system has set to work on COVID-19, working on a vaccine but also collaborating with doctors to understand the details of immune responses at the cellular level.
“What makes some groups more susceptible than others? If we can understand that, that could really help us design better vaccines and treatments,” said Fei Wen, the associate professor of chemical engineering who …

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Need an Immunity BOOST? Bring on the Broccoli Rabe! – Perishable News

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Salinas, CA:  Your body’s ability to
fight infection and disease depends on your immune system. The immune
system is made up of cells, tissues, and organs that work together to protect
your body from illness and infection.  D’Arrigo
California is launching a BOOST YOUR IMMUNITY
health campaign, stated Claudia Pizarro-Villalobos, Director of Marketing, “to
keep well-balanced and healthy we need to consume fresh fruits and vegetables as
they are packed with immune boosting vitamins and minerals.  Now more than ever, having an optimally
functioning immune system is critical to one’s health and wellness.”

A
healthy immune system paired with daily preventative measures that include
hand-washing, hand-sanitizing, and physical distancing is imperative for all
ages.  We have adapted to a new “normal” to
combat COVID-19 and studies have shown that a healthy diet and lifestyle can
boost the body’s natural defenses.  Pizarro-Villalobos
shared, “so, don’t wait, boost your immunity by consuming Andy Boy broccoli
rabe.  Broccoli
rabe is a nutrient-packed powerhouse veggie that will enhance your immune
system.”

Stacked Broccoli
Rabe Health Facts

High in
Vitamin A and Vitamin C to improve skin and cellular health Excellent
source of Vitamin K to fight against bone lossLoaded …

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