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New North Dakota higher ed policy seeks to protect student privacy | The Dickinson Press

new north dakota higher ed policy seeks to protect student privacy | the dickinson press

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The policy was originally created by the North Dakota Student Association and is the first of its kind in the nation to specifically address student data privacy, according to the North Dakota University System. Under the leadership of NDSA President Cambree Smith, a resolution on behalf of the students sought to outline their rights related to the collection and use of students’ personally identifiable information. It also will control access to that data. “The policy was supported by all of the appropriate councils and committees and passed with the support of the full board,” Vice Chancellor Lisa Johnson said. “I believe this reflects the board and the system’s support of our students’ needs to address concerns about protecting their privacy of data.” The policy states that students have the right to inspect and review the content of their educational record maintained at an institution. It also states students have a right to challenge the contents of those records.

Additionally, the policy says neither NDUS nor any NDUS institution can sell, release or disclose students’ personal identifiable information for commercial or advertisement purposes. The policy also covers third-party educational providers and students’ right to privacy with those types of groups. …

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Google filed a motion to dismiss a New Mexico lawsuit that says the company’s educational tools broke children’s privacy laws

Information Access and Management (IAM) Platform powers IAM Network - 60,000 + engaged information professionals worldwide.

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In February, New Mexico’s attorney general sued Google over allegations it is breaking privacy law by collecting personal data of children using its Google Education tools.

Google has filed a motion to dismiss, seen by Insider, arguing that it follows US. law in gaining parental consent when schools are using G Suite for Education tools.The lawsuit said Google Education tools are “spying” on families.New Mexico AG Hector Balderas accused Google of saving passwords, browser history.Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.Google has filed a motion to dismiss a lawsuit filed by New Mexico Attorney General Hector Balderas against the company in February, saying the company has broken federal and state laws by collecting personal data without parental consent through its G Suite for Education platform.In the motion to dismiss, filed late Thursday in the US District Court in Albuquerque, Google argued that it is following the law that protects children’s privacy in the US, the Child Online Privacy and Protection Act (COPPA) along with New Mexico’s Unfair Practices Act.It’s the latest face-off between Google and a state attorney general who has accused the company of misleading users and siphoning data illegally — at the same …

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Europe’s Leading Reputation Management and Privacy Protection Firm Expands to North America

europe’s leading reputation management and privacy protection firm expands to north america

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Personalized service offers free advice to US and Canadian individuals and businesses, leveraging over a decade of expertise in erasing malicious, erroneous, or unwanted information while enhancing positive reputations
BARCELONA, Spain, June 5, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Eliminalia, dedicated to the ‘right to be forgotten’, and enabling fresh starts for people and businesses, is expanding across the Atlantic to establish a foothold in North America with an initial presence in Los Angeles and Chicago. Established in Spain in 2012, Eliminalia has helped thousands of people and businesses erase their past and repair their reputations, whether caused by erroneous information, mistaken identity, or malicious intent.
“Increasingly strict privacy laws have empowered us to go beyond traditional online reputation management to deliver a holistic reputation service,” says Dídac Sánchez, founder and President of Eliminalia. “Now, we are taking those learnings and bringing them to America.”
Eliminalia serves a broad range of businesses and individuals, including celebrities who appreciate their dedication to complete privacy, thanks to a team of technicians who uncover all negative information wherever it resides – blogs, review sites, social media, even state registers. Once uncovered, Eliminalia uses propriety tools to remove unwanted information from the internet, even taking any necessary legal action required to …

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Fan Privacy Is In The Spotlight As Stadiums Tackle Virus Prevention

fan privacy is in the spotlight as stadiums tackle virus prevention

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The metal detectors every sports fan has become accustomed to at the gate might soon be accompanied by thermal body scanners as part of the gargantuan task of preventing the spread of the new coronavirus and other airborne diseases.And that might be just one thing the public will need to be comfortable with in order to bring games back for in-person viewing.Tickets have widely transitioned from paper souvenirs to smartphone screens, but how about using your face as your proof of purchase Nascent forms of crowd monitoring — like laser-driven density detection and camera-based calculations of line length — will likely grow faster in a post-pandemic era of live sports that must highlight hygiene.“The pandemic really ups the need for greater assurance of stadium safety,” said Bob Boland, an athletics official who teaches at Penn State and has more than two decades of experience in sports and law as an instructor, consultant and agent. “Vaccine treatments, containment, they all could be game-changers, but people will need to be comfortable with mass body temperature screening and other technology that could be in play.”Not unlike the aftermath from the 2001 terrorist attacks, when long waits to pass through magnetometers and have …

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Privacy VIOLATION: After Facebook, Google is now in a soup over user privacy

privacy violation: after facebook, google is now in a soup over user privacy

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At a time when privacy is sacrosanct to users, companies need to find new models to attract user information.Facebook, earlier this year, lost a $550 million class action suit for violating user privacy. The company had been using its facial recognition technology without user consent. These actions were against the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act. While one would believe that other tech majors would have learned from this, search-giant Google is now embroiled in a $5 billion lawsuit. The class action suit demands that Google pay $5,000 each to one million users for tracking their information in private browsing.Facebook had a direct liability in violating norms, Google may have some cushion. While the private browsing was meant so that it will be difficult to track a person, user policy indicated that Google shall still have access to certain data. Even if Google ends up winning this case, investigations will certainly reveal what all data Google was storing from private browsing.Related NewsAnd, if it was anything more than what Google had indicated, it would mean Google shelling out money. More important, the case comes at a time when companies are looking to invest in IoT products, which shall give them more …

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Bitcoin Privacy Wallet Wasabi Making Cops’ Jobs Harder: Europol Briefing – CoinDesk

bitcoin privacy wallet wasabi making cops’ jobs harder: europol briefing – coindesk

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Europol, the European Union’s law enforcement agency, has its eyes on the popular bitcoin privacy tool Wasabi Wallet, documents verified by CoinDesk show. 
Marked for “law enforcement only,” a two-part report by Europol’s European Cybercrime Centre (EC3) analyzed the privacy tool’s impact on using the Bitcoin blockchain to investigate crimes. 
“Things are not looking good” for law enforcement thanks to this relatively new software, the EC3 warned, citing data from leading blockchain analysis company Chainalysis estimating how much money is filtering through Wasabi for criminal purposes. 
“According to [Chainalysis], over the last three weeks, BTC in the amount of nearly 50 million USD were deposited into Wasabi with almost 30% coming from dark web markets,” says the first part of the report, circulated to law enforcement members in April. “This is a significant amount, relatively speaking, given the dark web transactions are estimated to have only 1% share of total transactions.”
Europol’s observations highlight a long-simmering tension between governments around the globe and Bitcoin privacy advocates. The blockchain is transparent, making it a useful tool for the former to thumb through accounts and transactions to track down criminals.
Privacy advocates, on the other hand, want to make bitcoin transactions …

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Employers must consider privacy protections as they roll out contact-tracing tools – MedCity News

employers must consider privacy protections as they roll out contact-tracing tools – medcity news

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Consulting giant PwC developed a contact-tracing app that would track if employees had been in close contact with each other while in the office, alerting them if they might have been exposed to Covid-19. While the company is testing the system internally, it plans to offer it to its clients.
Other companies are turning to screening tools, such as Microsoft and UnitedHealth Group, which are rolling out an app that would require employees to answer a series of questions about symptoms before they enter the office.
It might sounds a bit like a scene out of 1984, but the use of these tools is a reality as companies try to mitigate the spread of Covid-19 as workplaces reopen. Even in the midst of a pandemic, employers must be cautious not to encroach on personal health data that would be protected under privacy and employment laws, attorneys said.
For example, companies can require employees to participate in a temperature check when they come into work. But they can’t ask workers about their medical history or any underlying conditions while trying to determine who might be at a higher risk from Covid-19.
“While (temperature) checks are considered to be medical examinations, they …

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Protecting Your Privacy if Your Phone is Taken Away

protecting your privacy if your phone is taken away

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Your phone is your life. It’s where you communicate, get your news, take pictures and videos of your loved ones, relax and play games, and find a significant other. It can track your health, give you directions, remind you of events, and much more. It’s an incredibly helpful tool, but it can also be used against you by malicious actors. It’s important to know what your phone contains and how it can also make you vulnerable to attacks.Your threat model is unique and personal. And you will have to decide which solutions are the best for you. The best protection is to avoid creating the opportunity for an attacker to gain physical access to your phone or its metadata. The safest solution would be not to bring your phone to high-risk activities, such as protesting, but this might not be feasible for everyone.
What could someone without access to your phone know about you?
Without any physical access to your phone by an attacker, you might think your privacy is safe. However, your phone constantly communicates with cell towers to be able to transfer data (for your browsing or apps), or receive and send text messages …

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The 3 Things You Must Do to Protect Your Privacy While Protesting

the 3 things you must do to protect your privacy while protesting

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Now that the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) has the power to surveil protesters in the wake of the horrifying George Floyd killing, it’s vital to scrub your photos’ metadata. It’s equally important to turn off location services and blur fellow protesters’ faces.And, if possible, use a secure messaging app, like Signal. Over the last week, people in all 50 states in the U.S.—and well over a dozen cities across the globe—have protested against police brutality and systemic racism after George Floyd, a black man living in Minneapolis, was killed in police custody on May 25. But now that the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) has granted authority to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) to “conduct covert surveillance” on protesters, according to an alarming memo that BuzzFeed obtained, all participating protesters are at risk of being jailed or having police collect intel on them.

So to stay safe while protesting, you need to take a few steps to ensure your digital security: clear all of the metadata from your photos, blur the faces of your fellow protesters, and make sure to turn off location services on your phone. Here’s what you should do.How …

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