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Biden Pledges Ambitious Climate Action. Here’s What He Could Actually Do.

biden pledges ambitious climate action. here’s what he could actually do.

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WASHINGTON — Joseph R. Biden Jr.’s $2 trillion plan to fight global warming is the most ambitious climate policy proposed by a leading presidential candidate, a political lightning rod spotlighted on Thursday night when the Democratic nominee acknowledged during a debate that it would “transition” the country “from the oil industry.”But no one knows better than Mr. Biden, the former vice president, that it almost surely will not be enacted, even if his party secures the White House and the Senate. Thirty-six years in the Senate and the searing experience of watching the Obama administration’s less ambitious climate plan die a decade ago have taught him the art of the possible.Still, a President Biden could have real impact: solar panels and wind turbines spread across the country’s mountains and prairies, electric charging stations nearly as ubiquitous as gas stations and a gradual decrease in the nation’s planet-warming greenhouse pollution.“The oil industry pollutes significantly,” Mr. Biden said at the final presidential debate, adding, “it has to be replaced by renewable energy over time.”Mr. Biden’s advisers insist that climate change is not just a political slogan. And on Capitol Hill, his team is already strategizing …

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As Colorado wildfires burn, fears that climate change is causing “multi-level emergency” mount

as colorado wildfires burn, fears that climate change is causing “multi-level emergency” mount

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The record-breaking forest fires burning in Colorado even as winter sets in are the latest sign climate warming is hitting the West hard, causing scientists to up their rhetoric and warn it is past time to move beyond planning and start aggressively acting.“We’ve got to get motivated and stop turning the thermostat up. That is urgent, not a sci-fi thing. It is us turning up the thermostat. It does not readily turn down. The farther we turn it up, the worse it will get,” said Scott Denning, a Colorado State University atmospheric scientist.
Colorado and the West face more hot days and temperatures will shoot higher, scientists say. The rising heat is depleting water and drying soil across the Colorado River Basin and other river basins.  Last week, federal authorities classified 97% of Colorado in severe to exceptional drought.
Mega-fires including 2020’s Cameron Peak, East Troublesome and Pine Gulch are burning hotter and longer, with record destruction this year of 700,000 acres in Colorado and 6 million around the West. The smoke that exposed tens of millions of people to heavy particulates, health researchers say, will pose an even greater risk to public health in years to come.
“We’re choking …

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Electric vehicles fight climate change, save money | The Garden Island

electric vehicles fight climate change, save money | the garden island

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What do tailpipes and cigarettes have in common? More than you think….
The easy answer here is: Pollution that comes from burning fossil fuels, like from cars, trucks and fossil-fuel power generation, causes lung cancer, heart attacks, childhood asthma, dementia, psychosis, diabetes, childhood leukemia, brain tumors, learning challenges, renal failure, Alzheimer’s disease, fetal-development problems, higher bone fracture risk, lower sperm quality, etc.
Does that sound like some of the side effects from cigarettes? I mentioned that this is the easy part of the comparison. Now, here’s “The Rest of the Story.” Anyone remember that radio guy Paul Havey and his “The Rest of the Story” segments? He’d tell a semi-interesting story and then hit you with something you were not expecting. OK, most of us understand all the years and misinformation/lies from Big Tobacco, right!?! Furthermore, how over time the truth came out that cigarettes did cause lung cancer and a ton of other health issues.
Here’s the CRAZY part. Big Tobacco hired a few scientists: Frederick Seitz, Robert Jastrow and William Nierenberg, to testify to Congress and fabricate “junk-kine” science reports that there was no link to tobacco and cancer. Very well documented in …

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Opinion: Stop climate change with climate fiction?

opinion: stop climate change with climate fiction?

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In early June 2020, the Yakutia region of Siberia hit 100 degrees, causing the permafrost to melt and the dry soil beneath to burst into flames. Thick white smoke spread across the country’s green expanse, releasing more carbon emissions into the atmosphere than any other wildfire on Earth in the last two decades.

It is particularly worrisome that the Arctic is warming at least two and a half times faster than anywhere else on Earth, because melting Arctic sea ice leads to rising seas — and eventually to the flooding of coastal cities and villages. And yet, only 69 percent of Americans think global warming is happening. As for the rest of the world, a 2018 Pew poll reveals that a median of only 68 percent of those surveyed in 26 nations say that climate change is a threat.

Why do humans have such a hard time accepting the real and present danger of climate change? Much of the blame can be attributed to the fossil fuel industry, which engaged in an enormous public disinformation campaign for decades. But human psychology also reveals some answers. Many people believe that the planet is inherently just and stable. Climate change poses an uncomfortable challenge to that idea. Others …

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Joe Biden calls climate change the ‘number one issue facing humanity’

joe biden calls climate change the ‘number one issue facing humanity’

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Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden participates in the final presidential debate against U.S. President Donald Trump at Belmont University on October 22, 2020 in Nashville, Tennessee.Justin Sullivan | Getty ImagesJoe Biden declared climate change the “number one issue facing humanity” and vowed a national transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy that could create millions of new jobs.”It’s the number one issue facing humanity. And it’s the number one issue for me,” Biden said of climate change during an episode of Pod Save America released Saturday. He was interviewed by Dan Pfeiffer, a former senior advisor to President Barack Obama.”Climate change is the existential threat to humanity,” the former vice president said. “Unchecked, it is going to actually bake this planet. This is not hyperbole. It’s real. And we have a moral obligation.”Scientists have repeatedly warned that climate-change fueled disasters will continue to get worse and parts of the world will become unlivable as global temperatures rise and governments fail to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by reducing the burning of oil, gas and coal.Biden, the Democratic presidential nominee, has boasted a $2 trillion plan that invests significantly in clean energy in the transportation, electricity and building industry, cuts …

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Minority of Wisconsinites Say Climate Change is Having Negative Impact

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MADISON, WI (SPECTRUM NEWS) — A new Spectrum News/IPSOS Poll gauges how Wisconsinites see climate change’s role in the state.When asked how much of an impact, if any, climate change has played in various issues from flooding to air quality, the highest percentage of Wisconsinites routinely said they believed it had a negative impact, with the second largest chunk saying they believed it had no impact.
When asked about flooding in Western Wisconsin, 40% of Wisconsinites thought climate change had a major or minor negative impact. Twenty-five percent said it had no impact, while 25% said they did not know. Ten percent said it had a major or minor positive impact.

Daniel Wright, an assistant professor in civil and environmental engineering at the University of Wisconsin – Madison, said years with well-above average, or record-setting annual rainfall combined with an increase in intense storms have lead to more flooding around the state.
“We’ve really seen a major uptick in the number of extreme storms, both in the number and sort of the intensity of these extreme storms in the past couple of decades,” Wright said.
Wright said scientific evidence points towards climate change for the increase in precipitation. He says it’s tied …

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Letter to editor: Close loophole to address climate change

letter to editor: close loophole to address climate change

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Governor Tom Wolf embraced the role of climate action champion when he signed an executive order in January 2019 to reduce Pennsylvania’s greenhouse gas emissions by 25% by 2025 and 80% by 2050. Key to achieving these goals is cutting emissions of methane, a greenhouse gas over 80 times more potent than carbon in the near term and the cause of 25% of the man-made global warming we see today. Pennsylvania, as the second-largest natural gas producing state in the U.S., is a significant source of this pollution as natural gas is essentially methane.This is why Governor Wolf’s proposed rule to cut emissions of methane is critically important; it’s equally important to close a loophole in the rule that would exempt low-producing high-emitting wells (responsible for more than half of our oil and gas methane pollution). We should not address only half of the problem.Why should this concern residents of southeastern Pennsylvania, where there are no natural gas wells nearby? Because we all bear the burden of the climate impacts of this pollution. Absent real action, we will consign our children to an even worse fate.

Let us all call or write to Governor Wolf, asking him to truly be a …

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Seabird response to abrupt climate change 5,000 years ago transformed Falklands ecosystems

seabird response to abrupt climate change 5,000 years ago transformed falklands ecosystems

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The Falkland Islands are a South Atlantic refuge for some of the world’s most important seabird species, including five species of penguins, Great Shearwaters, and White-chinned Petrels. In recent years, their breeding grounds in the coastal tussac (Poa flabellata) grasslands have come under increasing pressure from sheep grazing and erosion. And unlike other regions of the globe, there has been no long-term monitoring of the responses of these burrowing and ground nesting seabirds to climate change.
A 14,000-year paleoecological reconstruction of the sub-Antarctic islands led by University of Maine researchers has found that seabird establishment occurred during a period of regional cooling 5,000 years ago. Their populations, in turn, shifted the Falkland Islands ecosystems through the deposit of high concentrations of guano that helped nourish tussac, produce peat and increase the incidence of fire.
This terrestrial-marine link is critical to the islands’ grasslands conservation efforts going forward, says Dulcinea Groff, who led the research as a UMaine Ph.D. student in ecology and environmental sciences, and part of a National Science Foundation-funded Interdisciplinary Graduate Education Research Traineeship (IGERT) in Adaptation to Abrupt Climate Change (A2C2). The connection of nutrients originating in the marine ecosystem that are transferred to the terrestrial …

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