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Scientists demonstrate a new experiment in the search for theorized ‘neutrinoless’ proc

scientists demonstrate a new experiment in the search for theorized ‘neutrinoless’ proc

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The CUPID-Mo detector is installed in the EDELWEISS cryostat at Modane Underground Laboratory (LSM) in France. Credit: CUPID-Mo collaboration

Nuclear physicists affiliated with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) played a leading role in analyzing data for a demonstration experiment that has achieved record precision for a specialized detector material.

The CUPID-Mo experiment is among a field of experiments that are using a variety of approaches to detect a theorized particle process, called neutrinoless double-beta decay, that could revise our understanding of ghostly particles called neutrinos, and of their role in the formation of the universe.
The preliminary results from the CUPID-Mo experiment, based on the Berkeley Lab-led analysis of data collected from March 2019 to April 2020, set a new world-leading limit for the neutrinoless double-beta decay process in an isotope of molybdenum known as Mo-100. Isotopes are forms of an element that carry a different number of uncharged particles called neutrons in their atomic nuclei.
The new result sets the limit on the neutrinoless double-beta decay half-life in Mo-100 at 1.4 times a trillion-trillion years (that’s 14 followed by 23 zeros), which is a 30% improvement in sensitivity over the Neutrino Ettore Majorana Observatory 3 (NEMO 3), a previous experiment …

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Brand Alchemy: A Conversation With Artist Of Science PayPal’s Rama Mallika

brand alchemy: a conversation with artist of science paypal’s rama mallika

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Data-led creativity has reached an inflection point. As a result, the era of art and commerce is giving way to a new age of art and science. We are amidst a data transformation revolution and the customer topography has never been more complex. Finding the right mix of algorithm and humanity is the Holy Grail or ultimate brand hack, no matter who you are, what you’re marketing, or who you are selling to.Consequently, a palpable need to formulate best-in-class “brand alchemy” is the new strategic imperative. This is the reason the past generation of “artists of business” I hailed in my book WE-Commerce, is quickly giving way to a new breed of executive that I am calling “artists of science”.

Brand Alchemy: A Conversation With Artist Of Science PayPal’s Rama Mallika

Billee Howard

I’ve launched the Brand Alchemy Q+A series in parallel with my Ask the CMO column to get into the minds of this new species of leadership, as I believe they will ultimately emerge as the creative Darwinists defining the future of both business and brand. I recently sat down with Rama Mallika, Senior Director of Market Research, Head of Customer Insights & Analytics …

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Science for You: When the ground sinks, arsenic levels in drinking water may rise

science for you: when the ground sinks, arsenic levels in drinking water may rise

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Water for our home in Bayside comes from our well as does the water of most homes on our street. As someone who drinks about a quart of well water a day, I was very interested in a recent article in Science magazine (https://science.sciencemag.org/content/368/6493/845) that reviews the distribution of arsenic in well water around the world. Fortunately for those of us who live in this beautiful area on the northwest coast of California, the levels of arsenic in our water are below the levels for safe water set by the World Health Organization. What does arsenic do to you and are there places in California and the rest of our planet that are affected by unhealthy levels of this chemical?To begin, what is arsenic? It is one of the basic chemical elements found in the periodic table that shows its relationship to other elements. Arsenic is dissolved from rocks by water in areas that have groundwater pools. If you have significant levels of arsenic in your water, it can cause cancer, heart disease, diarrhea and affect your skin.
The central valley of California is where people are being exposed to high levels of arsenic. This …

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Joseph Sabino Mistick: Medicine and science, not politicians, will keep us safe

joseph sabino mistick: medicine and science, not politicians, will keep us safe

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There must be a reckoning. For some public officials, it may be as soon as the next election, or it may come with the judgment of time and history. But sooner or later, those who have led us away from prevention and safety and toward calamity during the coronavirus pandemic will be called to account.
Some leaders are simply too weak to lead, unable to resist the understandable clamor of regular folks to get back to their everyday lives. Others make cold political decisions, like gamblers who bet with other people’s money, only this time they are betting with other people’s lives.
Call it misfeasance or malfeasance, failure born of incompetence or selfish intent. Either way, our private sense of right and wrong and our public sense of duty have both been violated. And, while this disease was sure to take some of us, respect for knowledge and science would save many of us.
But there is a shift. Public scorn for those who treated the coronavirus as a hoax is starting to come from every direction. Jennifer Rubin, …

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Anderson Center exhibit explores the intersection of art, science | RiverTowns

anderson center exhibit explores the intersection of art, science | rivertowns

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The exhibition, postponed from early spring, includes a spectrum of images ranging from artistic interpretations of nature to compositions generated by machine learning to blown glass pieces used for medical research. A public reception, redesigned to allow social distancing while people enjoy the event, will run 6-8 p.m. Friday, July 17, at Tower View. It’s free and open to everyone; light refreshments will be served. “Artistic work and scientific research share a starting place of curiosity and close observation,” Executive Director Stephanie Rogers pointed out.

The University of Minnesota Imaging Center helps researchers with images such as this plant leaf for their studies and publications. The image also is featured in “Art and Science” July 17-Aug. 8 at the Anderson Center in Red Wing. University of Minnesota Imaging Center photo

Rogers, who curated the exhibition, explained, “I grew up visiting my grandpa’s biology lab and classroom every summer, and was fascinated by the macro lenses and microscopes he used to study honeybees. “There is so much beauty in natural forms and scientific research. … I really wanted to do this show” after learning there are a number of artists in the region who work at “this intersection of art and …

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The science of smoking and COVID-19

the science of smoking and covid-19

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Presented by Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium At this point, everyone is familiar with the steps to take to guard against COVID-19: Wash your hands well with soap and water. Stay six feet from others outside your home. Cover your cough. Avoid touching your face. Here’s one that you don’t hear as much: Stop smoking. While some COVID-19 risk factors have to do with age, chronic illness or immunocompromisation, there’s one that’s tied directly to a different kind of medical concern — addiction to cigarettes. While smoking cigarettes doesn’t necessarily make you more likely to become infected with the novel coronavirus, smokers who do contract COVID-19 may be more likely to have serious or fatal cases than non-smokers. Why might COVID be harder on smokers? The answer lies in the lungs. COVID-19 and your breathing health “Not everyone is affected equally by COVID-19,” said Dr. Thomas Kelley, a pulmonologist at the Alaska Native Medical Center. While about 80 percent of patients experience mild to moderate symptoms, others develop a “devastating” lung infection, according to Kelley. These infections inflame the alveoli, fine sacs in the deepest portions of the lungs. This inflammation interferes with the body’s …

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Repurposing and science — the way to go with COVID-19

repurposing and science — the way to go with covid-19

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The good news is that if you get COVID-19, you stand a better chance of getting better sooner, without having a long, if any, stay in the ICU, and you may not have to suffer on a ventilator.The bad news is there may be no silver bullet of a vaccine by the end of the year, and if one is approved, there may be a free-for-all among vaccine developers, countries and special interests.
For the improvement in treatment outlook, thank a process called exaptation. The term has been appropriated from evolutionary biology and means essentially work with what you have, adapt and deploy. The most quoted example is how birds developed wings for warmth and found they could be used for flying.
One of the great exponents of exaptation, Omar Hatamleh, chief innovation officer, engineering, at NASA, says: “There is an abundance of intellectual property that can be repurposed or used in areas and functions outside of their original intended application.”
There are hundreds of thousands, maybe millions, of medicines — generally referred to as “compounds” in the pharmaceutical world — that have been developed for specific purposes but which may be useful in some other disease, “off label” in the …

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Science World rallies power of young Dr. Bonnie Henry as it faces a $13M loss due to COVID-19 | CBC News

science world rallies power of young dr. bonnie henry as it faces a $13m loss due to covid-19 | cbc news

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A school photo of Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry, whose leadership in B.C. has inspired murals, pins, and even a pair of shoes, is featured as part of a campaign titled The World Needs More Nerds.

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