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Between the Rows: Researchers examine climate change perception among specialty-crop producers

between the rows: researchers examine climate change perception among specialty-crop producers

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UNIVERSITY PARK — Farmers whose operations have been impacted negatively by changing precipitation patterns — either too much or not enough water — are more likely to acknowledge the link between extreme weather conditions and climate change. That is one of the findings of a study examining farmers’ perceptions of resource availability and climate change, published recently in Organization and the Environment.“Agriculture has increasingly been affected by weather disruptions linked to climate change over the past four decades,” said Leland Glenna, professor of rural sociology and science, technology, and society in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences.

“Droughts, flooding, changing temperatures and crop losses due to insects and disease are more prevalent than ever before. Despite the threat, many producers do not acknowledge that climate change is occurring, or that it is caused by humans.”That presents a challenge, he pointed out, because acknowledging that human behavior, climate change and increasingly extreme weather are interconnected is key to climate adaptation and mitigation efforts.“If agricultural producers perceive climate change and resource problems — water availability in this case — differently, it is important to explain the underlying socioeconomic factors and market structures that lead to this divergence,” Glenna said.He and Yetkin Borlu, …

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Rate of climate change in deep waters of the ocean could be to be seven times faster by 2050 even if we reduce emissions- Technology News, Firstpost

rate of climate change in deep waters of the ocean could be to be seven times faster by 2050 even if we reduce emissions- technology news, firstpost

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The results also showed that no amount of carbon emission reduction can reverse the rate of change that has already taken place.

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Shareholders urge Chevron, Exxon to report climate change health risks

shareholders urge chevron, exxon to report climate change health risks

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Shareholders pushed Chevron Corp. and Exxon Mobil Corp. on Wednesday to report on climate change-related public health risks of petrochemical operations and welcomed an announcement by Southern Co. that it has set a goal of net-zero carbon emissions by 2050.The actions happened at the companies’ respective annual meetings Wednesday. According to preliminary results, 46% of investors voted to support a shareholder resolution at Chevron and 25% voted to support a similar one at Exxon. Filed by shareholder advocacy group As You Sow, the resolutions call for Exxon and Chevron to report on the public health risks of expanding their petrochemical operations in areas increasingly prone to climate change-induced storms, flooding, and sea level rise. The same proposal received a majority 54.7% vote at Phillips 66 earlier this month.As You Sow President Danielle Fugere said efforts to have the companies report on future plans to reduce their carbon footprint have been challenged by Exxon and Chevron, which “continue to give lip service to the goals of the Paris Agreement, while failing to clarify for investors if or how they will reduce their emissions in alignment with the Paris Agreement’s critical 1.5 degree Celsius goal,” Ms. Fugere said in a statement.Shareholders at Southern Co.’s …

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Green alert: How indigenous have been experiencing climate change in the Amazon

green alert: how indigenous have been experiencing climate change in the amazon

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Late rainfall, intense drought, dry riverbeds, more forest fires, less food available — indigenous communities across the Brazilian Amazon suffer social transformations due to climate change.Indigenous people believe that climate change has even affected their physical health: previously controlled diseases like measles and yellow fever, they say, have inexplicably reappeared in the rainforest, and even indigenous women’s menstrual cycles are beginning at an earlier age.Indigenous people have found many ways to take action and lessen the harm. These approaches include selecting and growing seeds that are more resistant to drought and heat, investing in frontline firefighters and even a smartphone app that offers information about climatic variations. Antônio Veríssimo Apinajé recalls his life as a boy in Taquari village in northern Tocantins state, Brazil, in the 1970s. “It would rain without stopping for three or four days in a row, from January to June. The rivers and springs would fill up. The rainy season would begin in October, when my family would plant manioc, corn and rice. In June, the dry season would come, which lasted until September.”
But not anymore, says the leader of the Apinajé indigenous people. “There are years in which the rains take …

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Climate Change Burns Its Way Up the Pop Charts

climate change burns its way up the pop charts

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Welcome to the Climate Fwd: newsletter. The New York Times climate team emails readers once a week with stories and insights about climate change. Sign up here to get it in your inbox. Image By This year, I came up with the idea to analyze the frequency of climate change references in American popular music. Culture can be a bellwether, both signaling where we are heading and, occasionally, helping to steer society’s course. And while, anecdotally, it seemed that climate change has been appearing more frequently in music, I wanted to put numbers to it.I looked at lyrics from a set of songs that the lyric hub Genius identified as containing climate change themes (based on search terms I had provided). And I compared the artists on that list with the Billboard charts, selecting only those who had appeared on domestic charts in the past two decades.I counted at least 192 references to climate change, 26 of which appeared just last year. For an article, I pared that down to 10 influential songs and spoke with some of the artists.[If you’re already signed up for the Climate Fwd: newsletter, good move. Why not follow the New York Times …

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Researchers examine climate change perception among specialty-crop producers

researchers examine climate change perception among specialty-crop producers

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Credit: CC0 Public Domain

Farmers whose operations have been impacted negatively by changing precipitation patterns—either too much or not enough water—are more likely to acknowledge the link between extreme weather conditions and climate change.

That is one of the findings of a study examining farmers’ perceptions of resource availability and climate change, published recently in Organization and the Environment.
“Agriculture has increasingly been affected by weather disruptions linked to climate change over the past four decades,” said Leland Glenna, professor of rural sociology and science, technology, and society in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences.
“Droughts, flooding, changing temperatures and crop losses due to insects and disease are more prevalent than ever before. Despite the threat, many producers do not acknowledge that climate change is occurring, or that it is caused by humans.”
That presents a challenge, he pointed out, because acknowledging that human behavior, climate change and increasingly extreme weather are interconnected is key to climate adaptation and mitigation efforts.
“If agricultural producers perceive climate change and resource problems—water availability in this case—differently, it is important to explain the underlying socioeconomic factors and market structures that lead to this divergence,” Glenna said.
He and Yetkin …

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Asteroid, climate change not responsible for mass extinction 215 million years ago

asteroid, climate change not responsible for mass extinction 215 million years ago

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URI graduate student Reilly Hayes (left) and undergraduate Amanda Bednarick examine an outcrop for fossils at Petrified Forest National Park as part of their research. Credit: Amanda Bednarick

A team of University of Rhode Island scientists and statisticians conducted a sophisticated quantitative analysis of a mass extinction that occurred 215 million years ago and found that the cause of the extinction was not an asteroid or climate change, as had previously been believed. Instead, the scientists concluded that the extinction did not occur suddenly or simultaneously, suggesting that the disappearance of a wide variety of species was not linked to any single catastrophic event.

Their research, based on paleontological field work carried out in sediments 227 to 205 million years old in Petrified Forest National Park, Arizona, was published in April in the journal Geology.
According to David Fastovsky, the URI professor of geosciences whose graduate student, Reilly Hayes, led the study, the global extinction of ancient Late Triassic vertebrates—the disappearance of which scientists call the Adamanian/Revueltian turnover—had never previously been reconstructed satisfactorily. Some researchers believed the extinction was triggered by the Manicouagan Impact, an asteroid impact that occurred in Quebec 215.5 million years ago, leaving a distinctive 750-square-mile lake. Others …

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At last, a climate policy platform that can unite the left

at last, a climate policy platform that can unite the left

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After the ignominious failure of the Democratic climate change bill in President Barack Obama’s first term — the Waxman-Markey cap-and-trade bill that narrowly passed the House but never came to a vote in the Senate — what little unity there was on climate change within the Democratic coalition fractured. Everyone went their own way, furious at everyone else.
Democratic members of the House were angry at Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who was angry at the climate movement, which was angry at the big mainstream green groups, which were angry at Obama, who was reduced to addressing climate change through regulations that President Donald Trump wound up repealing.
In all, the decade of climate politics from 2008 to 2018 netted frustratingly little progress at the federal level or consensus about the path ahead. No one was happy, and no one agreed on what to do next. Robinson Meyer captured it well in a 2017 piece in the Atlantic: “Democrats Are Shockingly Unprepared to Fight Climate Change.”
But something different has been happening lately, as groups across the left come together to hash out their differences on climate policy. It turns out they agree on quite a bit. In fact, for the first time in memory, there’ …

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Don’t Drop This Ball—How Sports Organizations Tackle Climate Change

don’t drop this ball—how sports organizations tackle climate change

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Dalila Jakupović was preparing to serve when she doubled over in a coughing fit. She tried to stand, but eventually, she crumpled to her knees. The Slovenian tennis player was winning her first-round match at this year’s Australian Open when she could no longer breathe. As she withdrew, she wiped tears from her eyes with a towel her opponent offered. “It was really scary,” she said the next day. “I didn’t know what to do. I had the feeling like I’m gonna collapse on the court… The whole match was tough for me to breathe, to get some fresh air, to get some air at all.”
Jakupović has no history of asthma or breathing issues, but the bushfires that ravaged much of Australia in late 2019 and into early 2020 created unhealthy conditions for even the healthiest among us. The air quality in Melbourne the day Jakupović was forced to withdraw was in the “very poor” to “hazardous” range, with a noticeable thick cloud of smoke hanging in the air. And this wasn’t the first time someone struggled at the Australian Open for reasons unrelated to the backhand accuracy of the person on the other side of the …

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