Advertisement

A strategic approach to COVID-19 vaccine R&D

Information Access and Management (IAM) Platform powers IAM Network - 60,000 + engaged information professionals worldwide.

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

ILLUSTRATION: DAVIDE BONAZZI/SALZMANARTThere is an unprecedented need to manufacture and distribute enough safe and effective vaccine to immunize an extraordinarily large number of individuals in order to protect the entire global community from the continued threat of morbidity and mortality from severe acute respiratory syndrome–coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The global need for vaccine and the wide geographic diversity of the pandemic require more than one effective vaccine approach. Collaboration will be essential among biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies, many of which are bringing forward a variety of vaccine approaches (1). The full development pathway for an effective vaccine for SARS-CoV-2 will require that industry, government, and academia collaborate in unprecedented ways, each adding their individual strengths. We discuss one such collaborative program that has recently emerged: the ACTIV (Accelerating COVID-19 Therapeutic Interventions and Vaccines) public-private partnership. Spearheaded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), this effort brings together the strengths of all sectors at this time of global urgency. We further discuss a collaborative platform for conducting harmonized, randomized controlled vaccine efficacy trials. This mechanism aims to generate essential safety and efficacy data for several candidate vaccines in parallel, so as to accelerate the licensure and distribution of multiple vaccine …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE

Groups Work Together to Increase HPV Vaccinations | SweetwaterNOW

Information Access and Management (IAM) Platform powers IAM Network - 60,000 + engaged information professionals worldwide.

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

ROCK SPRINGS — Through a combination of vaccination, screening, and treatment of pre-cancers, there is the possibility to eliminate vaccine-preventable human papillomavirus (HPV) cancers.Memorial Hospital of Sweetwater County’s Sweetwater Regional Cancer Center, the American Cancer Society, and statewide partners; Wyoming Cancer Resource Services, and the Wyoming Department of Health Immunization Unit, have teamed up to increase HPV vaccination rates.HPV vaccination works best when given between the ages 9 and 12. Children and young adults age 13 through 26 who have not been vaccinated, or who haven’t received all their doses, should get the vaccine as soon as possible. An estimated eight out of 10 people will get HPV during their lives. There is no treatment for HPV infection, but vaccination and screening can prevent most HPV-related cancers.Advertisement – Story continues below…“We are always promoting cancer prevention and awareness,” said Tasha Harris, Sweetwater Regional Cancer Center director. “I think that there are some misconceptions about the HPV vaccine, but the HPV vaccine has been proven to prevent cancer and protect our kids. I am grateful for our partnership with the American Cancer Society and their tireless efforts to help prevent cancer.”Robyn Owens, charge nurse at Family & Occupational Medicine Clinic of …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “Groups Work Together to Increase HPV Vaccinations | SweetwaterNOW”

Bulgaria pins hopes on TB vaccine against coronavirus

Information Access and Management (IAM) Platform powers IAM Network - 60,000 + engaged information professionals worldwide.

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

Credit: CC0 Public Domain

In the worldwide battle against COVID-19, scientists are investigating whether a century-old tuberculosis vaccine might offer some additional protection against the novel coronavirus.
And Bulgaria—one of the world’s leading manufacturers of the vaccine—is holding out hope of new markets for the many millions of doses it produces each year.
Bacillus Calmette-Guerin, or BCG, was developed by two French researchers, Albert Calmette and Camille Guerin, in 1921 as a vaccine against tuberculosis, a lung disease that, according to the World Health Organization, is the world’s top infectious killer and the cause of 1.5 million deaths globally every year.
In the fevered search for a treatment against COVID-19, clinical trials are under way—in Australia, South Africa, Europe and the United States—to examine a hypothesis that BCG might provide a complementary shield against the novel coronavirus.
The WHO, for its part, said last month that there is no evidence that BCG protects people against infection with COVID-19.
Nevertheless, Bulgarian scientists suggest that the Balkan country’s high rate of BCG vaccination—as well as an early lockdown—helped it to escape the worst of the pandemic.
“BCG generates a powerful immune stimulation. And while we are waiting for …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “Bulgaria pins hopes on TB vaccine against coronavirus”

Child Vaccination Rate Drops Sharply, Worrying Pediatricians of Public Health Consequences | FlaglerLive

Information Access and Management (IAM) Platform powers IAM Network - 60,000 + engaged information professionals worldwide.

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

The number of vaccinations administered to children during the Covid-19 pandemic has sharply decreased, leading to worries among pediatricians about public-health consequences if something isn’t done to reverse the trend

Florida Department of Health data show a 15 percent reduction in the number of vaccinations administered in March 2020 compared to March 2019 — and a whopping 40 percent reduction in vaccinations administered in April 2020 compared to the previous year. The drop coincided with Gov. Ron DeSantis’ decision to issue a statewide stay-at-home order to help prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus, the cause Covid-19.
The numbers are especially concerning for a county like Flagler, where child immunization was already among the lowest in the state, well before the pandemic struck. Last year, Flagler had the second-highest rate of children not immunized against measles and other communicable diseases, according to the Flagler Health Department. Immunization rates were just under 92 percent for children who’d enrolled in kindergarten. A small portion of those not immunized had a medical exemption, which is generally temporary. A larger portion had a religious exemption, which tends to be permanent.
“We are really emphasizing the need for kids to come in for their well visits and certainly to get …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “Child Vaccination Rate Drops Sharply, Worrying Pediatricians of Public Health Consequences | FlaglerLive”

AstraZeneca locks up COVID-19 vaccine supply with Oxford BioMedica production deal

Information Access and Management (IAM) Platform powers IAM Network - 60,000 + engaged information professionals worldwide.

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

AstraZeneca is on the hook for millions of doses of the University of Oxford’s front-runner COVID-19 vaccine candidate, assuming it proves effective. To fill those orders, the British drugmaker has agreed to a short-term manufacturing deal that will help it bridge the gap.AstraZeneca and Oxford BioMedica inked a one-year deal covering “multiple batches” of the University of Oxford’s adenovirus-based COVID-19 vaccine candidate, AZD1222, as part of a consortium aimed at speeding production of the shot.
As part of the agreement, AstraZeneca will have access to Oxford BioMedica’s 84,000-square-foot OxBox commercial manufacturing center in Oxford, England. The agreement will turn out most of the clinical and commercial supply in 2020 with the possibility of expansion in the future, Oxford BioMedica said in a release.

Cambrex Webinar

Understanding the Importance of Crystallization Processes to Avoid Unnecessary Cost, Risk and Development Delays

Wednesday, May 27, 2020 | 10am ET / 7am PTA well-developed crystallization process can produce suitable particles that can facilitate consistent filtration, drying and formulation of the API and allow confident and reliable manufacturing of the final drug product, while avoiding unnecessary cost, risk and development delays.

So far, it’s a small-scale tie-up for AstraZeneca, which agreed in April to handle commercialization and manufacturing of …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “AstraZeneca locks up COVID-19 vaccine supply with Oxford BioMedica production deal”

Big gene therapy names line up behind experimental Covid-19 vaccine

Information Access and Management (IAM) Platform powers IAM Network - 60,000 + engaged information professionals worldwide.

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

An early stage vaccine against Covid-19 based on the same basic technology used in gene therapy is gaining some support from some of that field’s biggest names.
Earlier this year, James Wilson, a gene therapy pioneer, got a call from Luk Vandenberghe, who had been a graduate student in Wilson’s lab two decades ago. Vandenberghe wondered if a virus they had worked on as a potential component of gene therapies might work as part of a vaccine against SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes Covid-19.
“It’s a great idea,” said Wilson, who heads the Gene Therapy Program at the University of Pennsylvania. “What can I do to help?”
advertisement

Vandenberghe, director of the Grousbeck Gene Therapy Center at Massachusetts Eye and Ear, is taking Wilson up on his offer. On Thursday, the Grousbeck center announced a collaboration with Penn to conduct necessary animal tests of the new gene therapy, called AAVCOVID. At the same time, AveXis, the gene therapy unit of the drug giant Novartis, has signed up to manufacture supplies of the experimental vaccine for human clinical trials at no cost. The studies are expected to begin in the second half of this year.

There is a …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “Big gene therapy names line up behind experimental Covid-19 vaccine”

Coronavirus may never go away, even with a vaccine

Information Access and Management (IAM) Platform powers IAM Network - 60,000 + engaged information professionals worldwide.

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

It is a daunting proposition — a coronavirus-tinged world without a foreseeable end. But experts in epidemiology, disaster planning and vaccine development say embracing that reality is crucial to the next phase of America’s pandemic response. The long-term nature of covid-19, they say, should serve as a call to arms for the public, a road map for the trillions of dollars Congress is spending and a fixed navigational point for the nation’s current, chaotic state-by-state patchwork strategy.With so much else uncertain, the persistence of the novel virus is one of the few things we can count on about the future. That doesn’t mean the situation will always be as dire. There are already four endemic coronaviruses that circulate continuously, causing the common cold. And many experts think this virus will become the fifth — its effects growing milder as immunity spreads and our bodies adapt to it over time.For now, though, most people have not been infected and remain susceptible. And the highly transmissible disease has surged in recent weeks, even in countries that initially succeeded in suppressing it. Left alone, experts say, it will simply keep burning through the world’s population.“This virus is here …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “Coronavirus may never go away, even with a vaccine”

Proponents of bill ending Connecticut’s religious exemption to vaccines eye special session for vote

Information Access and Management (IAM) Platform powers IAM Network - 60,000 + engaged information professionals worldwide.

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

People opposed to a repeal of Connecticut’s religious exemption to vaccinations protested outside the state Capitol in February.Legislative leaders, who initially intended to avoid controversial bills during a special session this summer, are now poised to tackle one of the most divisive issues: A measure that would remove Connecticut’s religious exemption from mandatory vaccinations.
Democratic leaders in both chambers said the COVID-19 crisis has made an already-pressing problem even more urgent – the declining rate of children being vaccinated because they are claiming a non-medical exemption. That has spurred them to push for a swifter vote on the measure.
The most recent version of the bill would permit all children who are currently enrolled in school and claiming a religious exemption to continue doing so, but would bar new children entering day care or the school system from claiming the exemption.
I believe in the bill now as much as I did then and, one could argue, even more so.”
— Rep. Jonathan Steinberg, co-chair of the Public Health Committee
While children already enrolled in school would be ‘grandfathered’ in, some lawmakers believe even this group should not be allowed to abstain from getting a COVID-19 vaccination on religious …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “Proponents of bill ending Connecticut’s religious exemption to vaccines eye special session for vote”

Low vaccination rates and ‘measles parties’ fueled 2019 measles outbreak in NYC

Information Access and Management (IAM) Platform powers IAM Network - 60,000 + engaged information professionals worldwide.

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

An electron micrograph of the measles virus. Credit: CDC/ Courtesy of Cynthia S. Goldsmith

An analysis of the 2018-2019 measles outbreak in New York City—the largest such outbreak in the United States in nearly three decades—identifies factors that made the outbreak so severe: delayed vaccination of young children combined with increased contact among this age group, likely through “measles parties” designed to purposely infect children. The study by Wan Yang, Ph.D., assistant professor of epidemiology at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, has implications for the future, as vaccination rates plummet during the COVID-19 pandemic.
The findings are published in the journal Science Advances.
“Measles Parties” Accelerated Measles Spread
Yang, an infectious disease modeler who previously published analyses on the spread of influenza and COVID-19, designed a computer model to simulate the transmission of measles in an Orthodox Jewish community in New York City from October 2018 to July 2019 based on city data of measles cases. Around a quarter of young children aged 1 to 4 were estimated to be susceptible to measles at the onset of the outbreak, likely due to delayed vaccination. However, the high number of infections would have been very unlikely without the increased contact …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “Low vaccination rates and ‘measles parties’ fueled 2019 measles outbreak in NYC”