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Durham Museum of Life and Science reopening Tuesday

durham museum of life and science reopening tuesday

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DURHAM, N.C. (WTVD) — Durham’s Museum of Life and Science is reopening this week.Members will be able to visit the museum starting on Tuesday as part of its phased opening. Most of the museum’s indoor activities will be closed.There will be ample outdoor activities and exhibits open with guests required to wear face masks. The museum’s website says the Dinosaur Trail, Train, Farmyard, Sailboats, Sprout Café, and Explore the Wild exhibits will be open. All visitors will have to reserve tickets online before visiting.The museum will be open to members Tuesday through Sunday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. More information is available on the museum’s website. Copyright © 2020 WTVD-TV. All Rights Reserved.

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Scientists urge WHO to address airborne spread of coronavirus

scientists urge who to address airborne spread of coronavirus

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Until recently, most public health guidelines have focused on social distancing measures, regular hand-washing and precautions to avoid droplets. But the signatories to the paper say the potential of the virus to spread via airborne transmission has not been fully appreciated even by public health institutions such as the WHO.The fact that scientists resorted to a paper to pressure the WHO is unusual, analysts said, and is likely to renew questions about the WHO’s messaging.“WHO’s credibility is being undermined through a steady drip-drip of confusing messages, including asymptomatic spread, the use of masks, and now airborne transmission,” said Lawrence Gostin, a professor of global health law at Georgetown University who provides technical assistance to the organization.He praised the WHO for hosting regular briefings and acknowledged that the organization is in a tough spot because it “has to make recommendations for the entire world and it feels it needs irrefutable scientific proof before coming to a conclusion.”But he warned that “the public, and even scientists, will lose full confidence in WHO without clearer technical guidance.”A spokesperson for the organization said it is aware of media reports about the issue and will have technical experts …

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How Science Drove McLaren To Its Best F1 Season-Opener Since 2014

how science drove mclaren to its best f1 season-opener since 2014

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Lando Norris steers his McLaren to third place giving the team its best start to an F1 season since … [+] 2014 (Darko Bandic / POOL / AFP) (Photo by DARKO BANDIC/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)

POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Additional reporting by Caroline Reid
Paying salaries is usually the biggest single cost for companies in any industry. Not Formula One teams. The amount they spend on research and development often overtakes their employee costs and is the formula for their success.
After an extended break due to the coronavirus F1 returned to the track on Sunday with a nailbiter in Austria which saw reigning champion Lewis Hamilton finish fourth after being penalized when his Mercedes collided with Alex Albon’s Red Bull Racing car.
Mercedes still finished on top as Hamilton’s team mate Valtteri Bottas won the race. He was joined on the podium by Ferrari’s Charles Leclerc and Lando Norris, a 20 year-old racing prodigy who joined the McLaren team last year. It wasn’t just his best result but McLaren’s best start to an F1 season since 2014.

It was a race of attrition as only 11 of the 20 cars finished. This is where McLaren’s investment in research and development came into its own.
A …

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New Grand Teton science chief followed unconventional path

new grand teton science chief followed unconventional path

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In this undated photo, Gus Smith arrived in Jackson, Wyo., in Jan. 2020, from Minnesota’s Superior National Forest, and is now working as Grand Teton National Park’s chief of science and resource management. He replaced Sue Consolo-Murphy, who retired. (Ryan Dorgan/Jackson Hole News & Guide via AP)/In this undated photo, Gus Smith arrived in Jackson, Wyo., in Jan. 2020, from Minnesota’s Superior National Forest, and is now working as Grand Teton National Park’s chief of science and resource management. He replaced Sue Consolo-Murphy, who retired. (Ryan Dorgan/Jackson Hole News & Guide via AP)/JACKSON, Wyo. (AP) — Gus Smith was walking his German shorthair not far from his Moose home one Saturday in late May when euphoria flew by in a flock.Fellow birders would best appreciate his experience.Out on foot near the Chapel of Transfiguration, Smith suddenly found himself engulfed by black rosy finches. That’s an alpine species of songbird that’s normally found only above treeline, yet there he was, at below 6,500 feet, surrounded by perhaps 300 to 350 of them.“They’re just doing that cloud thing,” Smith recounts. “They were right there — they go right through us.”Even retelling the tale, he was exuberant, the Jackson Hole News & …

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At Tortilleria Zepeda, tortillas are an art — and a science

at tortilleria zepeda, tortillas are an art — and a science

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Before moving to Madison in 2016, Julian Zepeda was a marine biologist who spent his days with turtles in his hometown of Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. But when he and wife Heidi prepared to start a new life near her Spring Green home, she told the animal lover he might need to consider new interests. “Cows are probably your best bet,” she told him. Four years later, Julian has channeled his love of science in a very different direction: making tortillas.It began as a problem-solving endeavor. Julian had tried one Madison Mexican restaurant after another and found them all disappointing. The dishes were fine, he said, but the tortillas just weren’t up to par. Ditto for the tortillas he found at the grocery store, which were full of preservatives. “You can smell the chemicals,” he said. 








Owners of local business Tortilleria Zepeda, Julian and Heidi Zepeda, dine on tacos, made with their tortillas, at Canteen in Madison, on Wednesday, June 24.

RUTHIE HAUGE

These were nothing like the tortillas he’d grown up eating in Puerto …

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GUEST COLUMN: Follow the science

guest column: follow the science

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Our Neighbors: Brenham students participate in science festival

our neighbors: brenham students participate in science festival

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Twelve Brenham Junior High School students and one Brenham High School student participated in the Austin Energy Regional Science Festival in Austin on Feb. 20. Four students — Emily Crawley, Cullen Halfmann, Madison Moran and Joshua Parker — advanced to the Texas Science and Engineering Festival.Addison Schramme won the Superintendent’s Award and finished in fifth place in the earth and environmental science category; Abbey Cross finished in first place in the biomedical and health science category; Halfmann won first place in materials; Parker won third place in materials; Moran won third place in microbiology; and Crawley finished in third place in the plant science senior division.

Pictured from left, back row: Kaylan Curl, Laci Strack, Madison Moran, Addison Schramme, Kaylee Sodolak, Alex Dallmeyer and Caden O’Hearn; front row: Emily Crawley, Sarah Mabie, Abbey Cross, Joshua Parker, Cullen Halfmann and Ty Crampton.



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Bring the fireworks indoors with this ‘Fireworks in a Jar’ science experiment!

bring the fireworks indoors with this ‘fireworks in a jar’ science experiment!

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MOBILE, Ala. (WKRG) — June 20, 2020 at 4:43 PM is the official start of summer, or the summer solstice.
What causes seasons? So we all know that the sun orbits the Earth, and the Earth rotates on its own axis. The Earth is also tilted on its axis at 23.5 degrees. This tilt is what causes our seasons. During the summer solstice, the Earth has its maximum tilt towards the sun, making this day have the longest amount of sunlight in the Northern Hemisphere (shortest in the Southern Hemisphere). Mobile will receive 14 hours 8 minutes and 6 seconds of sunlight where Pensacola will receive 14 hours 6 minutes and 45 seconds of daylight.

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Science with Strus: Magic milk fireworks

science with strus: magic milk fireworks

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FORT WAYNE, Ind. (WANE) – This week Joe has a fun experiment that will allow the young ones to get in on the fourth of July fireworks celebration in a fun, super safe way!

For this experiment you’ll need milk, food coloring, dish soap, and cotton swabs.

Pour some milk onto a plate or a dish, just make sure it has sides so that the milk does not spill. You don’t need a lot for this experiment.

Add some drops of both blue and red food coloring into the milk. Make sure they are spaced a part and isolated from the other drops.

Now, place some dish soap on the tip of a cotton swab. Touch the swab to the middle of the milk surface and watch what happens. It will be like fireworks on the plate!

The science behind this experiment is all in the chemical reaction between the dish soap and the milk. Dish soap quickly moves to the fat molecules in milk. When placing the cotton swab onto the plate, the quick movement of the dish soap to the milk results in a rapid stretching of the food coloring. This creates a “firework” in the bowl!

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See Science Fly

see science fly

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The best things about paper airplanes are that they allow you to be creative and that paper is easily accessible. You can use any type of paper — like this newspaper. That allows you to try lots of things and see what happens — opening the door to creativity and seeing science fly.Newspaper is most likely the most produced paper product on Earth, but few paper airplanes are made of it. You are about to change that. Together we are combining the world’s most popular paper with the world’s most common paper airplane — the Dart. Follow the folding directions and make a great paper airplane.There are a few secrets to making a paper airplane that flies well. People tend to focus on the folding pattern and the throw. These two things are important, but what is often overlooked are the fine-tuning adjustments. Adjustment 1: Bend the back edge of the wing up a little bit; this prevents nose dives. Just pinch the back edge between your fingertips and bend upward to create a small flap. The amount varies plane to plane; you have to watch its flight and bend up more if your plane dives and reduce the amount …

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