Advertisement

COVID-19: As Chinese authorities expand use of health tracking apps, privacy concerns grow

covid-19: as chinese authorities expand use of health tracking apps, privacy concerns grow

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

SHANGHAI: China’s health tracking QR codes, which have played a key part in the country’s successful containment of the coronavirus, now look set to play a much broader role in daily life as local authorities dream up new uses for the technology.Embedded in the popular WeChat and Alipay smartphone apps, the codes use self-reported and automatically collected travel and medical data to give people a red, yellow or green rating indicating the likelihood of having the virus.

Advertisement

Advertisement

To walk around freely, people in China must have a green rating and since February they have been asked to present their health QR codes to gain entry into restaurants, parks and other venues.READ: Green or red light: China COVID-19 app is ticket to everywhereREAD: China’s coronavirus campaign offers glimpse into surveillance systemThe codes had so far met with little public resistance, seen as a necessary tool to get the economy back up on its feet again.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Or that was the case until the eastern city of Hangzhou proposed on Friday permanently assigning each of its residents a coloured health badge and giving them a score from 0-100 based on their medical records and lifestyle habits.Images …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE

China deliberates privacy law in the midst of increased state surveillance

china deliberates privacy law in the midst of increased state surveillance

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

China’s parliament has said it will legislate on privacy protection, while the state has vastly increased surveillance since the outbreak of COVID-19.
The National People’s Congress, China’s highest legislature, is back in session after being delayed by two months by COVID-19. In his work report, the Chairman of the People’s Congress’s Standing Committee singled out three pieces of legislation related to state security and society control as priority tasks in the immediate future. Privacy protection is one of them, the other two being laws on data security and biosecurity, according to the reporting by People’s Daily, one of China’s main propaganda outlets.
This does not come as a complete surprise. At the end of last year, the People’s Congress announced at a press conference that a comprehensive privacy law would go through the legislation process in 2020. So far China’s privacy protection legislation is dispersed in different criminal, civil, and commercial laws and it often replies on the interpretation of judges when it comes to specific litigations. This gives those organisations, businesses, and individuals that have almost unbridled access to personal and private data an almost free hand to determine how to …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “China deliberates privacy law in the midst of increased state surveillance”

French privacy watchdog okays coronavirus tracing app

french privacy watchdog okays coronavirus tracing app

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

Credit: CC0 Public Domain

France’s privacy watchdog gave the green light Tuesday to a government-backed cellphone app that will alert users if they have been in contact with an infected person.

Use of the app called StopCovid will be voluntary, and will keep track of users who had been in close proximity of one another over a two-week period. If any become infected, they inform the platform, which alerts the others.
Privacy defenders have expressed fears that the app marks the first step towards a society under constant online surveillance.
But the CNIL watchdog, which gave provisional approval for StopCovid in April, said Tuesday that the app met the legal requirements for privacy protection, with ample safeguards to prevent abuse.
It nevertheless made a number of recommendations to make it even safer, including improving the quality of information provided to users, allowing users to object to information shared, and providing an option for erasing stored data.
The app will not rely on geolocation, but instead use Bluetooth technology which allows mobile phones to communicate with each other over short distances.
The French parliament, which must vote on the rolling out of the app, will debate the matter on Wednesday.
If …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “French privacy watchdog okays coronavirus tracing app”

As Chinese authorities expand use of health tracking apps, privacy concerns grow

Information Access and Management (IAM) Platform powers IAM Network - 60,000 + engaged information professionals worldwide.

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

SHANGHAI (Reuters) – China’s health tracking QR codes, which have played a key part in the country’s successful containment of the coronavirus, now look set to play a much broader role in daily life as local authorities dream up new uses for the technology. A security guard holds up a QR code for a health app at a checkpoint to the 798 art district in Beijing following the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, China April 29, 2020. REUTERS/Thomas PeterEmbedded in the popular WeChat and Alipay smartphone apps, the codes use self-reported and automatically collected travel and medical data to give people a red, yellow or green rating indicating the likelihood of having the virus. To walk around freely, people in China must have a green rating and since February they have been asked to present their health QR codes to gain entry into restaurants, parks and other venues. The codes had so far met with little public resistance, seen as a necessary tool to get the economy back up on its feet again. Or that was the case until the eastern city of Hangzhou proposed on Friday permanently assigning each of its residents a coloured health badge and giving them …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “As Chinese authorities expand use of health tracking apps, privacy concerns grow”

China’s Virus Apps May Outlast the Outbreak, Stirring Privacy Fears

china’s virus apps may outlast the outbreak, stirring privacy fears

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

At the height of China’s coronavirus outbreak, officials made quick use of the fancy tracking devices in everybody’s pockets — their smartphones — to identify and isolate people who might be spreading the illness.Months later, China’s official statistics suggest that the worst of the epidemic has passed there, but the government’s monitoring apps are hardly fading into obsolescence. Instead, they are tiptoeing toward becoming a permanent fixture of everyday life, one with potential to be used in troubling and invasive ways.While the technology has doubtless helped many workers and employers get back to their lives, it has also prompted concern in China, where people are increasingly protective of their digital privacy. Companies and government agencies in China have a mixed record on keeping personal information safe from hacks and leaks. The authorities have also taken an expansive view of using high-tech surveillance tools in the name of public well-being.The government’s virus-tracking software has been collecting information, including location data, on people in hundreds of cities across China. But the authorities have set few limits on how that data can be used. And now, officials in some places are loading their apps with new features, …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “China’s Virus Apps May Outlast the Outbreak, Stirring Privacy Fears”

China to set individual privacy rights in its first civil code

china to set individual privacy rights in its first civil code

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

China is poised to enshrine individuals’ rights to privacy and personal data for the first time, a symbolic first step as more of the country of 1.4 billion people becomes digitised – and more vulnerable to leaks and hacks.

Photo: AFP

The legislation is part of China’s first civil code, a sweeping package of laws being deliberated during the annual meeting of parliament, which began on Friday after a delay of more than two months due to the coronavirus.
According to a recent draft, an individual has a right to privacy and to have their personal information protected.
Data collectors have a duty to protect an individual’s personal information and cannot obtain, disclose or conduct transactions of such data without consent.
The push to shore up data privacy in China is widely seen as an effort to protect and legitimize the country’s fast-growing internet sector and place safeguards on the movement of valuable Chinese data overseas.
The legislation will need to be followed by detailed regulation spelling out how those rights will be protected, and this gives no protection from increasingly pervasive surveillance by a government that wields total control over the country’s digital sphere.
Nevertheless, lawyers and legal experts say …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “China to set individual privacy rights in its first civil code”

Data Privacy Spending: Latest Research – MSSP Alert

data privacy spending: latest research – mssp alert

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

by DH Kass • May 25, 2020
Nearly 100 percent of organizations will increase their spend on data privacy in the next 12 months, a new survey of large, U.S.-based companies found.
FTI Consulting, a Washington, D.C.-based global management advisor has produced a study, Future-Proofing Corporate Data Privacy: Budgeting and Solutions to Address Tomorrow’s Compliance Challenges, to address solutions, strategies and budgets companies have in mind to tackle emerging data privacy challenges over the next 12 months. An earlier report in the two-part series examined corporate data privacy. (see below)
Top line result: Organizations intend to significantly increase their spending on data privacy-related programs. Nearly 90 percent of the 500 respondents in the study are willing to risk not fully complying with privacy regulations to mine the value of their data.

Key findings include:

97 percent of organizations will increase their spend on data privacy in the coming year, with nearly one-third indicating plans to increase budgets by at least 90 percent.
78 percent agreed with the statement: “The value of data is encouraging organizations to find ways to avoid complying fully with data privacy regulation.”
87 percent of respondents believe that steps toward compliance will mitigate regulatory scrutiny.
44 percent said they expect lack of awareness and …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “Data Privacy Spending: Latest Research – MSSP Alert”

Q&A: Do children have a right to privacy? Pediatric psychologist weighs in

Information Access and Management (IAM) Platform powers IAM Network - 60,000 + engaged information professionals worldwide.

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:




MANSFIELD — As children get older, they often want to explore the world around them on their own, but how much exploration should a parent give to a child? Parker Huston, PhD, a pediatric psychologist at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, weighed in on the matter, sharing his insight both professionally and as a parent himself. RICHLAND SOURCE: Are children just as entitled to privacy as adults are? HUSTON: Ah, that’s a loaded question to start off. I mean, what I would say is that the right to privacy depends on the age and developmental level. And parents have a responsibility to raise independent, self-reliant, critical thinking, problem solving children. So some kids pick that up at an earlier age and they probably should be given more independence and privacy, whereas other kids haven’t earned that right. In other words, I don’t think that there’s a children’s Bill of Rights that includes social media privacy or the ability to lock their door at a certain age—that every kid no matter what they’ve done leading up to that point can just point to this rule that says, ‘You must leave me alone now.’RICHLAND SOURCE: Speaking …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “Q&A: Do children have a right to privacy? Pediatric psychologist weighs in”