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True, the social networking app that promises to ‘protect your privacy,’ exposed private messages and user locations

true, the social networking app that promises to ‘protect your privacy,’ exposed private messages and user locations

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True bills itself as the social networking app that will “protect your privacy.” But a security lapse left one of its servers exposed — and spilling private user data to the internet for anyone to find.
The app was launched in 2017 by Hello Mobile, a little-known virtual cell carrier that piggybacks off T-Mobile’s network. True’s website says it has raised $14 million in seed funding, and claimed more than half a million users shortly after its launch.
But a dashboard for one of the app’s databases was exposed to the internet without a password, allowing anyone to read, browse and search the database — including private user data.
Mossab Hussein, chief security officer at Dubai-based cybersecurity firm SpiderSilk, found the exposed dashboard and provided details to TechCrunch. Data provided by BinaryEdge, a search engine for exposed databases and devices, showed the dashboard was exposed since at least early September.

More on Extra Crunch

After we reached out, True pulled the dashboard offline.
Bret Cox, chief executive at True, confirmed the security lapse but did not answer our specific questions, including if the company planned to inform users of the security lapse or if it planned to disclose the incident to …

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Mother of slain boys expresses thanks, asks for privacy

mother of slain boys expresses thanks, asks for privacy

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LEAVENWORTH, Kan. (AP) — A Kansas mother whose estranged husband is charged with killing the couple’s two sons before fleeing with their two daughters is thanking the people who helped track down the girls nearly 400 miles away in Oklahoma.

Tara Jackson’s attorney, Gary Nelson, also described the deaths of 14-year-old Logan Jackson and 12-year-old Austin Jackson as “traumatic” in a statement released Wednesday. He asked for privacy “during the next very few hard few weeks and months that Tara and her family have ahead of them.”

Leavenworth father facing capital murder charge related to killing of his 2 sons

The Leavenworth County Sheriff’s Office said she went to the home of Donny Ray Jackson Jr., 40, on Saturday with the children’s paternal grandmother after one of the siblings didn’t show up for a soccer game. They found one of the boys dead, and law enforcement then discovered the other body.

The boys’ younger sisters, 3-year-old Aven Jackson and 7-year-old Nora Jackson, were found unharmed near Erick, Oklahoma, after a massive search. And their father was charged Tuesday with capital murder and two alternative counts of first-degree murder.

Nelson said there are “a lot of unanswered questions” regarding what …

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French advertisers file complaint over Apple’s iOS 14 privacy plan | AppleInsider

french advertisers file complaint over apple’s ios 14 privacy plan | appleinsider

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A collection of advertisers and publishers in France have filed a complaint with the country’s competition authority, claiming that iOS 14’s blocking of automatic ad tracking will severely affect revenues. Following months of complaints, a coalition of French advertisers and publishers have taken their case to France’s French Autorite de la Concurrence (ADLC). The coalition includes Interactive Advertising Bureau France, Mobile Marketing Association France, Syndicat des Regies Internet, and Union Des Entreprises de Conseil et Achat Media. They reportedly hope France will force Apple to further delay the changes, which had originally been set for September 2020. Apple now intends to introduce the feature in 2021. When it’s in place, all iPhone users will be specifically asked permission before any ad is allowed to track them. The companies in the French consortium have previously pointed out that because of European regulations over GDPR data protection, iOS 14 users are effectively going to be asked twice, every time. According to the Wall Street Journal, the coalition argues that this creates a barrier that will mean most users choosing to refuse ad tracking. ”At the highest level, this is a novel case — a truly important case— because it deals with the use of privacy as …

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Apple’s new privacy measures draw antitrust complaint in France

apple’s new privacy measures draw antitrust complaint in france

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Source: Joseph Keller / iMore
A new report says a group of publishers and advertisers in France has filed a complaint against Apple over claims that its new privacy measures, which will make it harder to track users, are anticompetitive.
According to The Wall Street Journal

Advertising companies and publishers have filed a complaint against Apple Inc. with France’s competition authority, arguing that privacy changes the smartphone maker plans to roll out are anticompetitive.
Starting in early 2021, Apple’s operating software will require apps to get opt-in permission from users to collect their advertising identifier, a key number used to deliver targeted ads and check how ad campaigns performed.

The complaint has been filed by a group of trade associations, which claim that “few users will agree to be tracked”, making it much harder for advertising companies to sell personalized ads. Whilst companies like Facebook have previously kicked up a stink about the move, WSJ notes this is the first formal legal challenge to the measure on antitrust grounds. From the report:

“At the highest level, this is a novel case—a truly important case—because it deals with the use of privacy as a sort of fig leaf for anticompetitive conduct,” …

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WSJ News Exclusive | Apple Faces Antitrust Complaint in France Over Privacy Changes in iPhones

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Advertising companies and publishers have filed a complaint against Apple Inc. with France’s competition authority, arguing that privacy changes the smartphone maker plans to roll out are anticompetitive. Starting in early 2021, Apple’s operating software will require apps to get opt-in permission from users to collect their advertising identifier, a key number used to deliver targeted ads and check how ad campaigns performed. The…

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Column: Michigan can bring privacy into the 21st century

column: michigan can bring privacy into the 21st century

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Nearly every American owns a cell phone that can track their every movement and store sensitive information. But this convenience doesn’t mean Michiganders give up their expectation of privacy. On Nov. 3, voters have a chance to ensure that our right to privacy in digital matters is respected by law enforcement when they vote on Proposal 2.This ballot proposal would require law enforcement to acquire a search warrant before accessing a person’s electronic data and communications. This may seem like a commonsense protection of privacy. But, currently, law enforcement is able to access Michiganders’ data — essentially at will.This issue has been a big deal in Michigan for the better part of a decade. In 2011, as a result of suspected criminal activity in Detroit, the FBI acquired  several months’ worth of Timothy Carpenter’s cellphone location records without a warrant. These records revealed over 13,000 locations Carpenter had visited, yet the FBI didn’t even have to ask a judge to get that information.

Fortunately, the American Civil Liberties Union took on Carpenter’s case, which went all the way to the United States Supreme Court. In 2018, the court held that Fourth Amendment protections apply to cellphone location records and …

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Protect your privacy rights by voting yes on California’s Prop. 24

protect your privacy rights by voting yes on california’s prop. 24

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When the landmark California Consumer Privacy Act was signed into law in 2018, consumers in California were promised new privacy rights. The CCPA is the only U.S.-based online privacy law that gives consumers the right to access, delete and stop the sale of their information. These key rights are particularly important because the federal government hasn’t approved a national privacy law.

But the promise of the CCPA has yet to be realized. Google, Facebook and other companies have unilaterally declared that consumers can’t opt out of their data being harvested on other websites. This has left Californians struggling to exercise their privacy rights under the new law. Despite the efforts of key political leaders in Sacramento, the Legislature has failed to fix loopholes and strengthen the act.

A new initiative, Propisition 24, would help address significant problems with the law’s implementation and enforcement, and we urge consumers to vote “yes.” These proposed reforms would close some of the worst loopholes that companies have exploited to deny consumers’ opt-out requests, better ensuring that consumers can exercise their privacy rights.

Prop. 24 ensures that:

• Consumers can opt out of behavioral advertising. Under Prop. 24, once you opt out, big tech companies …

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Apparently “privacy” means something different to politicians

apparently “privacy” means something different to politicians

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The Washington Post found out how politicians get everyone’s information.

MEMPHIS, Tenn — In tonight’s Ransom Note: politics and privacy. 

If you’re like me, the campaign messages are coming in all directions in these final days: text messages phone calls, email, snail mail, Facebook feed and Twitter feeds. 

So the Washington Post decided to ask, how are the politicians finding us? 

The conclusion was a little unnerving. 

“Their files treat your contact details like a matter of public record and can be more intimate that credit applications, including your income, debt, family, ethnicity, religion, gym habits, whether you own a gun and what kind of car you drive.” 

In other words, the Post found that privacy may be a cornerstone of American Liberty, but politicians on both sides have no problem invading it. 

Perspective | How politicians target you: 3,000 data points on every voter, including your phone number https://t.co/FwEmcx6qg0— The Washington Post (@washingtonpost) October 27, 2020

Get this, the Republican National Committee proudly told reporters it now has 3-thousand data points on every single voter. 

Democrats have also admitted to acquiring enough to “understand you as a person, including unique identifiers from your phone that can be used …

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Here’s How 2020 Created A Tipping Point In Trust And Digital Privacy

here’s how 2020 created a tipping point in trust and digital privacy

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Twitter feed of the President of the USA Donald Trump is seen displayed on a phone screen with … [+] Twitter logo in the background in this illustration photo taken on October 18, 2020. (Photo Illustration by Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

NurPhoto via Getty Images

With an expected 6.4 billion smart home devices in use by the end of 2023, homes will be saturated with smart devices and virtual assistants. And, with Google and Amazon publicly acknowledging, they follow their users’ conversations in their homes. Everyone is listening. 
On October 6, 2020, the US House of Representatives Judiciary Committee’s Antitrust Subcommittee issued a 400 page report on their findings after a 16 month investigation competition in the digital economy and the monopoly that Apple, Amazon, Google and Facebook have in the marketplace.
America’s distrust in big tech is increasing.

Recommended For YouA recent study of 1,000 adults aged 16-54+ published by WhistleOut in October 2020 revealed that big tech privacy worries have escalated.
The report found that 80% of Americans think at least one tech giant is listening in on their conversations with Facebook at 68%; TikTok at 53%; and Google at 45%. But only 18% said they had deleted Facebook because of privacy concerns.

Two-thirds of respondents polled said they were targeted for …

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