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‘This is not a Miss America contest’: Sexism in science, research is challenged

‘this is not a miss america contest’: sexism in science, research is challenged

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With the high-pressure interviews online because of the coronavirus, Robinson, a 26-year-old medical student at the University of Minnesota, went looking for tips on social media etiquette for medical students as part of her preparation.High in the search results was an article she thought might help. Published in the Journal of Vascular Surgery, it detailed “unprofessional social media content” among young vascular surgeons. But as she read, Robinson said, she became increasingly disgusted.The authors had studied the social media accounts of surgeons without their knowledge or permission. Among their criteria for “unprofessional” was not only appearing intoxicated or making offensive comments about colleagues or patients but “provocative posing in bikinis/swimwear.”Robinson took to Twitter, where she expressed her frustration with the mostly male-written paper’s take on professionalism. “I’ll say it: I wear bikinis. I am going to be a doctor,” she tweeted alongside an image of herself wearing a green bikini top and shorts.She encouraged other medical professionals to share their “professional swimwear” using the hashtag ­#MedBikini.The paper hadn’t generated much comment when it was published online in December 2019.But #MedBikini garnered thousands of tweets in multiple countries and languages — many …

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Tomorrow’s challenges in science and politics: Magazine offers in-depth takes on these U.S. issues

tomorrow’s challenges in science and politics: magazine offers in-depth takes on these u.s. issues

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This year has challenged leaders, researchers and the public with thorny scientific questions, from the coronavirus pandemic to widespread misinformation on scientific issues.The magazine is a collaboration of the Aspen Institute, a think tank that brings together a variety of public figures and private individuals to tackle thorny social issues, the digital science magazine Leapsmag and GOOD, a social impact company.It’s packed with 15 in-depth articles about science with a view toward our campaign year.Among them are the results of an August survey on adult Americans’ science priorities that show strong national support for basic science research, a piece on immigrant scientists, and a report on scientific issues facing the Navajo Nation and other Native communities.There are also tips on how to avoid social media misinformation and a thought-provoking piece on how scientific experts are made into celebrities, sometimes with disastrous results.“We need science for our health. We need science for our society. And we need science for our nation,” the editors write. “We hope readers of various ages, races, and ideologies will discover how science can be a universal framework for understanding and solving shared problems, and how diverse stakeholders can ensure America stays …

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Boris Johnson is learning that in politics you cannot simply ‘follow the science’

boris johnson is learning that in politics you cannot simply ‘follow the science’

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Opinion

Coronavirus

Boris Johnson is learning that in politics you cannot simply ‘follow the science’

David Runciman

The prime minister is trying to pretend that nakedly political decisions are driven by data. But almost no one buys it

Boris Johnson leaving Downing Street.
Photograph: John Sibley/Reuters

What happened to following the science? In the spring, when Boris Johnson and his scientific advisers were proceeding in lockstep, there was no disagreement about the necessity of shutting the country down. Now the government is coming to its own conclusions about what is needed, and the scientists on the Sage advisory group have started distancing themselves from No 10’s decisions.
Critics complain that the politicians are chancing it rather than being led by the evidence. But as the German sociologist Max Weber argued a century ago, politics can never really follow the science. Pretending that it can is where the trouble starts.
Weber believed that politics and science do not mix. In the end, political decision-making has to rest on personal judgment – there is no scientific manual to tell leaders what to do. More to the point, scientists are not well suited to making those decisions. They want the facts to speak …

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‘Science of communication’: UCSD experts say clarity and honesty are keys to building trust in science

‘science of communication’: ucsd experts say clarity and honesty are keys to building trust in science

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Trust in science and how scientists can help preserve it through communication was among the topics of an Oct. 22 webinar focusing on issues surrounding the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic.The event featured a panel of experts presented by UC San Diego’s division of biological sciences and research communications program.Difficulty in trust stems from “how we communicate about different issues,” said Sherry Seethaler, director of education initiatives for UCSD’s division of physical sciences and co-leader of the research communications program. “As scientists, as communicators, we have a job to do to make sure the information we’re giving is comprehensible and that audiences can use it to make decisions.”Kimberly Prather, a professor of atmospheric chemistry at UCSD’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography, said that “as a scientist who communicates to the public, I can understand the confusion.”Early in the coronavirus pandemic, she said, “we were told transmission occurs mainly through these large droplets” from people coughing and sneezing, with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention focusing on distance between people and surface sanitization. She showed a March 28 tweet from the World Health Organization that read “#COVID-19 is NOT airborne.”“I’ve spent the last six months …

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Hooked On Science – Make a Pumpkin Float in the Air – WDEF

hooked on science – make a pumpkin float in the air – wdef

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SCIENCE SAFETYPLEASE follow these safety precautions when doing any science experiment.• ALWAYS have an adult present.• ALWAYS wear the correct safety gear while doing any experiment.• NEVER eat or drink anything while doing any experiment.• REMEMBER experiments may require marbles, small balls, balloons, and other small parts. Those objects could become a CHOKING HAZARD. Adults are to perform those experiments using these objects. Any child can choke or suffocate on uninflated or broken balloons. Keep uninflated or broken balloons away from children.
INGREDIENTS• Hair Dryer• Styrofoam Pumpkin
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INSTRUCTIONSSTEP 1: Turn the hair dryer to the lowest setting and point the stream of air upward.STEP 2: Place the pumpkin into the stream of air and observe. Provide evidence of the effects of balance and unbalanced forces on the motion of the pumpkin.STEP 3: Turn the hair dryer to the highest setting and point the stream of air upward.STEP 4: Place the pumpkin into the stream of air and observe. Compare the effects of the different strengths of air flowing from the hair dryer, on the motion of the pumpkin.
EXPLANATIONThe stream of air, flowing from the hair dryer, forces the pumpkin upward. Gravity pulls the pumpkin downward. Where the …

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Learn about data science and coding with Fei Fei, the hero from the Netflix Original, ‘Over the Moon’ – The Official Microsoft Blog

learn about data science and coding with fei fei, the hero from the netflix original, ‘over the moon’ – the official microsoft blog

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This summer, Microsoft launched the Global Skills Initiative aimed at helping 25 million people worldwide acquire new digital skills. And since that announcement, we’ve helped 10 million people gain skills to better navigate digital transformation.
We believe it’s imperative to help everyone who wants it to have access to learning technology that powers the digital economy. Those who create technology will shape our future, and there shouldn’t be barriers to learning the skills required to do so. We’re helping prepare today’s learners for jobs of tomorrow in multiple technical fields, from development to data science and machine learning, and more. Our goal is to ignite the passion to solve important problems relevant to their lives, families and communities.
One way we bring that goal to life is through story-driven partnerships with leading creators like Netflix. We began that journey with NASA, “Wonder Woman 1984” and the Smithsonian Learning Labs. And now, we’re excited to release a new learning experience featuring a young female hero who has a passion for science and is empowered by her intelligence to explore space! This has already been an exciting week for space developments at Microsoft – now we want to help you …

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Science journal editors shouldn’t contribute to politicizing science – STAT

science journal editors shouldn’t contribute to politicizing science – stat

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When the editors of some of the world’s leading science journals agree on something, it is generally safe to assume that they are correct. So when prominent journals like Science, Nature, and the New England Journal of Medicine recently published editorials excoriating President Trump’s deadly bungling of the pandemic response and suppression of scientific activity, the editors accurately spotlighted the troubling deficiencies of the current administration.
But in advocating against or endorsing a presidential candidate, these editors made a grave error. In taking this extraordinary step, they made themselves vulnerable to charges of bias, overstepped their roles as science editors, and succumbed to the politicization of science that they and many other scientists find so alarming.
At first glance, these appear to be similar to run-of-the-mill newspaper endorsements. This analogy, however, is not quite right. At a newspaper, there is a wall between the news operation and the editorial office. It exists to prevent biases of the editorial staff from influencing news reporting. No such wall exists for science journals. The editors who write the editorials are the same ones who evaluate manuscripts and make the final decisions on whether to publish them.
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There’s another problem: …

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US presidential debate: Biden says he’ll choose science over fiction

us presidential debate: biden says he’ll choose science over fiction

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NEW YORK — With less than two weeks until election day, U.S. President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden held their second and final debate Thursday at Belmont University in Nashville, Tennessee.The event was moderated by Kristen Welker of NBC News, who selected fighting COVID-19, American families, race in America, climate change, national security and leadership as topics.The roughly 90-minute face-off came more than three weeks after the pair’s first, as the Oct. 15 second debate was canceled after Trump refused a virtual format even following his COVID-19 diagnosis.The Commission on Presidential Debates decided to protect the candidates’ speaking time by muting one candidate’s microphone when the other makes opening remarks in each segment. The first debate on Sept. 29 was marred by continual interruptions.According to the United States Elections Project’s early voting tracker, at least 48.5 million Americans have already voted in person or by mail.Here’s how the debate unfolded (U.S. Eastern time):11:50 p.m. According to a CNN poll conducted after the debate, 53% said Biden won, as opposed to 39% who said Trump did.On leadership10:35 p.m. Biden on his hypothetical inauguration address: “I represent all of you, whether you voted for …

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The engines of SARS-CoV-2 spread

the engines of sars-cov-2 spread

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Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has spread rapidly across the globe, causing epidemics that range from quickly controlled local outbreaks (such as New Zealand) to large ongoing epidemics infecting millions (such as the United States). A tremendous volume of scientific literature has followed, as has vigorous debate about poorly understood facets of the disease, including the relative importance of various routes of transmission, the roles of asymptomatic and presymptomatic infections, and the susceptibility and transmissibility of specific age groups. This discussion may create the impression that our understanding of transmission is frequently overturned. Although our knowledge of SARS-CoV-2 transmission is constantly deepening in important ways, the fundamental engines that drive the pandemic are well established and provide a framework for interpreting this new information.The majority of SARS-CoV-2 infections likely occur within households and other residential settings (such as nursing homes). This is because most individuals live with other people, and household contacts include many forms of close, high-intensity, and long-duration interaction. Both early contact tracing studies and a large study of more than 59,000 case contacts in South Korea found household contacts to be greater than six times more likely to be infected with SARS-CoV-2 than other close contacts (1, 2). …

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