Advertisement

Dinosaur species related to T. rex discovered in England

dinosaur species related to t. rex discovered in england

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

Return to homepage ×

Please subscribe to keep reading. You can cancel at any time.

Already a subscriber?

[class*=’col-‘].featured-package .title { background-color: #921A1C }
#lee-services-list.multiple .row > [class*=’col-‘].featured-package .triangle { border-color: #921A1C transparent; }
#lee-services-list.multiple .featured-package .label-tag { background-color: #570e10 }
}
]]>

Loading&hellp;

‘);
$(‘.lee-featured-subscription’).html(sFallBack);
}

function lee_formatPackage(oService){
try {
var bOnlyModal = true;
var oSettings = lee_getPackageSettings(oService.HomeMembership);
var newService = {};
if(parseInt(oService.WebFeatureFG) === 2) return false;
if(oService.WebStartPrice != ”){
var custom = JSON.parse(oService.WebStartPrice);
$.each(custom, function(k,v){
newService[k] = v;
});
}
if(bOnlyModal && newService.in_modal && newService.in_modal.toLowerCase() === ‘false’) return false;
if(!bOnlyModal && newService.not_members && newService.not_members.toLowerCase() === ‘true’) return false;

newService.has_featured_class = newService.featured ? ‘featured-package’ : ”;
newService.sort = parseInt((newService.sort) ? newService.sort : oSettings.sort);
newService.title = oSettings.title;
newService.level = oService.HomeMembership;
newService.html = oService.WebOfferHTML;
newService.disabled = newService.disable_purchase ? ‘disabled’ : ”;

var price = lee_formatPackagePrice(newService.start_price);
newService.start_price = price.cost;
newService.format_dollars = (price.format_dollars) ? price.format_dollars : ”;
newService.format_cents = (price.format_cents) ? price.format_cents : ”;
newService.start_at_rate = (newService.fixed_rate === ‘true’) ? ‘for the low price of’ : ‘starting at’;

if( !newService.term ) newService. …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE

Your hair can crack steel when it hits the right spot

your hair can crack steel when it hits the right spot

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

By Meagan CantwellAug. 12, 2020 , 12:00 PM

Although your hair is much softer than steel, razors typically only last for a handful of shaves. Previously, researchers attributed this to the sharp edge gradually wearing down after each use. But a new study reveals a different process at play.

Researchers used a powerful electron microscope to observe how the razor blades change after shaving. Instead of the razor slowly and evenly losing its sharp edge, they instead saw the formation of tiny cracks, then large chips of steel flaking off the edge of the blade.

By observing this cutting in action under a microscope (above) the researchers discovered the roughness of the blade’s edge made it vulnerable to splitting. Steel, although hard overall, varies in hardness throughout its microstructure. When the hair pushed on a softer region bordered by a harder region, the stress on this boundary fractured the blade, the team reports this month in Science.

Now that they understand why razor blades fail, the scientists hope to develop longer lasting alternatives. They are experimenting with using high pressure to mold steel into a sharp, even edge—and soon plan to test its durability. 

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “Your hair can crack steel when it hits the right spot”

Few Black educators win prestigious White House teaching award

few black educators win prestigious white house teaching award

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

Presidential Award for Excellence in Math and Science Teaching winner LeShundra Young and her advanced placement biology students at Germantown High School

LeShundra Young

By Jeffrey MervisAug. 12, 2020 , 11:15 AM

Diversity isn’t an official criterion for the Presidential Award for Excellence in Math and Science Teaching (PAEMST). But the three Black educators named to this year’s class of 107 winners announced last week say receiving the nation’s highest honor for precollege teaching makes them even more committed to fostering a more inclusive U.S. technical workforce.

“As a female and an African American, I hope I can be that face to students and teachers [from groups underrepresented in science] around the country,” says LeShundra Young, a biology teacher at Germantown High School in Madison, Mississippi. “It’s harder to relate to someone who doesn’t look like you.”

The lack of diversity in the 2019 class—the other Black educators selected are Pamela Hytower, a middle school math teacher in Georgia’s Carroll county, and Ashley Kearney, a high school math teacher in Washington, D.C.—isn’t unusual for the award. Winners are drawn from a pool of finalists submitted by each state, the District of Columbia, and U.S. …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “Few Black educators win prestigious White House teaching award”

Is showering overrated? Expert discusses the science of cleanliness

is showering overrated? expert discusses the science of cleanliness

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

Credit: CC0 Public Domain

Science has shown that the trillions of bacteria living inside our bodies play an important role in supporting our immune system and maintaining our physical well-being.
But what about the other trillions of bacteria, archaea, fungi, parasites and yes, viruses, taking up residence outside of our bodies on our skin? Do these microorganisms also play an important role in maintaining our health? Or—as the $100 billion personal care industry would lead us to believe—are they notorious germs that must be scrubbed off daily to satisfy a socially appropriate level of clean?
Yale School of Public Health Lecturer Dr. James Hamblin does his best to address those questions in his new book, “Clean—The New Science of Skin and the Beauty of Doing Less.” (Riverhead, 2020, 280 pages.) Hamblin, MPH ’18, is a preventive medicine specialist, staff writer for The Atlantic, and podcast host whose work has been featured in the New York Times and on NPR, PBS, Politico, MSNBC, the BBC and Vice.
The book is the result of five years of deep research that took Hamblin on a journey through soap factories, microbiology labs and the Manhattan offices of one of the world’s most popular high-end …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “Is showering overrated? Expert discusses the science of cleanliness”

New dinosaur species related to Tyrannosaurus rex discovered by scientists in England

new dinosaur species related to tyrannosaurus rex discovered by scientists in england

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

Paleontologists at the University of Southampton have spent months studying four bones that were found last year in the village of Shanklin, on the Isle of Wight, off the south coast of England. They finally determined that the bones were from the neck, back and tail of a new dinosaur “previously unknown to science,” according to a release from the university.The dinosaur would have measured about 4 meters (about 13 feet) long, and is a type of theropod dinosaur — a group of carnivores that typically walked on two legs instead of four, which includes the Tyrannosaurus rex. It lived in the Cretaceous period, about 115 million years ago, according to the release.Scientists named the dinosaur Vectaerovenator inopinatus — a name that refers to large air sacs in some of the bones, which are commonly seen in theropods, and which helped the researchers identify the species. The sacs are also seen in modern birds; they likely helped create an efficient breathing system in these dinosaurs, while also making the skeleton lighter. “We were struck by just how hollow this animal was — it’s riddled with air spaces. Parts of its skeleton must have been rather delicate,” said Chris Barker, a PhD …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “New dinosaur species related to Tyrannosaurus rex discovered by scientists in England”

Science and politics tied up in global race for a vaccine

science and politics tied up in global race for a vaccine

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

WASHINGTON — No, Russia is not having a Sputnik moment.

The announcement Tuesday by Russian President Vladimir Putin that his country was the first to approve a coronavirus vaccine did not provoke the awe and wonder of the Soviet Union’s launch of the first satellite into orbit in 1957. Instead it was met by doubts about the science and safety.

But it also underscored how, like the space race, the competition to have the first vaccine is about international rivalries as well as science. The first nation to develop a way to defeat the novel coronavirus will achieve a kind of moonshot victory and the global status that goes along with it.

That’s valuable to Putin, whose popularity at home has declined amid a stagnant economy and the ravages of the virus outbreak.

“To be the first one out of the block with a coronavirus vaccine would be a real — pardon the pun — shot in the arm for the Kremlin,” said Timothy Frye, a political science professor at Columbia University who specializes in post-Soviet politics.

Certainly, Russia is not alone in viewing a vaccine in this light. China, where the virus first emerged, has also raced to make progress on a vaccine. …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “Science and politics tied up in global race for a vaccine”

Dr. John Wallace | Good science takes time — even during a pandemic | Richmond County Daily Journal

dr. john wallace | good science takes time — even during a pandemic | richmond county daily journal

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

Good science takes time. This has always been clear to those of us doing health research — less so to the general public. In the pursuit of treatments for COVID-19, we need to manage expectations about what’s not just possible, but also desirable.
Finding a vaccine is difficult work, but it’s not like finding a needle in a haystack. Scientists start from a place of knowledge. Researchers around the world are already working on more than 150 possible vaccines, with 22 in human trials. There are also thousands of previously developed pharmaceuticals in testing. A vaccine for COVID-19 is quite likely to arrive faster than any before it. Yet despite all that, we need to remember that it will take many months, likely years. And, frankly, it should.
Why so long? Because we need time to do it right, no matter what incentives, resources and pressures are applied. Ensuring safety is especially critical for older people, who are more susceptible to COVID-19 and other health issues. But it matters to us all.
A COVID-19 vaccine will be administered rapidly to billions of people with a vast range of genetic, health and environmental circumstances. Testing these populations and subpopulations will require immense …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “Dr. John Wallace | Good science takes time — even during a pandemic | Richmond County Daily Journal”

The Nat To Stay Closed Until 2021 But Science Never Sleeps

the nat to stay closed until 2021 but science never sleeps

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

Credit: San Diego Natural History Museum
Above: At the San Diego Natural History Museum, an Allosaurus wears a mask to remind visitors to take COVID-19 precautions during the museum’s brief reopening in July 2020.

The San Diego Natural History Museum announced Friday that they will remain closed through at least the end of the year. Recognizing the volatile nature of the pandemic, the museum cited the need to have a fixed goal, protect the community and make better use of resources.

After a very brief reopening in early July, the museum shut its doors again after San Diego’s coronavirus numbers put the county onto Governor Newsom’s watch list.

RELATED: A (Brief) Glimpse Of Reopening For San Diego Museums

Maintaining 100 current employees, the museum is shifting its staffing focus towards supporting the distance learning models for local schools and students, and connecting them to the natural environment in the region. Lesson plans, video series and interactive resources are ways that the Nat is looking to bring a traditional field trip experience into the current reality. The Nat is currently working with educators and in partnerships with nonprofits to plan and devise this work.

The museum is also working on new programs to …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “The Nat To Stay Closed Until 2021 But Science Never Sleeps”

Russia’s approval of a COVID-19 vaccine is less than meets the press release

russia’s approval of a covid-19 vaccine is less than meets the press release

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

An experimental COVID-19 vaccine made by a Russian research institute needs more testing, many scientists say.

Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation

By Jon CohenAug. 11, 2020 , 5:15 PM

Science’s COVID-19 reporting is supported by the Pulitzer Center and the Heising-Simons Foundation.

In a startling and confusing move, Russia claimed today it had approved the world’s first COVID-19 vaccine, as the nation’s Ministry of Health issued what’s called a registration certificate for a vaccine candidate that has been tested in just 76 people. The certificate allows the vaccine, developed by the Gamaleya Research Institute of Epidemiology and Microbiology in Moscow, to be given to “a small number of citizens from vulnerable groups,” including medical staff and the elderly, a Ministry of Health spokesperson tells ScienceInsider. But the certificate stipulates that the vaccine cannot be used widely until 1 January 2021, presumably after larger clinical trials have been completed.

Scientists around the world immediately denounced the certification as premature and inappropriate, as the Gamaleya vaccine has yet to complete a trial that convincingly shows it is safe and effective in a large group of people. Even some within Russia challenged the move. “It’s ridiculous,” says Svetlana Zavidova, a lawyer who heads the …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE Continue reading “Russia’s approval of a COVID-19 vaccine is less than meets the press release”