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Join the National Space Society for ‘A Day in Space,’ a celebration of spaceflight, this week

join the national space society for ‘a day in space,’ a celebration of spaceflight, this week

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On July 16, 2020, a unique online presentation from the National Space Society will bring the solar system to your doorstep. “A Day in Space” is a day-long virtual forum that promises some truly unique spaceflight and exploration experiences.In an exclusive interview with NSS President and television personality, Geoffrey Notkin, Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin will take you back into the heady years of the Space Race and plunge you into the future of the exploration of our solar system. Planetary scientist Alan Stern will take you on a journey to Pluto and beyond to tiny Arrokoth (formerly known as Ultima Thule), as he recalls how the hard-fought New Horizons probe ventured to the edge of the planetary system and unveiled its secrets. NASA engineer and NSS Senior Operating Officer Bruce Pittman tells us about the merging of Wernher von Braun and Gerard O’Neill’s visions to form the National Space Society.  (Image credit: National Space Society)Billionaire NewSpace financier Steve Jurvetson tells the thrilling tale of investing in SpaceX in some of their darkest moments, supporting disruptive innovation with Planet Labs, and the future of orbital space tourism and investing in the space business. Jet Propulsion Laboratory chief engineer Rob Manning and …

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NASA astronaut Stephanie Wilson on going to the moon, Mars and leading the next generation

nasa astronaut stephanie wilson on going to the moon, mars and leading the next generation

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NASA astronaut Stephanie Wilson is ready and excited for the future of space exploration.Earlier this year (before the COVID-19 pandemic) Space.com met up with NASA astronaut Stephanie Wilson, a veteran of three spaceflights who has logged more than 42 days in space, at the Cradle of Aviation Museum in Long Island, New York. Wilson, who is one of 17 NASA astronauts eligible to become the first woman to step foot on the moon in 2024 as part of NASA’s Artemis program, shared her thoughts on the future of space exploration and her advice for new explorers dreaming of joining the Artemis generation. With regard to her lunar prospects, Wilson said, “I am of course excited to be included among the group and look forward to whoever the first woman is and the women who follow as part of the Artemis program to continue our studies of the moon, continue to descend down to the surface in a lander and hopefully to build a lunar base there on the moon and continue our journey from the Gateway orbiting laboratory.” The “Gateway,” Wilson refers to the Lunar Orbital Platform-Gateway, a proposed NASA program that would orbit around the moon and allow astronauts to …

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A 19-year-old aspiring astronaut is the only person who’s attended every NASA space camp. She’s already positioning herself for a mission to Mars.

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Alyssa Carson is part of a group of young people working to position themselves to be the first astronauts to go to Mars.Carson, who is now 19, has attended every NASA space camp and was the youngest person to graduate from the Advanced Space Academy.Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Alyssa Carson attended her first space camp at 5 years old. She graduated from the Advanced Space Academy program at 16, the youngest person ever to do so. Before the pandemic hit, the rising college sophomore had planned to spend her summer flying airplanes. The eventual goal: fly to Mars. Carson is one of a small group of young people who are already positioning themselves to be astronauts in the US’s next phase of space exploration. They are attending advanced preparation programs and building social media personas to put themselves on NASA’s radar now, all with an eye towards being in the astronaut class sent to the red planet in the next couple of decades. The group, mostly teenagers, talks online about the latest developments in space exploration and works to broadcast their interest to a wider audience. Carson’s online personality is NASA Blueberry — she uses the name on Twitter, …

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How to Plan a Space Mission

how to plan a space mission

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In October of 2017, Rob Weryk discovered an interstellar object in his hotel room at the Marriott in Provo, Utah. Weryk, an astronomer and postdoctoral fellow at the University of Hawaii, was in town for the forty-ninth meeting of the American Astronomical Society’s Division for Planetary Sciences. One morning, before heading off for a day of presentations, he opened his laptop to go through data he had downloaded from a telescope called Pan-STARRS, which is situated at the Haleakala Observatory, on Maui. The panoramic telescope stares fixedly at vast fields of the night sky, searching for changes over time. Special software flags anything that moves for review.Weryk noticed that, on October 19th, something new had been detected. Visually, it was uninterpretable—a dot, or maybe noise in the image. Still, once the movement had been spotted, it was possible to go back in time, locating it in the pre-discovery, or “precovery,” data. Weryk used these previous observations to reconstruct the object’s flight path. It behaved oddly: unlike everything else in the solar system, from dust motes to Jupiter, it didn’t seem gravitationally tethered to the sun. As he investigated, an astonishing picture emerged. Long-period comets, which are …

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NASA implements changes to planetary protection policies for moon and Mars missions – SpaceNews

nasa implements changes to planetary protection policies for moon and mars missions – spacenews

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WASHINGTON — NASA announced July 9 two new directives regarding planetary protection for missions to the moon and Mars that implement recommendations of an independent review board last year.
The two directives, announced by NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine during a “Moon Dialogs” webinar, are part of an effort by NASA to modernize guidelines that are decades old and which the agency believes could hinder its long-term human exploration plans.
The directives reflect “how NASA has evolved on its thinking as it relates to forward and backward harmful biological contamination on the surface of the moon and, of course, on Mars,” Bridenstine said.
The first of what are formally known as NASA Interim Directives revises planetary protection classification of the moon. Mission to the moon had been in Category 2, which required missions to document any biological materials on board but set no cleanliness standards on them. That classification was driven by concerns spacecraft could contaminate water ice at the lunar poles.
Under the new directive, most of the moon will be placed in Category 1, which imposes no requirements on missions. The exceptions will be the polar regions — north of 86 degrees north latitude and south of 79 degrees south latitude — which will remain in Category 2. …

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How modest satellites are radically remaking space exploration

how modest satellites are radically remaking space exploration

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Enlarge / An Electron rocket launches in August 2019 from New Zealand.Sam Toms/Rocket LabAt the beginning of this yr, a team of NASA experts agonized in excess of which robotic missions they should really opt for to take a look at our Photo voltaic Method. Scientists from all-around the United States experienced submitted far more than 20 intriguing concepts, such as whizzing by asteroids, diving into lava tubes on the Moon, and hovering in the Venusian ambiance.Finally, NASA selected four of these Discovery-course missions for further review. In numerous months, the space company will pick two of the four missions to fully fund, each individual with a cost cap of $450 million and a launch late in this decade. For the shedding tips, there may well be much more probabilities in upcoming years—but until new possibilities arise, experts can only strategy, wait, and hope.This is additional or fewer how NASA has completed planetary science for decades. Experts appear up with all fashion of excellent thoughts to solution issues about our Solar Method then, NASA announces an chance, a feeding frenzy ensues for individuals constrained slots. Finally, one or two missions get picked and fly. The total process frequently will …

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How small satellites are radically remaking space exploration

how small satellites are radically remaking space exploration

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Enlarge / An Electron rocket launches in August 2019 from New Zealand.Sam Toms/Rocket Lab

At the beginning of this year, a group of NASA scientists agonized over which robotic missions they should choose to explore our Solar System. Researchers from around the United States had submitted more than 20 intriguing ideas, such as whizzing by asteroids, diving into lava tubes on the Moon, and hovering in the Venusian atmosphere.
Ultimately, NASA selected four of these Discovery-class missions for further study. In several months, the space agency will pick two of the four missions to fully fund, each with a cost cap of $450 million and a launch late within this decade. For the losing ideas, there may be more chances in future years—but until new opportunities arise, scientists can only plan, wait, and hope.
This is more or less how NASA has done planetary science for decades. Scientists come up with all manner of great ideas to answer questions about our Solar System; then, NASA announces an opportunity, a feeding frenzy ensues for those limited slots. Ultimately, one or two missions get picked and fly. The whole process often takes a couple of decades from the initial idea to getting data …

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The quest to find signs of ancient life on Mars – France 24

the quest to find signs of ancient life on mars – france 24

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Paris (AFP)
Mars may now be considered a barren, icy desert but did Earth’s nearest neighbour once harbour life? It is a question that has preoccupied scientists for centuries and fired up sci-fi imaginings.Now three space exploration projects are gearing up to launch some of the most ambitious bids yet to find an answer.Scientists believe that four billion years ago the two planets both had the potential to nurture life — but much of Mars’ intervening history is an enigma.The new Mars probes from the United States, United Arab Emirates and China will launch this summer.Their goal is not to find Martian life — scientists believe nothing would survive there now — but to search for possible traces of past lifeforms.These vast and costly programmes could prove futile. But astrobiologists say the red planet is still our best hope for finding a record of life on other planets.Mars is “the only planet with concrete chances of finding traces of extraterrestrial life because we know that billions of years ago it was inhabitable,” said Jean-Yves Le Gall, president of French space agency CNES in a conference call with journalists this week.Le …

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NASA Updates Guidelines on How to Prevent Contamination in Solar

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As more launches are being scheduled to explore our solar system, NASA has unveiled new guidelines to protect the planets and moons from harmful contamination.
The agency released two NASA Interim Directives (NIDs) that detail new requirements for human and robotic missions. The aim is to shield the planetary bodies, namely the moon and Mars, from any possible biological contamination that originated from Earth, which has the potential to interfere with or invalidate important scientific research.
“We’re trying to balance the interests of the science community, the interest of the human exploration community and the interest of the commercial community,” NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said during a “Moon Dialogs” webinar hosted by the nonprofit Secure World Foundation.
It’s important that future missions leave behind “a pristine environment so we have the ability to know that what we discover in the future was not something that was left there by us. … We have to make sure that we are inventorying every kind of biological substance and even nonbiological substance—organics for example—that could leave something behind on the moon that could be problematic for future research.”
These NIDs come on the heels of the Artemis Accords, a new …

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NASA updates policies to protect the moon and Mars from human germs

nasa updates policies to protect the moon and mars from human germs

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NASA updates policies to protect the moon and Mars from human germs that may hitchhike on astronauts in a bid to not contaminate samples returning to EarthNASA is set to send crewed missions to the moon in 2024 and Mars in the 2030sThe agency is updating its policies that protect outer space from human germs The moon has been classified in two categories to help astronauts prepareOne part does not hold life and does not have any requirementsThe other is filled with craters that have water ice and may hold lifeHuman microbes are not allowed on Mars and NASA will work on solutionsThe idea is to not contaminate the surfaces where samples may be pulled from By Stacy Liberatore For Dailymail.com Published: 15:38 EDT, 10 July 2020 | Updated: 15:39 EDT, 10 July 2020 As NASA gears up to send humans to the moon and Mars it is also working on new advances to protect the space terrains from human germs.The American space agency released updates to its Planetary Protection Policies that provide new requirements for both astronaut and robotic missions.The added policies note that no biological matter is to be left on or around the moon and h humans are to not contaminate any …

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