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Climate change real, let’s find solutions

climate change real, let’s find solutions

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This state and country need to get serious about tackling climate change. It is one of the biggest threats facing the planet in the 21st century. Reducing carbon emissions through the use of renewable energy is a no brainer in my thoughts. Developing wind, solar, and hydro technology not only benefits the environment, but it adds new jobs as well. It can spur economic growth in towns that could desperately use the help. We can see the results of global warming happening currently! The wildfires that are currently raging in Northern California and Southern Oregon are examples of climate change in effect. The wildfires in that area are starting earlier and getting worse each year. People’s houses and livelihoods are being ruined. Climate change is the cause of it. If we as a state don’t do anything to tackle climate change; catastrophic weather events are only going to get worse.

That is why I am disappointed in Governor Phil Scott’s decision to veto the climate change bill that was recently passed by the legislature. If I was a State Representative, I would vote to override the veto of that bill. Vermonters should have the ability to hold the …

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The Art of the Climate Change War | The Regulatory Review

the art of the climate change war | the regulatory review

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Twitter Facebook LinkedIn Email Print Font Size:The world needs a new strategy to fight climate change aggressively and effectively.Font Size:Humanity is its own enemy in the war against the warming of our planet. To our peril, policymakers have ignored a deep insight attributed to Sun Tzu, from the fifth century B.C. Chinese military treatise, The Art of War: “Strategy without tactics is the slowest route to victory. Tactics without strategy is the noise before defeat.”Environmental advocates, major international environmental agreements, and domestic policy programs have traditionally focused on a myopic one-prong tactic to fighting climate change. That prong is mitigation, the curbing of emissions. A better, well-crafted strategy to address the risks posed by climate change, however, would engage three prongs: continuing mitigation, while adding adaptation and amelioration to the armamentarium.Were Sun Tzu writing on climate change today, he might describe the mitigation-only approach by invoking the metaphor of fighting a modern war relying solely on ground forces, while ignoring what air and naval forces could contribute. Consistent with his approach to war, he would likely support investments in adaptation and resilience to offset some of the damages associated with warmer temperatures. He would …

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Climate change threatens breeding birds: Birds risk starvation if they start breeding early due to climate change

climate change threatens breeding birds: birds risk starvation if they start breeding early due to climate change

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The researchers, who examined decades of data on weather, food availability and breeding in Tree Swallows, say that the timing of when to breed and when food is available is becoming decoupled for some animals — highlighting the complexity behind how organisms respond to climate change. “Simply moving dates earlier to track climate change isn’t necessarily risk free. Riskier conditions earlier in the year can expose animals to unintended consequences when responding to bouts of unusually warm spring weather,” says Ryan Shipley, postdoctoral fellow at the Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior and first author on the paper.
In recent years, studies have raised concerns about whether or not species can adapt, or “keep pace” with climate change. Particular emphasis has been placed on phenology — the timing of life cycle events such as breeding and migration — and the importance of adjusting this to track rising temperatures and earlier arrivals of spring. But the authors say that breeding earlier may place animals at greater risk of exposure to inclement weather events that tend to occur more frequently earlier in the year. They found that Tree Swallows had been advancing breeding by three days every decade for the last 30 years, …

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This Bay Area Spice Company Is Fighting Climate Change and Colonialism | KQED

this bay area spice company is fighting climate change and colonialism | kqed

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He’s also using his platform on social media to encourage people to talk about their own food stories and think through food and waste — he’s planning to continue hosting Instagram lives to talk about recipes, and topics like kitchen composting.As a self-described queer desi, Sanathra talks about tasty food and the importance of supporting regenerative farming with equal enthusasm. He sees his work as an act against colonialism. “Having everything at your fingertips is a very colonial thought-process,” Sanathra said, “is there a way to encourage people to purchase locally, support local economies? And also support international regenerative farming?” he asks.
Each package comes with a jar of spices as well as recipes to try.
At the moment, he’s working with an organization that works with farmers in Southern India on the border of Kerala and Tamil Nadu. In addition to the recipes, Sanathra intends on bringing stories of the local farmers as well. The region of southern India he is currently sourcing some of the spices from has been impacted by climate change and sees less rainwater. “Cardamon is intensive on resources — a lot of cardamom farmers are using groundwater,” he said as we went on …

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Flowers are changing their colors to adapt to climate change

flowers are changing their colors to adapt to climate change

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Alpine cinquefoil flowers picked in 1977 (left) and 1999 (right) have noticeably different ultraviolet pigment patterns.

Matthew Koski

By Lucy HicksSep. 28, 2020 , 3:00 PM

As the world’s climate changes, plants and animals have adapted by expanding into new territory and even shifting their breeding seasons. Now, research suggests that over the past 75 years, flowers have also adapted to rising temperatures and declining ozone by altering ultraviolet (UV) pigments in their petals.

Flowers’ UV pigments are invisible to the human eye, but they attract pollinators and serve as a kind of sunscreen for plants, says Matthew Koski, a plant ecologist at Clemson University. Just as UV radiation can be harmful to humans, it can also damage a flower’s pollen. The more UV-absorbing pigment the petals contain, the less harmful radiation reaches sensitive cells.

Previously, Koski and colleagues found that flowers exposed to more UV radiation—usually those growing at higher elevations or closer to the equator—had more UV pigment in their petals. He then wondered whether two factors affected by human activity, damage to the ozone layer and temperature changes, also influenced the UV pigments.

To find out, Koski and colleagues examined plant collections from North America, Europe, and Australia dating back …

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Ready to fight climate change? Website launched by Duke undergrads aim

ready to fight climate change? website launched by duke undergrads aim

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DURHAM — Climate change is one of the biggest threats to the plant today, but many people struggle with how they can personally make a difference.
Not anymore.
An international group of GenZ environmentalists — led by Duke undergrad Saad Ibrahim — has launched “You Change Earth,” an interactive site that aims to guide individuals to action.

Funded by Duke’s Nicholas School of the Environment and tech founder Paul English, it provides users with personalized guide on how they can devote their time or money to most effectively reduce their carbon footprint.
“The goal of the project was to create a simple answer to the ever prevalent [question]: ‘What can I do about climate change’,” explained Ibrahim.
“There are millions of people out there who care deeply about the climate crisis, but there is no clear path for them to take action. We wanted to put in their hands an exact guide on how they can bring about meaningful change in their lives and communities.”

How it works: After answering a few short questions on the site, visitors are directed towards a step-by-step guide that shows them how they can start making a difference.
Examples include guides on how to move your …

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Joe Biden Wants to Make Almost Every Policy a Climate Change Policy

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Joe Biden’s plans to make climate change a major focus across his administration if he wins the White House would have significant ramifications for both businesses and consumers. The Democratic nominee seeks not just mass use of electric cars, as California’s governor mandated last week, but further changes across the economy, government and society: Electrified public and freight transportation, power plants running without greenhouse-gas emissions, and the placement of climate concerns at the center of social policies and…

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How climate change affects pandemics

how climate change affects pandemics

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Numerous scientists have studied how the 1918 flu spread to become the deadliest pandemic in history and which interventions worked, research that is becoming increasingly relevant during the current coronavirus crisis.But little research has been done on how environmental conditions affected the 1918 pandemic — until now.The 1918 flu coincided with the final years of the World War I, and it’s been well documented that heavy rain and cold temperatures impacted many battles. Now, a new study reveals that the cold, rainy weather was part of a once-in-a-century climate anomaly that occurred from 1914 to 1919 and added to the severity of the 1918 pandemic.

“We knew before, of course, from photos and eyewitness testimonies that the battlefields of Europe were really muddy and rainy and soldiers died of all sorts of exposure, even drowning in the mud and the trenches sometimes. What is news is that in fact it was a six-year anomaly and not just one or two instances,” said lead researcher Alexander More, a research associate at Harvard University’s history department and an associate professor at the University of Maine’s Climate Change Institute.A team of more than a dozen scientists collected and analyzed an Alpine ice core to reconstruct the …

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‘If COVID-19 Doesn’t Kill Us, Climate Change Will’: World Leaders At Annual United Nations Meeting

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Sounding alarm about climate change, some world leaders, at this week’s annual United Nations meeting warned, “If COVID-19 doesn’t kill us, climate change will.”The warning comes amid Siberia reporting its warmest temperature on record this year and the drastic melting of ice caps in Greenland and Canada.”We are already seeing a version of environmental Armageddon,” Fiji’s Prime Minister Frank Bainimarama was quoted as saying by Associated Press.Bainimarama cited the wildfires in the Western US and also pointed out that the ice chunk sliding into the sea in Greenland was larger than a number of island nations. He said that while this was supposed to be the year “we took back our planet,” the pandemic has diverted the resources and attention from what could have been the marquee issue at the current UN gathering.The Alliance of the Small Island States and the Least Developed Countries Group said, “In another 75 years, many … members may no longer hold seats at the United Nations if the world continues on its present course.”Meanwhile, the UN global climate summit has been postponed to late 2021.As per the 2015 Paris climate accord’s main goal, the rise in global temperatures should be limited to 2 …

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