Privacy, blockchain and the Internet of Things: Can we keep control of our own identities?

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New research from The University of South Australia indicates there are key privacy issues inherent to current blockchain platforms, suggesting greater effort should be made to refine the technology so it conforms to privacy rights and expectations.

Given how much we depend on it today, it’s easy to forget that only 20 years ago, the Internet didn’t really feature in most people’s lives—in 2000, there were just 361 million web users globally, or about 6 percent of the world’s population.
Now, in 2020, an estimated 4.57 billion people access the Net regularly, with almost 90 percent of Australians plugged into the online universe.
The rise of digital connectivity has brought profound benefits in some areas, but serious disruption has followed in others and, increasingly, people recognize the need to avoid techno-pitfalls in the future.
One of the biggest worries about our digital lives is privacy, and UniSA emerging technologies researcher, Dr. Kirsten Wahlstrom, believes the next generation of connected software and hardware could push the issue to breaking point.
“We’re at a really delicate point with this because, increasingly, societies and economies are organized around data, and that has huge implications for privacy,” Dr. Wahlstrom says.
“The main problem is, we’re …

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