Opinion: Boosting financial literacy in schools isn’t enough

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Melissa Leong is the author of the personal finance guide Happy Go Money When I was little, I learned about money through a shoebox. My father sealed a small, white box with tape, cut a slit into one side and scrawled my name on it in capital letters. It was our version of a piggy bank. Story continues below advertisement Money went in and it never came out. I have no idea how much I even accumulated because I never counted it. I just kept stuffing birthday and holiday gift money into it. And although at any time, I could’ve stuck my fingers in and fished out a $20 note, I never did because I was obsessed with cash staying inside the box. I suspect that, like me, many Canadians grew up with little to no formal financial education and figured it out, or fumbled, on their own, with a first job, a first credit card, etc. So, with Ontario introducing financial literacy at all levels of elementary school in its new math curriculum, it seems we should rejoice. After all, won’t financial education equip young people with the knowledge, skills and confidence to take charge of their money …

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