New antitumor vaccines control melanoma growth in preclinical models

Advertisement

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Sep 11 2020
Combining their expertise in protein engineering and synthetic DNA technology, scientists at The Wistar Institute successfully delivered nanoparticle antitumor vaccines that stimulated robust CD8 T cell immunity and controlled melanoma growth in preclinical models.

Study results were published online in Cancer Immunology Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, and support exploration of this immunotherapy approach for additional cancer types.

Nanovaccines consist of extremely small (nano) particles -; similar in size to bacteria and viruses -; used to display multiple copies of an antigen and able to elicit strong immune responses. The team previously reported on using DNA instructions to launch in vivo production of nanoparticle vaccines (DLnano-vaccines).

DLnano-vaccines assembled in the body produced stronger immune responses than protein based nanoparticle vaccines in an infectious disease setting, especially inducing CD8 T cell responses.


We wanted to test DLnano-vaccines for cancer immunotherapy and obtain proof of concept that this platform could be successfully applied in the cancer field, thanks to its effectiveness at prompting CD8 T cells responses.”

Daniel Kulp, Ph.D, Study Co-Corresponding Author and Associate Professor, Vaccine & Immunotherapy Center, Wistar Institute


Kulp also specializes in nanotechnology and protein engineering …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE