Is your software responsible?

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PlanetGiven the rapid rate of adoption of digital technologies, even the smallest of energy inefficiencies have the potential to get amplified and hurt our planet. For instance, according to estimates, data centres currently account for 2% of the overall electricity consumption, worldwide—a number that could increase to 8% by 2030. Hence, adopting power-aware computing principles and data centre optimisation is crucial. An example of how this can be achieved is Google’s pilot project that uses machine learning models to predict power usage efficiency (PUE) at its data centres; the ML algorithm has helped Google bring down its overall energy consumption by 15%. Adopting greener cloud server architectures such as containerisation and serverless computing and deploying energy-efficient hardware at the edge—such as graphics processing units (GPUs) and field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs)—can help companies save energy costs as well as minimise their carbon footprint. Organisational requirementsOrganisational requirement is the third and arguably the most influential pillar of software design. Every organisation needs its software to meet certain criteria such as reliability, scalability, security, flexibility, agility, and resilience. Software should be developed in way that fulfils an organisation’s need for actionable intelligence—a pre-requisite for agile and informed decision-making. A responsible software …

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