Hurricane Sally Is a Slow-Moving Threat. Climate Change Might Be Why.

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BAYOU LA BATRE, Ala. — Hurricane Sally parked itself over the Gulf of Mexico on Tuesday, churning slowly and lumbering at a sluggish pace toward land, representing a climate change reality that has made many hurricanes wetter, slower and more dangerous.Sally’s outer bands unleashed a relentless rain that began in the morning and continued unabated all day and into the night, threatening to deluge coastal communities in Alabama and Mississippi. Meteorologists worried — and almost marveled — as the storm pushed forward at a speed of just 2 miles per hour, shifting erratically in its path and intensity.Scientists saw Sally’s stall over the warm waters of the Gulf as yet another effect of climate change in the United States, coming as wildfires along the West Coast have incinerated millions of acres and sent foul air into the atmosphere as far away as Washington, D.C. A scorching summer — made worse by the burning of fossil fuels, experts say — led to dry conditions that helped turn this year’s wildfires into the worst ever recorded. Tracking Hurricane Sally’s Path: MapMap showing the storm’s expected path.Fires were still burning out of control in Northern California and the Pacific Northwest …

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