How to Become a U.S.-Based Digital Nomad

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Image: Dmytro Zinkevych (Shutterstock)The pandemic has impacted many aspects of our lives—including how we work. Some 35.2% of employees worked remotely in May, compared to only 8.2% in April, which may be a good or bad thing, depending on your perspective. But one positive aspect of remote work is the possibility of working from someplace else.AdvertisementWhile traveling abroad is on hold, remote employees may have the chance to work virtually from anywhere within the country—or may even trade in a permanent address to become digital nomads. While the possible change of scenery may be appealing, there are a few things to consider before packing your bags.Check with your employerBefore getting lost in short-term rental listings, talk to your employer about your plans. If you’re still a full-time W-2 employee, make sure the company (and your boss!) doesn’t have a problem with your travel arrangements. While it may not impact the quality of your work, there are some other reasons why it could be a problem—like taxes, for example. Working from another state could establish your company’s presence there, which could trigger a requirement for state-level payroll tax registration or paying corporate income taxes, …

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