How Much Online Learning Is Too Much? Schools’ Shift To Live Virtual Classes Sparks Pushback

Advertisement

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

Judith Hernandez never thought she’d miss the old remote learning.
When the pandemic confined her four children to their home this spring, their schools in Newark, N.J. distributed paper packets, loaned out laptops, and posted online assignments. Hernandez helped her children complete their work, while their teachers recorded short videos and checked in by phone or text. It wasn’t much, but it was manageable.

Judith Hernandez has four children in Newark schools, including her son, Baii. They now spend most of their day taking online classes, she said.

Courtesy of Judith Hernandez

Six months later, as the new school year starts with classrooms still closed, Hernandez’s children in grades 2-4 spend most of the school day in live video classes. Hernandez, who also has a newborn, scurries between her children, troubleshooting tech problems and urging them to stay focused.
Suddenly, it seems, remote learning has gone from on-your-own to always-on — and some families aren’t pleased.
“It’s supposed to be like normal class but it’s just not the same,” Hernandez said last week as classes started. “This whole computer thing is insane.”
With the coronavirus still untamed, an estimated 85% of school districts nationwide are …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE