Has coronavirus killed our chance to act on climate change?

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Ian Dunlop worries about his grandchildren. He worries time is running out.”We run the risk within the next probably five to 10 years, that we may trigger irreversible tipping points in the climate system,” he says.He used to be a fossil fuel industry executive. Now he advocates for action on climate change.Global warming of 1.5 degrees Celsius in the next 20 years or so is essentially baked in, according to the UN’s climate body — and Ian fears it won’t stop there.”Three degrees Celsius, the best national security experts in the world consider will be social chaos,” he says.”You can already see that and what happened with our bushfires. You look at major events like that and the social fabric really starts to break down very quickly.” Ian Dunlop was an executive in the oil, gas, and coal industry until the early 1990s.(Supplied)But he’s not without hope.We’re currently living through a life-changing, economy-twisting event: a global pandemic.Ian sees our response to coronavirus as a dress rehearsal for a much bigger challenge.”The only way we can really address climate change now is by some form of emergency action,” he says.”We’ve left it too late …

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