For many climate change finally hits home

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2020 has been a year of nonstop crises. For a while there, it was almost possible to forget an ongoing crisis that used to have our attention: climate change. But Nature found a way to remind us.In the Midwest, punishing 100-mile-per-hour winds. In the Southwest, a brutal succession of floods and droughts. On the coasts: a freakish number of devastating hurricanes.And in our Western states, historic mega-fires that sent a plume of ash and smoke all the way to the East Coast. More than four million acres have burned in California alone. To put that into perspective, that is larger than the state of Connecticut. “And these fires are still burning,” said Chief Daniel Berlant, assistant deputy director for Cal Fire, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. “Our climate here in California has been changing now for decades. In fact this year’s fire seasons are on average 75 days longer than they were in the ’70s. This year’s fire season will likely just roll right into 2021.”There is no end in sight,” he said. In the last 20 years, we’ve experienced twice the number of weather disasters as we did in the previous 20 years. Cost so far? About $3 …

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