Critics take aim at herd immunity, calling it ‘nonsense’ and a ‘nebulous’ idea

Advertisement

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

The Trump administration this week promoted a theory that calls for people at low risk of contracting COVID-19 to return to schools, sports, and the workplace, though officials have denied they are putting their support behind the increasingly controversial concept of herd immunity. The document cited Monday by White House officials during a call with reporters is called the Great Barrington Declaration, which states older people and the medically vulnerable should continue to stay home, and those at “minimal risk of death [should] live their lives normally to build up immunity to the virus through natural infection.” The White House denies it has considered a herd-immunity strategy.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told Good Morning America this week that the proposal is “nonsense,” while the Infectious Diseases Society of America said that “promoting the concept of ‘herd immunity’ as framed in a recently circulated document as an answer to the COVID-19 pandemic is inappropriate, irresponsible and ill-informed.” See also:There are seven coronavirus vaccine candidates being tested in the U.S. — here’s where they stand Herd immunity occurs when 50% to 90% of a population becomes immune to a virus. The idea is …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE