COVID-19 vaccines may be coming soon, but most Texans won’t get them …

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FALFURRIAS — After 8 a.m. on a fall Friday, a 31-foot white van drove down pockmarked streets, passed a public housing complex and pulled into the Falfurrias High School parking lot. Masked medical staff unloaded coolers filled with vaccines, then unpacked gloves and bandages. Others set out a hot pink sign bearing a handwritten message: “Free Flu Shots!”

The nonprofit Community Action Corporation of South Texas has given flu shots for years in Falfurrias, a city of some 5,000 with one major grocery store and a health clinic with a worn facade. The mobile unit, introduced this year, is meant to reach people who might not get vaccinated — those who live in remote areas, depend on family members or neighbors for transportation or don’t regularly see a doctor.

“We don’t have too many providers … our closest hospital is 45 minutes away,” said Maria Rodriguez-Casas, the school district’s superintendent. “So this accessibility is great.”

Now a vaccine for the coronavirus is on the horizon, and Gov. Greg Abbott has said the state is ready to …

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