COVID-19 Vaccines May Be Coming Soon, But Most Texans Won’t Get Them For Months. Here’s Why.

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After 8 a.m. on a fall Friday, a 31-foot white van drove down pockmarked streets, passed a public housing complex and pulled into the Falfurrias High School parking lot. Masked medical staff unloaded coolers filled with vaccines, then unpacked gloves and bandages. Others set out a hot pink sign bearing a handwritten message: “Free Flu Shots!”The nonprofit Community Action Corporation of South Texas has given flu shots for years in Falfurrias, a city of some 5,000 with one major grocery store and a health clinic with a worn facade. The mobile unit, introduced this year, is meant to reach people who might not get vaccinated — those who live in remote areas, depend on family members or neighbors for transportation or don’t regularly see a doctor.“We don’t have too many providers … our closest hospital is 45 minutes away,” said Maria Rodriguez-Casas, the school district’s superintendent. “So this accessibility is great.”Now a vaccine for the coronavirus is on the horizon, and Gov. Greg Abbott has said the state is ready to swiftly distribute doses to combat the pandemic, which has already claimed more than 20,000 lives in Texas and dealt the economy a severe blow. But health officials say …

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