Censorship Is about Power | National Review

Advertisement

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW:

( mj0007/Getty Images)

At NR, we know a thing or two about censorship. At its essence, it is an exercise in power, no? Your speech may do innocuous and fun and frivolous things, such as provide a new recipe, or recount the Little League game, or reminisce about last year’s vacation, or call the kids in for dinner. But what about when your speech turns political? What if it, say, attacks the Establishment’s preferred presidential candidate? Or not even attacks — merely raises doubts about him?

Advertisement

“What if” . . . leads straight to kapow!
Well, we can’t have that now, can we? Somebody suppress the links! Do we have a policy for that? No? Well, wing it. And when you’re done suspend the accounts!
What if your political speech expresses a disagreement about a public-policy matter, such as climate change? A thing once upon a time considered “debatable.” Hardy har har: Call the lawyers and sue the pants off National Review!
In the midst of a critical flash webathon seeking to raise funds so we can fight and punch and gnaw the Left, NR exists to do a lot of things. But at the core of our overall …

END ARTICLE PREVIEW

READ MORE FROM SOURCE ARTICLE