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Quantum Computing

quantum computing

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Quantum technology, particularly quantum information science and the development of future electronics, is considered to be one of the major technologies that would totally change human life and lead us into the Fourth Industrial Revolution. It lies at the heart of many future technologies because most of the future technologies – for example, artificial intelligence, the internet of things, and their future development and potential – are all based on and limited by the power of computation and communication. It is believed that only quantum information processing can fully allow AI and other relevant technologies to achieve their potential or even revolutionise them.  
We are now entering the era of the so-called second quantum revolution, where many intriguing quantum properties, such as superposition, entanglement and nonlocality, can be utilised to develop new technologies. Implementation of these quantum technologies combines a wide range of research, from quantum theory and algorithms to all aspects of quantum engineering in materials, devices, architectures and so on. Over the past decade, NCKU has put a lot of resources and manpower into quantum science and technology. This investment has led to the finest research outcomes in Taiwan and a new Center for Quantum Frontier of Research and Technology ( …

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IBM Cloud gets quantum-resistant cryptography

ibm cloud gets quantum-resistant cryptography

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IBM Corp. is looking to make enterprise workloads deployed on its public cloud resistant to tomorrow’s encryption-breaking quantum computers.
As a first step to that end, the company today introduced  “quantum-safe cryptography” capabilities for three services in IBM Cloud: Red Hat OpenShift on IBM Cloud, Cloud Kubernetes Service and Key Protect. Customers using the services can now secure data with an encryption algorithm that will have a better chance of withstanding future quantum attacks, according to the company. 
Today’s quantum systems possess only a small fraction of the computing power of a standard server. However, it’s believed that future systems with better hardware will be capable of performing certain calculations far faster than even the most powerful supercomputers. Breaking traditional encryption is one task at which tomorrow’s theoretical large-scale quantum computers are expected to be especially adept.
Of particular concern is the security of the network connections used to transport packets between consumer devices, “internet of things” systems and data centers worldwide. Most connections rely on an encryption scheme known as public-key cryptography to protect data in transit. It protects data by hiding the decryption key behind long sets of mathematical calculations that are too complex …

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IBM Announces New Cloud Services, Quantum Cryptography Support

ibm announces new cloud services, quantum cryptography support

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by Sharon Florentine • Nov 30, 2020
IBM today announced it is offering new cloud services and quantum-safe cryptography support for key management and application transactions in IBM Cloud. The new capabilities will help partners and customers better protect existing data and prepare for future threats, according to a statement from the company.
The new capabilities include Quantum Safe Cryptography Support, IBM Key Protect and extended Hyper Protect Crypto services for IBM Cloud, which will allow partners and customers to better protect sensitive data in the cloud, keep encryption keys secure throughout the entire lifecycle and secure data in transit, according to the statement.

New Cloud, Encryption Key and Quantum Cryptography Support
Quantum Safe Cryptography Support, which uses open standards and open source technology to create and leverage quantum-safe algorithms as data moves between enterprises and the cloud, according to the statement. IBM said this will mitigate the risk that hackers could harvest encrypted data today and then decrypt it later as quantum computing advances.
IBM Key Protect is a cloud-based service that provides lifecycle management for IBM Cloud services or client-built applications’ encryption keys. IBM Key Protect now allows for the use of quantum-safe cryptography enabled Transport Layer Security (TLS) connection – helping …

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IBM Cloud Delivers Quantum-Safe Cryptography and Hyper Protect Crypto Services to Help Protect Data in the Hybrid Era

ibm cloud delivers quantum-safe cryptography and hyper protect crypto services to help protect data in the hybrid era

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ARMONK, N.Y., Nov. 30, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — IBM (NYSE: IBM) today announced a series of cloud services and technologies designed to help clients maintain the highest available level of cryptographic key encryption protection to help protect existing data in the cloud1 and prepare for future threats that could evolve with advances in quantum computing. Pioneered by IBM Research scientists, the company is now offering quantum-safe cryptography support for key management and application transactions in IBM Cloud®, making it the industry’s most holistic quantum-safe cryptography approach to securing data available today.
The new capabilities include:

Quantum Safe Cryptography Support: Through the use of open standards and open source technology, this service enhances the standards used to transmit data between enterprise and Cloud, helping to secure data by using a quantum-safe algorithm.
Extended IBM Cloud Hyper Protect Crypto Services: New capabilities are available to enhance privacy of data in cloud applications, where data sent over the network to cloud applications and sensitive data elements like credit card numbers, are stored in a database that can be encrypted at application-level – supported by the industry’s highest level of cryptographic key encryption protection with ‘Keep Your Own Key’ (KYOK) capability.

“As our reliance on data grows …

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IBM wants to make quantum computing safer for everyone

ibm wants to make quantum computing safer for everyone

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In order to help protect existing data in the cloud and prepare for future threats that could evolve with advances in quantum computing, IBM has announced a new series of cloud services and technologies to aid clients in maintaining the highest available level of cryptograpic key encryption.These new services and technologies, that were first pioneered by IBM Research scientists, will allow the company to offer quantum-safe cryptography support for both key management and application transactions in IBM Cloud.Quantum computing will enable researchers to solve complex problems that even today’s most powerful supercomputers cannot solve. However, future fault-tolerant quantum computers could pose potential risks such as the ability to quickly break encryption algorithms. To mitigate these risks, IBM has developed a clear strategic agenda to help protect the long term security of its platforms and services.As the next step in this agenda, the company is bringing encryption capabilities built by IBM Research cryptographers to help clients with a quantum-safe cryptography approach for their data-in-transit within IBM Cloud. These new capabilities are designed to help enterprises prepare for future threats and can be useful in fending off attacks in which cybercriminals harvest encrypted data today in order to decrypt …

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Photon juggling: One big quantum processor from 100 little ones

photon juggling: one big quantum processor from 100 little ones

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The processing assembly for Google’s Sycamore quantum computer.In the not-terribly-distant past, the goal of quantum computing research was to achieve a milestone called quantum supremacy: the point in time when a quantum computer can, in practical terms, be considered superior to a classical, semiconductor-based computer for processing any task you give it. Certainly Google already made a big enough fuss about it. This is no longer true.  Engineers and scholars have since conceded that this is not possible — that a quantum device cannot supersede a classical device.  (Of course, it may seem a little too convenient that they should make this declaration now.)

The principal reason for this is not that a quantum computer (QC), once the plans for its development are fully realized, would somehow be inferior. A quantum computer is, and because of the nature of physics always will be, a quantum processor maintained and marshaled by a classical control system. Despite that title, “control” may be an imprecise word in this context. Although such devices may yet become the foundation for a new industry, they don’t really control quantum processing any more than a barbed wire fence controls a prison riot. More accurately, they control the …

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Quantum Algorithm Breakthrough

quantum algorithm breakthrough

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The Google Quantum Computer. Credit: Eric Lucero/Google, Inc.
Researchers led by City College of New York physicist Pouyan Ghaemi report the development of a quantum algorithm with the potential to study a class of many-electron quantums system using quantum computers. Their paper, entitled “Creating and Manipulating a Laughlin-Type ν=1/3 Fractional Quantum Hall State on a Quantum Computer with Linear Depth Circuits,” appears in the December issue of PRX Quantum, a journal of the American Physical Society. 
“Quantum physics is the fundamental theory of nature which leads to formation of molecules and the resulting matter around us,” said Ghaemi, assistant professor in CCNY’s Division of Science. “It is already known that when we have a macroscopic number of quantum particles, such as electrons in the metal, which interact with each other, novel phenomena such as superconductivity emerge.”
However, until now, according to Ghaemi, tools to study systems with large numbers of interacting quantum particles and their novel properties have been extremely limited. 
“Our research has developed a quantum algorithm which can be used to study a class of many-electron quantum systems using quantum computers. Our algorithm opens a new venue to use the new quantum devices to study problems which …

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Hitting the quantum ‘sweet spot’: Researchers find best position for atom qubits in silicon

hitting the quantum ‘sweet spot’: researchers find best position for atom qubits in silicon

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Atomic-scale image of two interacting donors in silicon. Credit: CQC2T

Researchers from the Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology (CQC2T) working with Silicon Quantum Computing (SQC) have located the ‘sweet spot’ for positioning qubits in silicon to scale up atom-based quantum processors.

Creating quantum bits, or qubits, by precisely placing phosphorus atoms in silicon—the method pioneered by CQC2T Director Professor Michelle Simmons—is a world-leading approach in the development of a silicon quantum computer.
In the team’s research, published today in Nature Communications, precision placement has proven to be essential for developing robust interactions—or coupling—between qubits.
“We’ve located the optimal position to create reproducible, strong and fast interactions between the qubits,” says Professor Sven Rogge, who led the research.
“We need these robust interactions to engineer a multi-qubit processor and, ultimately, a useful quantum computer.”
Two-qubit gates—the central building block of a quantum computer—use interactions between pairs of qubits to perform quantum operations. For atom qubits in silicon, previous research has suggested that for certain positions in the silicon crystal, interactions between the qubits contain an oscillatory component that could slow down the gate operations and make them difficult …

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