California struggles with how to enforce coronavirus orders

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SAN DIEGO (AP) — Health inspectors fanned out to 29 businesses across San Diego County, threatening criminal prosecution and $1,000 fines for ignoring orders to avoid indoor activity during the coronavirus pandemic. Not just that, the businesses’ names appeared on the county’s website — unwelcome publicity as officials push companies to comply with tightening restrictions.The actions Monday marked another turn in a monthslong tug-of-war among officials in California over whether to emphasize enforcement or persuasion as infection rates soar and the holidays arrive along with colder weather and the flu season. ADVERTISEMENTInstructors at The Yoga Box were startled when health inspectors arrived simultaneously at four studios to deliver scolding letters from Dr. Wilma Wooten, San Diego County’s public health officer.Owner Amanda Burns said she complied with two previous state-ordered shutdowns but stayed open Monday after a third order took effect, saying it “was just a matter of trying to survive.”“They’re coming at us harder,” said Burns, who closed her studios after getting cease-and-desist letters on indoor classes because holding them outside is impractical with shorter daylight hours and colder weather. San Diego officials said posting the letters online is an effort to be transparent and not meant to …

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