Augmented Reality Must Have Augmented Privacy

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Imagine walking down the street, looking for a good cup of coffee. In the distance, a storefront glows in green through your smart glasses, indicating a well-reviewed cafe with a sterling public health score. You follow the holographic arrows to the crosswalk, as your wearables silently signal the self-driving cars to be sure they stop for your right of way. In the crowd ahead you recognize someone, but can’t quite place them. A query and response later, “Cameron” pops above their head, along with the context needed to remember they were a classmate from university. You greet them, each of you glad to avoid the awkwardness of not recalling an acquaintance. This is the stuff of science fiction, sometimes utopian, but often as a warning against a dystopia. Lurking in every gadget that can enhance your life is a danger to privacy and security. In either case, augmented reality is coming closer to being an everyday reality.  
In 2013, Google Glass stirred a backlash, but the promise of augmented reality bringing 3D models and computer interfaces into the physical world (while recording everything in the process) is re-emerging. As is the public outcry over privacy and “always-on” recording. In the …

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